Windows Vista Forums

XP -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator

  1. #1


    eBob.com Guest

    XP -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator

    I've done considerable research and have insured that I am in compliance
    with the MS article "File and Printer Sharing in Windows Vista", but when I
    use a Save As dialog on my XP machine to save a file to the Vista machine I
    get the message "You do not have access to the folder xxxxxxx. See your
    administrator for access to the folder." This is a simple P2P home network.

    The XP machine can save to the Vista "Public" folder.

    I have setup the Vista machine to be as open as possible. The share I can't
    get to is the E-drive and I've made it available to "Everyone". And
    "Everyone" can do everything - Full Control, Change, and Read! "Password
    protected sharing" is Off.

    In the Save As dialog when I click on "My Network Places" I can see the
    Public folder on the Vista machine but not the E-drive. However, when I
    navigate to the Vista machine (i.e. Entire Network > Microsoft Windows
    Network > Bobshome > the Vista Machine) then I can see both the Public
    folder and the E-drive. When I double click the E-drive I get the message
    "You do not have access to the folder xxxxxxx. See your administrator for
    access to the folder."

    (The problem is not unique to the Save As dialog, that's just where I first
    encountered it. I have a similar problem, although not exactly the same
    message text, if I simply try, from the XP machine, to see what is on the
    Vista E-drive.)

    I'd be grateful if someone can suggest where I go next with this.

    Thanks, Bob


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  2. #2


    Malke Guest

    Re: XP -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator

    eBob.com wrote:

    > I've done considerable research and have insured that I am in compliance
    > with the MS article "File and Printer Sharing in Windows Vista", but when
    > I use a Save As dialog on my XP machine to save a file to the Vista
    > machine I
    > get the message "You do not have access to the folder xxxxxxx. See your
    > administrator for access to the folder." This is a simple P2P home
    > network.
    >
    > The XP machine can save to the Vista "Public" folder.
    >
    > I have setup the Vista machine to be as open as possible. The share I
    > can't
    > get to is the E-drive and I've made it available to "Everyone". And
    > "Everyone" can do everything - Full Control, Change, and Read! "Password
    > protected sharing" is Off.
    (snippage)

    Turn password protected sharing ON. Follow these directions and you will be
    able to share to folders other than Public:

    Create matching user accounts and passwords on all machines. You do not need
    to be logged into the same account on all machines and the passwords
    assigned to each user account can be different; the accounts/passwords just
    need to exist and match on all machines. DO NOT NEGLECT TO CREATE
    PASSWORDS, EVEN IF ONLY SIMPLE ONES. If you wish a machine to boot directly
    to the Desktop (into one particular user's account) for convenience, you
    can do this. The instructions at this link work for both XP and Vista:

    Configure Windows to Automatically Login (MVP Ramesh) -
    http://windowsxp.mvps.org/Autologon.htm

    If one or more of the computers is XP Pro or Media Center, turn off Simple
    File Sharing (Folder Options>View tab).

    Create shares as desired. XP Home does not permit sharing of users' home
    directories or Program Files, but you can share folders inside those
    directories. A better choice is to simply use the Shared Documents folder.

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP
    Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  3. #3


    eBob.com Guest

    XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)


