Windows Vista Forums

iD10t

  1. #1


    Sel Vol Guest

    iD10t

    Had to bump this thread. Since I am searching for the same answer and have been for a bit now.

    The MS answers were almost "Robotic".

    Hopefully this really shows us what MS is all about.


    Id10T


    Selvol



    SMurde wrote:

    Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags.
    20-Feb-07

    Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags. HTML and Java files ARE text; no
    conversion is necessary.

    "Malke" wrote:

    Previous Posts In This Thread:

    On Sunday, February 18, 2007 12:57 AM
    SMurde wrote:

    Extension Popup
    Everytime I try to rename an extension Windows asks me if I am sure I want to.
    Is there any way to disable that dialog?

    On Sunday, February 18, 2007 8:20 AM
    Malke wrote:

    Re: Extension Popup
    S Murder wrote:

    What you want to do is enable seeing the hidden file extensions. I
    really don't know why, but hiding known file extensions has always been
    the default on Microsoft operating systems. The file extension, if you
    don't know, is the three letters in a file name after the "dot". The
    extension tells Windows what program is associated with that type of file.

    Once you enable seeing the hidden extensions (which is better for safety
    anyway), you'll be able to change the name - and not the extension -
    easily and not get the prompt because your cursor will be in the right
    place to just change the name and not the extension. Enable seeing
    hidden extensions from Folder Options in Control Panel.


    Malke
    --
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic!"
    MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

    On Monday, February 19, 2007 12:37 PM
    R. C. White, MVP wrote:

    Hi, S Murder.
    Hi, S Murder.

    I agree with Malke that the default (Hide extensions) is a dumb thing for
    Microsoft to do!

    The extension is usually - but not always - 3 characters. For example,
    ..mpeg and .jpeg are often used, in addition to the .mpg and .jpg that were
    required back before LFN (Long File Names) were allowed about a dozen years
    ago.

    Nowadays, we must be sure that we are really looking at the extension,
    especially when extensions are hidden. A popular trick for viruses and
    malware is to add a malicious extension after one or more legitimate ones.
    For example, you might have a file named Murder.txt. A malware program
    might add a .vbs extension, making it Murder.txt.vbs. A file cannot have
    more than one extension. Only the characters after the FINAL dot are the
    actual extension; the dots and characters before the final dot are a part of
    the filename, not the extension. So, you might click on what appears to be
    Murder.txt, but the hidden .vbs extension executes the malware's payload.
    Gotcha! :>(

    You should also know that many programs, including many Microsoft programs,
    automatically add extensions when you save files from them. For example, if
    you load Murder.txt into Microsoft Word, then Save it, the filename will
    become Murder.txt.doc. If you've left the default to Hide extensions, you
    won't see the .doc. This might not cause you any problems at all - but it
    might.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@newsgroup
    Microsoft Windows MVP
    (Running Windows Mail in Vista Ultimate x64)

    "S Murder" <SMurder@newsgroup> wrote in message
    news:03D9B1CE-8E22-4AE9-BD96-66E00A927613@newsgroup

    On Monday, February 19, 2007 1:18 PM
    SMurde wrote:

    I already have the "view known extensions" option enabled.
    I already have the "view known extensions" option enabled. I want to now how
    I can edit the extension without Windows butting in.
    For example, when creating a new txt file, I can't erase .txt and retype
    ..java without getting a prompt. How can I stop this?

    "Malke" wrote:

    On Monday, February 19, 2007 7:11 PM
    Malke wrote:

    Re: Extension Popup
    R. C. White, MVP wrote:

    Hi, RC. I think what the OP wants (from his second post) is for Windows
    not to ask him if he's sure when changing the file extension from say
    *.txt to *.jpg. He used this example: "I can't erase .txt and retype
    ..java without getting a prompt".

