Windows Vista Forums

Vista & RAID/SATA setups

  1. #1


    Ron O'Brien Guest

    Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    I am about to install Vista Home Premium on my PC which has a 160g PATA hard
    drive as the C:/ drive (which I want to continue to be the C: drive with
    Windows on). It also has two 30g SATA drives with RAID 1 configuration for
    back-ups.

    I am told that if I wipe my C drive when I go to install Vista, Vista will
    try to install on the SATA drives and may not let me install on th PATA
    (current C) drive. - is that true?

    Also, I am told that Vista will not recognise the RAID1 set up on my SATA
    drives - so how will I get Vista to access the data on that drive?

    Any help appreciated

    Ron



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  2. #2


    Nick Mason Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups


    "Andy C.(never #)" <acamfield@xxxxxx> wrote in message
    news:9de65bc6-0bff-4c3b-b482-653d20e2e11c@xxxxxx

    > On Dec 28, 8:34 am, "Ron O'Brien" <castc...@xxxxxx> wrote:

    >> I am about to install Vista Home Premium on my PC which has a 160g PATA
    >> hard
    >> drive as the C:/ drive (which I want to continue to be the C: drive with
    >> Windows on). It also has two 30g SATA drives with RAID 1 configuration
    >> for
    >> back-ups.
    >>
    >> I am told that if I wipe my C drive when I go to install Vista, Vista
    >> will
    >> try to install on the SATA drives and may not let me install on th PATA
    >> (current C) drive. - is that true?
    >>
    >> Also, I am told that Vista will not recognise the RAID1 set up on my SATA
    >> drives - so how will I get Vista to access the data on that drive?
    >>
    >> Any help appreciated
    >>
    >> Ron
    >
    > Hey, Ron. Not sure I understand what you are trying to do here... If I
    > remember correctly, RAID 1 has to do with pairs of drives setup in a
    > mirroring configuration. That means everything written to the first
    > drive gets written to the second drive. It is the most reliable form
    > of backup, but in years past it was a little finicky in that the drive
    > pairs had to be pretty much identical right down to the model number
    > or it would not work. Don't think it is that bad anymore, but pretty
    > sure trying to mirror a 160GB drive onto a 30GB drive is not a good
    > idea.
    >
    > Hope this helps.
    >
    The mirror is one of the 30Gb pair mirrored on the other 30Gb so that if one
    disk fails all your data is mirrored on the other drive.


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  3. #3


    Kerry Brown Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    Before you start this backup to external media. This could be CD, DVD, USB
    drive whatever. Even though you have a RAID 1 array a backup that is stored
    on your computer is not really a backup but a convenient way to recover
    something quickly. There are many things that could go wrong while
    installing an OS that could corrupt any drives that are installed.

    Much depends on the BIOS. With some BIOS' Vista will always see the first
    SATA drive as the boot drive no matter what you do. You can still install
    Vista on the PATA drive if this happens but the boot sector will be on the
    first SATA drive. This only seems to happen on some older motherboards. Make
    sure the BIOS is set to boot from the PATA drive and you will probably be
    OK. If you are not dual booting. Delete the partitions on the PATA drive and
    recreate one partition to install Vista on. Do this from the Vista
    installation. If you need more partitions leave room for them and create
    them later once Vista is installed. Note that this will erase everything on
    this drive so make sure you have anything important backed up,

    Whether or not Vista will see your RAID array is hard to tell from your
    description. You will probably have to install the RAID driver during the
    Vista install. Make sure you have the appropriate Vista driver (32 bit or 64
    bit) on a floppy, CD, or USB drive before you start. On the screen where you
    tell Vista which drive/partition to install on load the driver before you
    specify which drive/partition to install on.

    --
    Kerry Brown
    Microsoft MVP - Shell/User
    http://www.vistahelp.ca/phpBB2/



    "Ron O'Brien" <castcall@xxxxxx> wrote in message
    news:dX6dj.17350$745.1770@xxxxxx-win.ntli.net...

    >I am about to install Vista Home Premium on my PC which has a 160g PATA
    >hard drive as the C:/ drive (which I want to continue to be the C: drive
    >with Windows on). It also has two 30g SATA drives with RAID 1 configuration
    >for back-ups.
    >
    > I am told that if I wipe my C drive when I go to install Vista, Vista will
    > try to install on the SATA drives and may not let me install on th PATA
    > (current C) drive. - is that true?
    >
    > Also, I am told that Vista will not recognise the RAID1 set up on my SATA
    > drives - so how will I get Vista to access the data on that drive?
    >
    > Any help appreciated
    >
    > Ron
    >

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  4. #4


    the wharf rat Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    In article <9de65bc6-0bff-4c3b-b482-653d20e2e11c@xxxxxx>,
    Andy C.(never #) <acamfield@xxxxxx> wrote:

    > [ simple mirroing ]
    >It is the most reliable form of backup
    It's not backup because errors on one drive (accidentaly deleted
    files, for instance) are propagated to the mirror. It's really disaster
    recovery, as in whoops lost a drive well ok...

    > but in years past it was a little finicky in that the drive
    You've always been able to mirror partitions. Drives didn't have
    to be identical but should have roughly similar performance. If one drive's
    much larger you just mirror a partition equal to the smaller drive. Maybe
    that doesn't work on those cheap-ass home ide controllers, I dunno.,

    >sure trying to mirror a 160GB drive onto a 30GB drive is not a good
    You do it the other way around, 30GB->partition on the 160.