    "Malke" <malke@xxxxxx> wrote in message
    news:uYgsOavXJHA.4852@xxxxxx

    > eBob.com wrote:
    >

    >> I've done considerable research and have insured that I am in compliance
    >> with the MS article "File and Printer Sharing in Windows Vista", but when
    >> I use a Save As dialog on my XP machine to save a file to the Vista
    >> machine I
    >> get the message "You do not have access to the folder xxxxxxx. See your
    >> administrator for access to the folder." This is a simple P2P home
    >> network.
    >>
    >> The XP machine can save to the Vista "Public" folder.
    >>
    >> I have setup the Vista machine to be as open as possible. The share I
    >> can't
    >> get to is the E-drive and I've made it available to "Everyone". And
    >> "Everyone" can do everything - Full Control, Change, and Read! "Password
    >> protected sharing" is Off.
    >
    > (snippage)
    >
    > Turn password protected sharing ON. Follow these directions and you will
    > be
    > able to share to folders other than Public:
    >
    > Create matching user accounts and passwords on all machines. You do not
    > need
    > to be logged into the same account on all machines and the passwords
    > assigned to each user account can be different; the accounts/passwords
    > just
    > need to exist and match on all machines. DO NOT NEGLECT TO CREATE
    > PASSWORDS, EVEN IF ONLY SIMPLE ONES. If you wish a machine to boot
    > directly
    > to the Desktop (into one particular user's account) for convenience, you
    > can do this. The instructions at this link work for both XP and Vista:
    >
    > Configure Windows to Automatically Login (MVP Ramesh) -
    > http://windowsxp.mvps.org/Autologon.htm
    >
    > If one or more of the computers is XP Pro or Media Center, turn off Simple
    > File Sharing (Folder Options>View tab).
    >
    > Create shares as desired. XP Home does not permit sharing of users' home
    > directories or Program Files, but you can share folders inside those
    > directories. A better choice is to simply use the Shared Documents folder.
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > MS-MVP
    > Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    > FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ
    >
    Malke,

    Thanks very much for your assistance.

    My XP machine is XP Pro so thanks for pointing out that wrinkle.

    I was unable to find a way to turn off "Simple File Sharing" in Folder
    Options>View tab. But I did find, and turned off (i.e. unchecked) "Use
    Sharing Wizard". Is that what you meant?

    Also I turned on "Password protected sharing".

    Then I created a password for my "default" userid on the XP Pro machine.
    And I created a "default" userid on the Vista machine and gave it the same
    password as on the XP Pro machine.

    Then I hoped that you didn't mean that I HAD to create all of the same
    userid/password pairs on ALL machines because I'd rather not have to do
    that. So logged on to the XP Pro machine as "default" I tried to access the
    E-drive on the Vista machine and nothing has changed.

    I am not sure if you RECOMMENDED that I "Create matching user accounts and
    passwords on all machines" for convenience or if that's NECESSARY! I only
    mentioned two machines in my post but there are several and each has a
    number of userids.

    Do I HAVE TO "Create matching user accounts and passwords on all machines"
    or was that a RECOMMENDATION for convenience?

    Thanks, Bob


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  4. #4


    Malke Guest

    Re: XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)

    eBob.com wrote:

    > My XP machine is XP Pro so thanks for pointing out that wrinkle.
    >
    > I was unable to find a way to turn off "Simple File Sharing" in Folder
    > Options>View tab. But I did find, and turned off (i.e. unchecked) "Use
    > Sharing Wizard". Is that what you meant?
    >
    > Also I turned on "Password protected sharing".
    >
    > Then I created a password for my "default" userid on the XP Pro machine.
    > And I created a "default" userid on the Vista machine and gave it the same
    > password as on the XP Pro machine.
    >
    > Then I hoped that you didn't mean that I HAD to create all of the same
    > userid/password pairs on ALL machines because I'd rather not have to do
    > that. So logged on to the XP Pro machine as "default" I tried to access
    > the E-drive on the Vista machine and nothing has changed.
    >
    > I am not sure if you RECOMMENDED that I "Create matching user accounts and
    > passwords on all machines" for convenience or if that's NECESSARY! I only
    > mentioned two machines in my post but there are several and each has a
    > number of userids.
    >
    > Do I HAVE TO "Create matching user accounts and passwords on all machines"
    > or was that a RECOMMENDATION for convenience?
    It is not a "recommendation for convenience". It is necessary if you want to
    share resources in a Workgroup aside from Public directories. Very simply,
    in peer-to-peer networks (Workgroups in the Windows world), authentication
    is done on the *local* machine. So let's assume we have:

    Machine A - user Bob, password 1234
    user Jane, password 4567
    user Phil, password 9870

    Machine B - user Bob, password 1234
    user Jane, password 4567

    If Phil is logged onto Machine A and tries to access shared resources from
    Machine B, he will be refused access since Machine B doesn't recognize him
    (no user account Phil, password 9870). He'll be asked to submit credentials
    of a known user. So yes, all users who need access to shared resources need
    to have matching user accounts and passwords on all machines involved.

    The alternative is to use "simple sharing" which means that the network
    connection is made as guest. This guest connection cannot access shared
    resources in user space and that's why only Public (All Users Shared
    Documents in XP) is accessible to them.