    To the OP - I don't believe you can get Windows to stop warning you
    because changing the *name* of the file extension (*.txt or whatever) to
    something completing unrelated (like *.jpg) will not actually change the
    real file type. To change the real file type you would need to convert
    the file from one type to another. Sometimes that's possible and
    sometimes that isn't. It depends on what you are trying to convert from
    and to.


    Malke
    --
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic!"
    MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

    On Tuesday, February 20, 2007 1:14 AM
    SMurde wrote:

    Oh gee, well how do I convert text files to java and html files?
    Oh gee, well how do I convert text files to java and html files? Woe is me!

    "Malke" wrote:

    On Tuesday, February 20, 2007 7:42 AM
    Malke wrote:

    Re: Extension Popup
    S Murder wrote:

    By opening them in each particular program if conversion is possible.
    For instance, to convert text to html, you'd copy that text into an html
    editor and then save the new file as whatever.html. Examples of html
    editors are NVU, Dreamweaver, and Expression (Microsoft's replacement
    for FrontPage). You'd create Java files with Sun's Java creator. For
    information on that, go to Sun's website.


    Malke
    --
    Elephant Boy Computers
    www.elephantboycomputers.com
    "Don't Panic!"
    MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User

    On Tuesday, February 20, 2007 2:40 PM
    SMurde wrote:

    Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags.
    Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags. HTML and Java files ARE text; no
    conversion is necessary.

    "Malke" wrote:


    Submitted via EggHeadCafe - Software Developer Portal of Choice
    Java link favorites
    http://www.eggheadcafe.com/tutorials...favorites.aspx

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    Peter Foldes Guest

    Re: iD10t

    I think it is you that is a ID10T for answering to an almost 3 yr old post

    --
    Peter

    Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
    Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.