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  5. #5


    Ron O'Brien Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    Hi Everyone,

    Thanks for the advice given so far. To explain a little more in depth....

    The PATA drive is my day-to-day drive - mine is a simple need! The SATA
    drive(s) is what I use to back up everything in my My Documents folder to
    and I also use it when I do some video editing (which isn't often, but I'm
    told saving the video files on a SATA drive and working on them is faster
    and generally better.

    So, yes there are in fact 2 identical 30g Western Digital Sata drives in the
    PC that are connected to an on board Via controller configured for RAID 1
    (the mobo is an Asus A8v deluxe).

    My real concern is if when I install the SATA/RAID drives where Vista will
    see them, I remember doing this in XP and when the RAID driver was installed
    through XP it insisted on configuring the drives and warned me that in so
    doing all data on the drives would be erased.

    A further question..... is there any benefit to me disconecting the SATA
    drives, installing Vista on the PATA then adding the SATA drives after
    everything is installed and working?

    Thanks


    Ron



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  6. #6


    the wharf rat Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    In article <_s9dj.7300$ou3.5322@xxxxxx-win.ntli.net>,
    Ron O'Brien <castcall@xxxxxx> wrote:

    >
    >My real concern is if when I install the SATA/RAID drives where Vista will
    >see them, I remember doing this in XP and when the RAID driver was installed
    >through XP it insisted on configuring the drives and warned me that in so
    >doing all data on the drives would be erased.
    >
    If you use hardware (well, firmware) RAID supplied by the controller
    then chaging the OS shouldn't matter; the controller will present the array
    as a single physical drive. If you use software RAID supplied by the OS then
    changing the OS is very likely to completely break the RAID volumes.

    >A further question..... is there any benefit to me disconecting the SATA
    >drives, installing Vista on the PATA then adding the SATA drives after
    If you're using software RAID you're hosed anyway. Back up the
    array data to an external device, let the OS do what it wants during the
    install, reconfigure to be the way you want afterwards and then put the
    data back.


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  7. #7


    Nick Mason Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups


    "Ron O'Brien" <castcall@xxxxxx> wrote in message
    news:_s9dj.7300$ou3.5322@xxxxxx-win.ntli.net...

    > Hi Everyone,
    >
    > Thanks for the advice given so far. To explain a little more in depth....
    >
    > The PATA drive is my day-to-day drive - mine is a simple need! The SATA
    > drive(s) is what I use to back up everything in my My Documents folder to
    > and I also use it when I do some video editing (which isn't often, but I'm
    > told saving the video files on a SATA drive and working on them is faster
    > and generally better.
    >
    OK, so you back up your main drive to the SATA RAID disks.

    If it's performance you're after then you should be using RAID 0 - striping,
    rather than RAID 1 - Mirroring.

    As someone else has said RAID 1 doesn't give you an additional software
    backup, it gives you hardware redundancy. Your two 30Gb disks perform as 1
    drive if one dies you still have the files as the remaining drive still
    works. It doesn't give you any performance increase.

    If you delete a file it gets deleted from the mirror as well. Obviously if
    the files you are backing up to the RAID array are extremely important then
    hardware redundancy is maybe what you want.

    Regards
    Nick


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  8. #8


    the wharf rat Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    In article <D914F706-BCDF-4FDF-9A16-8921AA947523@xxxxxx>,
    Nick Mason <noemail@xxxxxx> wrote:

    >
    >works. It doesn't give you any performance increase.
    >
    Strictly speaking it gives you ~2x read performance
    and ~.5x write :-) If you're heavily read-biased a simple mirror can
    actually help.


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  9. #9


    Ken Blake, MVP Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    On Fri, 28 Dec 2007 06:20:13 -0800 (PST), "Andy C.(never #)"
    <acamfield@xxxxxx> wrote:

    > RAID 1 has to do with pairs of drives setup in a
    > mirroring configuration. That means everything written to the first
    > drive gets written to the second drive. It is the most reliable form
    > of backup,

    I couldn't disagree more. It is not only *not* the most reliable form
    of backup, it is not really any kind of backup at all.

    RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or more
    drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy, not
    backup. It's used in situations (almost always within corporations,
    not in homes) where any downtown can't be tolerated, because the way
    it works is that if one drive fails the other takes over seamlessly.

    Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup technique, that is
    *not* what it is, since it's subject to simultaneous loss of the
    original and the mirror to many of the most common dangers threatening
    your data--severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, virus
    attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most companies that use RAID 1
    also have a strong external backup plan in place.

    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP Windows - Shell/User
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup

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  10. #10


    Ron O'Brien Guest

    Re: Vista & RAID/SATA setups

    To clarify.

    My PATA (C:/ )drive is 160gig and I have two SATA drives each 30gig set as
    RAID1, which is why I use them as a back-up for important files stored on my
    main C: drive. I DO NOT use the RAID1 configuration as a secure back-up
    solution for the many reasons already given by others in this thread, it's
    just added insurance incase one of those drives should fail.

    I just needed to know if, when I install Vista, my SATA drives (as RAID1)
    would be instantly recognised and readable, because the last time I
    re-installed XP Pro, I had to re-configure RAID1 which then wiped everything
    from the disk (or at least made it unreadable).

    Also would there be any benefit for me to set up Vista on my PATA C: drive
    and then add the SATA drives after Vista is up and running?


    Ron



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