    With only a few machines, creating the user accounts and passwords is not an
    onerous task. If one has many (more than ~7 in a workplace) machines, then
    a server should be used. The advantage to using a server running a server
    operating system and creating an Active Directory domain is that all
    user/password management is done in one place, centrally on the server.

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP
    Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  5. #5


    eBob.com Guest

    Re: XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)


    "Malke" <malke@xxxxxx> wrote in message
    news:e6aBzVwXJHA.1336@xxxxxx

    > eBob.com wrote:
    >

    >> My XP machine is XP Pro so thanks for pointing out that wrinkle.
    >>
    >> I was unable to find a way to turn off "Simple File Sharing" in Folder
    >> Options>View tab. But I did find, and turned off (i.e. unchecked) "Use
    >> Sharing Wizard". Is that what you meant?
    >>
    >> Also I turned on "Password protected sharing".
    >>
    >> Then I created a password for my "default" userid on the XP Pro machine.
    >> And I created a "default" userid on the Vista machine and gave it the
    >> same
    >> password as on the XP Pro machine.
    >>
    >> Then I hoped that you didn't mean that I HAD to create all of the same
    >> userid/password pairs on ALL machines because I'd rather not have to do
    >> that. So logged on to the XP Pro machine as "default" I tried to access
    >> the E-drive on the Vista machine and nothing has changed.
    >>
    >> I am not sure if you RECOMMENDED that I "Create matching user accounts
    >> and
    >> passwords on all machines" for convenience or if that's NECESSARY! I
    >> only
    >> mentioned two machines in my post but there are several and each has a
    >> number of userids.
    >>
    >> Do I HAVE TO "Create matching user accounts and passwords on all
    >> machines"
    >> or was that a RECOMMENDATION for convenience?
    >
    > It is not a "recommendation for convenience". It is necessary if you want
    > to
    > share resources in a Workgroup aside from Public directories. Very simply,
    > in peer-to-peer networks (Workgroups in the Windows world), authentication
    > is done on the *local* machine. So let's assume we have:
    >
    > Machine A - user Bob, password 1234
    > user Jane, password 4567
    > user Phil, password 9870
    >
    > Machine B - user Bob, password 1234
    > user Jane, password 4567
    >
    > If Phil is logged onto Machine A and tries to access shared resources from
    > Machine B, he will be refused access since Machine B doesn't recognize him
    > (no user account Phil, password 9870). He'll be asked to submit
    > credentials
    > of a known user. So yes, all users who need access to shared resources
    > need
    > to have matching user accounts and passwords on all machines involved.
    >
    > The alternative is to use "simple sharing" which means that the network
    > connection is made as guest. This guest connection cannot access shared
    > resources in user space and that's why only Public (All Users Shared
    > Documents in XP) is accessible to them.
    >
    > With only a few machines, creating the user accounts and passwords is not
    > an
    > onerous task. If one has many (more than ~7 in a workplace) machines, then
    > a server should be used. The advantage to using a server running a server
    > operating system and creating an Active Directory domain is that all
    > user/password management is done in one place, centrally on the server.
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > MS-MVP
    > Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    > FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ
    >
    Hi Malke,

    Thanks for your continued help and very prompt replies.

    Your example makes perfect sense. But how 'bout if Phil is defined only on
    machine A and not on machine B, as in your example, but never has need to
    access machine B. Can Bob and Jane still access machine A from machine B
    and vice-versa? I'd think/hope so. But, if so, then I don't understand why
    I am still having a problem. I have "default" defined on both machines, the
    XP Pro and the Vista machine, both with the same password, but logged on the
    XP Pro machine as "default" I cannot access the shared E-drive on the Vista
    machine. By the way, since it made a difference that the XP machine is XP
    Pro, I should point out that the Vista machine is Vista Ultimate.

    Thanks again for your continued help.

    Bob


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  6. #6


    Malke Guest

    Re: XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)

    eBob.com wrote:

    > Your example makes perfect sense. But how 'bout if Phil is defined only
    > on machine A and not on machine B, as in your example, but never has need
    > to
    > access machine B. Can Bob and Jane still access machine A from machine B
    > and vice-versa? I'd think/hope so.
    Yes, of course.