    <Sel Vol> wrote in message news:2009121203144mail85224@newsgroup

    > Had to bump this thread. Since I am searching for the same answer and have been
    > for a bit now.
    >
    > The MS answers were almost "Robotic".
    >
    > Hopefully this really shows us what MS is all about.
    >
    >
    > Id10T
    >
    >
    > Selvol
    >
    >
    >
    > SMurde wrote:
    >
    > Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags.
    > 20-Feb-07
    >
    > Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags. HTML and Java files ARE text; no
    > conversion is necessary.
    >
    > "Malke" wrote:
    >
    > Previous Posts In This Thread:
    >
    > On Sunday, February 18, 2007 12:57 AM
    > SMurde wrote:
    >
    > Extension Popup
    > Everytime I try to rename an extension Windows asks me if I am sure I want to.
    > Is there any way to disable that dialog?
    >
    > On Sunday, February 18, 2007 8:20 AM
    > Malke wrote:
    >
    > Re: Extension Popup
    > S Murder wrote:
    >
    > What you want to do is enable seeing the hidden file extensions. I
    > really don't know why, but hiding known file extensions has always been
    > the default on Microsoft operating systems. The file extension, if you
    > don't know, is the three letters in a file name after the "dot". The
    > extension tells Windows what program is associated with that type of file.
    >
    > Once you enable seeing the hidden extensions (which is better for safety
    > anyway), you'll be able to change the name - and not the extension -
    > easily and not get the prompt because your cursor will be in the right
    > place to just change the name and not the extension. Enable seeing
    > hidden extensions from Folder Options in Control Panel.
    >
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > Elephant Boy Computers
    > www.elephantboycomputers.com
    > "Don't Panic!"
    > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
    >
    > On Monday, February 19, 2007 12:37 PM
    > R. C. White, MVP wrote:
    >
    > Hi, S Murder.
    > Hi, S Murder.
    >
    > I agree with Malke that the default (Hide extensions) is a dumb thing for
    > Microsoft to do!
    >
    > The extension is usually - but not always - 3 characters. For example,
    > .mpeg and .jpeg are often used, in addition to the .mpg and .jpg that were
    > required back before LFN (Long File Names) were allowed about a dozen years
    > ago.
    >
    > Nowadays, we must be sure that we are really looking at the extension,
    > especially when extensions are hidden. A popular trick for viruses and
    > malware is to add a malicious extension after one or more legitimate ones.
    > For example, you might have a file named Murder.txt. A malware program
    > might add a .vbs extension, making it Murder.txt.vbs. A file cannot have
    > more than one extension. Only the characters after the FINAL dot are the
    > actual extension; the dots and characters before the final dot are a part of
    > the filename, not the extension. So, you might click on what appears to be
    > Murder.txt, but the hidden .vbs extension executes the malware's payload.
    > Gotcha! :>(
    >
    > You should also know that many programs, including many Microsoft programs,
    > automatically add extensions when you save files from them. For example, if
    > you load Murder.txt into Microsoft Word, then Save it, the filename will
    > become Murder.txt.doc. If you've left the default to Hide extensions, you
    > won't see the .doc. This might not cause you any problems at all - but it
    > might.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    > rc@newsgroup
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > (Running Windows Mail in Vista Ultimate x64)
    >
    > "S Murder" <SMurder@newsgroup> wrote in message
    > news:03D9B1CE-8E22-4AE9-BD96-66E00A927613@newsgroup
    >
    > On Monday, February 19, 2007 1:18 PM
    > SMurde wrote:
    >
    > I already have the "view known extensions" option enabled.
    > I already have the "view known extensions" option enabled. I want to now how
    > I can edit the extension without Windows butting in.
    > For example, when creating a new txt file, I can't erase .txt and retype
    > .java without getting a prompt. How can I stop this?
    >
    > "Malke" wrote:
    >
    > On Monday, February 19, 2007 7:11 PM
    > Malke wrote:
    >
    > Re: Extension Popup
    > R. C. White, MVP wrote:
    >
    > Hi, RC. I think what the OP wants (from his second post) is for Windows
    > not to ask him if he's sure when changing the file extension from say
    > *.txt to *.jpg. He used this example: "I can't erase .txt and retype
    > .java without getting a prompt".
    >
    > To the OP - I don't believe you can get Windows to stop warning you
    > because changing the *name* of the file extension (*.txt or whatever) to
    > something completing unrelated (like *.jpg) will not actually change the
    > real file type. To change the real file type you would need to convert
    > the file from one type to another. Sometimes that's possible and
    > sometimes that isn't. It depends on what you are trying to convert from
    > and to.
    >
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > Elephant Boy Computers
    > www.elephantboycomputers.com
    > "Don't Panic!"
    > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
    >
    > On Tuesday, February 20, 2007 1:14 AM
    > SMurde wrote:
    >
    > Oh gee, well how do I convert text files to java and html files?
    > Oh gee, well how do I convert text files to java and html files? Woe is me!
    >
    > "Malke" wrote:
    >
    > On Tuesday, February 20, 2007 7:42 AM
    > Malke wrote:
    >
    > Re: Extension Popup
    > S Murder wrote:
    >
    > By opening them in each particular program if conversion is possible.
    > For instance, to convert text to html, you'd copy that text into an html
    > editor and then save the new file as whatever.html. Examples of html
    > editors are NVU, Dreamweaver, and Expression (Microsoft's replacement
    > for FrontPage). You'd create Java files with Sun's Java creator. For
    > information on that, go to Sun's website.
    >
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > Elephant Boy Computers
    > www.elephantboycomputers.com
    > "Don't Panic!"
    > MS-MVP Windows - Shell/User
    >
    > On Tuesday, February 20, 2007 2:40 PM
    > SMurde wrote:
    >
    > Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags.
    > Sorry, I forgot my <sarcasm> tags. HTML and Java files ARE text; no
    > conversion is necessary.
    >
    > "Malke" wrote:
    >
    >
    > Submitted via EggHeadCafe - Software Developer Portal of Choice
    > Java link favorites
    > http://www.eggheadcafe.com/tutorials...favorites.aspx

      My System SpecsSystem Spec


iD10t