    > But, if so, then I don't understand
    > why
    > I am still having a problem. I have "default" defined on both machines,
    > the XP Pro and the Vista machine, both with the same password, but logged
    > on the XP Pro machine as "default" I cannot access the shared E-drive on
    > the Vista
    > machine. By the way, since it made a difference that the XP machine is XP
    > Pro, I should point out that the Vista machine is Vista Ultimate.
    I don't know what you mean by "default". There is a Default user but this
    isn't a real user. The Default User, seen when hidden files/folders are
    visible, is the template for all new user accounts, not an active user
    account.

    If you have created identical user accounts and passwords on all machines
    and are still getting "access denied", then:

    1. You have a misconfigured firewall;

    2. And/or your security settings on the shared resource are incorrect. Look
    on the Security tab and make sure your users have read/write permissions.
    You can add individual users (ex. if only Bob is allowed and not Jane) or
    allow Everyone to read/write. Everyone means everyone with a user account
    on the local machine, not everyone in the world.

    XP Pro needs to have simple sharing disabled. Vista Ultimate handles this
    with the pasword protection on and doesn't have a simple sharing check box
    in Folder Options like XP does.

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP
    Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  7. #7


    eBob.com Guest

    Re: XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)

    Hi Malke,

    I really appreciate your continued help. PLEASE hang in there with me
    because I have got to get this working.

    "Malke" <malke@xxxxxx> wrote in message
    news:O3GYz53XJHA.1188@xxxxxx
    < trimmed >

    > I don't know what you mean by "default". There is a Default user but this
    > isn't a real user. The Default User, seen when hidden files/folders are
    > visible, is the template for all new user accounts, not an active user
    > account.
    I have a useid on both machines, "default", which is exactly that - the
    seven letters "default". It's the userid I use most often on the XP Pro
    machine.

    >
    > If you have created identical user accounts and passwords on all machines
    > and are still getting "access denied", then:
    The one id "default" is defined on both machines and has the same password
    on both machines. In case it might make some difference the Vista machine
    is Ultimate, 64-bit. And, while I am fully disclosing, it has an AMD chip.

    Also, I think that now I am getting a slightly different error message than
    originally. On the XP Pro machine when I click on "My Network Places" the
    window which opens shows me the shared drive on the Vista machine, "E-drive
    on Gigavista64". When I double click on that, after a surprisingly long
    time, 20 seconds - I timed it, I get this error message:

    "\\GIGAVISTA64\E-drive is not accessible. You might not have permission to
    use this network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to find
    out if you have access permissions.

    Logon failure: the user has not been granted the requested logon type at
    this computer"

    BTW, when I look at Properties/Sharing there is a button labled "Share ..."
    which is greyed out. That's disconcerting but I think that in my original
    research I learned that it's OK.

    >
    > 1. You have a misconfigured firewall;
    I haven't installed a firewall on the Vista machine. I use an old version
    of ZoneAlarm on the XP Pro machine but shutting it down makes no difference.

    > 2. And/or your security settings on the shared resource are incorrect.
    > Look
    > on the Security tab and make sure your users have read/write permissions.
    > You can add individual users (ex. if only Bob is allowed and not Jane) or
    > allow Everyone to read/write. Everyone means everyone with a user account
    > on the local machine, not everyone in the world.
    I hadn't looked at the Security tab before and I wasn't sure what to do
    there. Under "Group or user names:" it already had "Users
    (GIGAVISTA64\Users)" and "default" is a defined userid on the machine. But
    I added "Everyone" to "Group or user names:" and gave "Everyone" all
    permissions except for "Full Control" and "Special Permissions". (I tried
    to give it "Full Control" but then got "An error occurred while applying
    security information to E:\$RECYCLE.BIN Access is denied". I hope I
    haven't done any damage!)

    What I wanted to do here, but couldn't, was to specifically add user
    "default". But when I click on "Advanced Sharing ..." (on the Sharing tab
    of Properties), and then click on Permissions, and then try to "Add ..." to
    the "Group or user names:", the "Select Users or Groups" dialog only knows
    about location "GIGAVISTA64". (I.E. I click on the "Locations ..." button
    and GIGAVISTA64 is the only entry in the list.) I expected to find
    "VPR-MATRIX" in there. (That's the name of the XP Pro machine and it shows
    up in "Network". So the Vista machine does know about it.)

    >
    > XP Pro needs to have simple sharing disabled. Vista Ultimate handles this
    > with the pasword protection on and doesn't have a simple sharing check box
    > in Folder Options like XP does.
    Done. (Now. It had been enabled.)

    I expect that this is getting frustrating for you but I sure hope you will
    continue to help me.

    Thanks, Bob

    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > MS-MVP
    > Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    > FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ
    >

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  8. #8


    Malke Guest

    Re: XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)

    eBob.com wrote:


    > I really appreciate your continued help. PLEASE hang in there with me
    > because I have got to get this working.
    Yes, but it would have been better to get *all* the information first in one
    post instead of dragging it out in dribs and drabs.

    > I have a useid on both machines, "default", which is exactly that - the
    > seven letters "default". It's the userid I use most often on the XP Pro
    > machine.

    > The one id "default" is defined on both machines and has the same password
    > on both machines. In case it might make some difference the Vista machine
    > is Ultimate, 64-bit. And, while I am fully disclosing, it has an AMD
    > chip.
    It makes no difference that one OS is 64-bit and the other is 32-bit. I
    share files between machines running Vista, XP Pro, Mac OS X, and Linux.
    The processor doesn't matter in networking either.

    > Also, I think that now I am getting a slightly different error message
    > than
    > originally. On the XP Pro machine when I click on "My Network Places" the
    > window which opens shows me the shared drive on the Vista machine,
    > "E-drive
    > on Gigavista64". When I double click on that, after a surprisingly long
    > time, 20 seconds - I timed it, I get this error message:
    >
    > "\\GIGAVISTA64\E-drive is not accessible. You might not have permission
    > to
    > use this network resource. Contact the administrator of this server to
    > find out if you have access permissions.
    >
    > Logon failure: the user has not been granted the requested logon type at
    > this computer"
    >
    > BTW, when I look at Properties/Sharing there is a button labled "Share
    > ..."
    > which is greyed out. That's disconcerting but I think that in my original
    > research I learned that it's OK.
    Are you trying to share the root of a drive in Vista? This is not considered
    good security practice so the root of a drive is protected in Vista. To get
    around this:

    From Michael Bell, MS - When you share out the root of a drive in Vista, the
    UI only allows this through the advanced sharing option. When the advanced
    sharing option is used it only sets the share permissions. The actual
    permissions on a file share are a combination of Folder and Share
    permissions. In Vista the everyone group doesn not have permissions so
    when you connect without a password the system you can see the folders but
    not access them or possibly connect to the share but fail to open it.

    1. Open Computer
    2. Right click on the shared drive and select properties from the context
    menu
    3. Select the Security Tab in the displayed properties sheet.

    If you are connecting to the computer with no password then you are
    connecting with the guest account. In order to access the files on the
    drive, the everyone group needs to have access set here.

    >> 1. You have a misconfigured firewall;
    >
    > I haven't installed a firewall on the Vista machine. I use an old version
    > of ZoneAlarm on the XP Pro machine but shutting it down makes no
    > difference.
    You should uninstall ZA according to their instructions.

    1. Go into ZA Overview/Preferences and uncheck "Load Zone Alarm on Startup".
    2. Reboot computer to remove Zone Alarm drivers from memory.
    3. Temporarily shut down any other AV/security programs.
    4. Click on Start >Programs > Zone Labs. RIGHT-click on Uninstall Zone Labs
    Security, then select Properties. Under Target you will see the following
    line (the actual drive may be different on your system):

    "C:\Program Files\Zone Labs\ZoneAlarm\zauninstexe" - Change it to:
    "C:\Program Files\Zone Labs\ZoneAlarm\zauninst.exe" /clean /rmlicense (add a
    space and then the /clean). Click OK to save.
    Say "Yes" when being prompted for the removal of all files and allow
    TrueVector to shut down. Reboot.

    Now start in Safe Mode and delete these files in the Windows Directory:

    WINDOWS\ Internet Logs
    Program Files\Zone Labs
    WINDOWS\system32\ Zonelabs

    Now reboot into Regular Mode.

    >> 2. And/or your security settings on the shared resource are incorrect.
    >> Look
    >> on the Security tab and make sure your users have read/write permissions.
    >> You can add individual users (ex. if only Bob is allowed and not Jane) or
    >> allow Everyone to read/write. Everyone means everyone with a user account
    >> on the local machine, not everyone in the world.
    >
    > I hadn't looked at the Security tab before and I wasn't sure what to do
    > there. Under "Group or user names:" it already had "Users
    > (GIGAVISTA64\Users)" and "default" is a defined userid on the machine.
    > But I added "Everyone" to "Group or user names:" and gave "Everyone" all
    > permissions except for "Full Control" and "Special Permissions". (I tried
    > to give it "Full Control" but then got "An error occurred while applying
    > security information to E:\$RECYCLE.BIN Access is denied". I hope I
    > haven't done any damage!)
    >
    > What I wanted to do here, but couldn't, was to specifically add user
    > "default". But when I click on "Advanced Sharing ..." (on the Sharing tab
    > of Properties), and then click on Permissions, and then try to "Add ..."
    > to the "Group or user names:", the "Select Users or Groups" dialog only
    > knows
    > about location "GIGAVISTA64". (I.E. I click on the "Locations ..." button
    > and GIGAVISTA64 is the only entry in the list.) I expected to find
    > "VPR-MATRIX" in there. (That's the name of the XP Pro machine and it
    > shows
    > up in "Network". So the Vista machine does know about it.)
    Sorry, you've totally lost me with the above. I don't know why you're having
    such difficulties unless it's the root of a drive thing.

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP
    Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ


      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #9


    Malke Guest

    Re: XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)

    Malke wrote:

    > eBob.com wrote:
    >
    >

    >> I really appreciate your continued help. PLEASE hang in there with me
    >> because I have got to get this working.
    Addendum - I believe one of your major problems could be that you've called
    a user account "default". In XP, this wasn't an issue because the template
    user is called "Default User". However, in Vista it is called simply
    "Default". Just like you never give a computer the same name as a user
    account (ex. don't name your computer "bob" if you have a user account
    "bob"), you don't want to have a user account called by the same name as a
    System account.

    Solution:

    Create a new user account on all computers that will replace "default". If
    you've been using "default", then you will copy the old account to the new
    one. You must log into the new one first before you can copy anything to
    it.

    This is for XP:
    Copy a User Account - http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=811151

    Since you just started with Vista, I expect you don't want to go through the
    bother of copying the "default" profile but can just start fresh.

    You can't simply rename user accounts; that will only make a cosmetic change
    and not alter the underlying files/folders/registry entries.

    Malke
    --
    MS-MVP
    Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ


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  10. #10


    eBob.com Guest

    Re: XP Pro -> Vista: You do not have access ... See administrator (was XP -> Vista: You do not have access ...)


    "Malke" <malke@xxxxxx> wrote in message
    news:e3VpKK8XJHA.6036@xxxxxx

    > Malke wrote:
    >

    >> eBob.com wrote:
    >>
    >>

    >>> I really appreciate your continued help. PLEASE hang in there with me
    >>> because I have got to get this working.
    >
    > Addendum - I believe one of your major problems could be that you've
    > called
    > a user account "default". In XP, this wasn't an issue because the template
    > user is called "Default User". However, in Vista it is called simply
    > "Default". Just like you never give a computer the same name as a user
    > account (ex. don't name your computer "bob" if you have a user account
    > "bob"), you don't want to have a user account called by the same name as a
    > System account.
    >
    > Solution:
    >
    > Create a new user account on all computers that will replace "default". If
    > you've been using "default", then you will copy the old account to the new
    > one. You must log into the new one first before you can copy anything to
    > it.
    >
    > This is for XP:
    > Copy a User Account -
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?kbid=811151
    >
    > Since you just started with Vista, I expect you don't want to go through
    > the
    > bother of copying the "default" profile but can just start fresh.
    >
    > You can't simply rename user accounts; that will only make a cosmetic
    > change
    > and not alter the underlying files/folders/registry entries.
    >
    > Malke
    > --
    > MS-MVP
    > Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
    > FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ
    >
    It looks like this was it. I selected another id on the XP Pro system and
    defined the same userid/password on the Vista machine and now things work as
    expected. Whew!

    I can't tell you how glad I am you were aware, and made me aware, of this
    possible conflict. I got no error or warning message when I created the
    "default" id on the Vista machine. And I think I could have researched this
    problem forever without coming across this.

    Thank you again for sticking with me on this and coming up with the answer.
    I really appreciate it.

    Bob


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