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windows\system32\config\regback\software

  1. #11



    Member
    Join Date : Jul 2008
    Posts : 11
    Slackware64
    Local Time: 10:51 AM


     

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    Also there is a BIOS update at the HP website for the m9350f.
    Mine was version 5.22
    The new one is 5.24

    Not sure if that is a fix or not but everything went smooth during the update here.

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  3. #12


    AlanX Guest

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software


    Hi Guys,

    I was just browsing to find out what the hell RegBack was as my HDD was
    going mad.

    I'm running Vista Home Premium 64 on a custom built rig so I dont think
    it is anything to do with you guys having HP machines.

    Mine only takes about 5 mins to run though. Not hours like you guys
    said although my system is heavily overclocked.

    Try backing up all your media and doing a fresh installation of Vista.
    It sounds like your registries are full of rubish from having Vista
    installed for too long without a good clean-up.
    Alternatively, try installing a good reg clean-up tool.

    The more rubbish and the more fragmented your registry becomes, the
    slower Windows and regback will run.


    --
    AlanX
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    AlanX's Profile: http://forums.techarena.in/members/alanx.htm
    View this thread: http://forums.techarena.in/windows-v...ce/1041955.htm

    http://forums.techarena.in


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  4. #13



    Newbie
    Join Date : Sep 2008
    Posts : 8
    Vista Home Premium 64
    Local Time: 11:51 AM


     

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    Hey! I don't believe it but the HP fix worked! I watched my system closely this morning and when regback started running it didn't hog the disk read/write. I launched several apps to test performance and everything worked fine. Also, regback only ran a couple minutes this time. Perhaps one of the vista hot fixes HP gave me did the trick after all. Try following the directions in my previous post (Note -At least one update was a driver for my video card so only do what makes sense on your machine).

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  5. #14



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    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    One other thing I should mention. A friend of mine gave me a good idea to try. If the problem persisted and I couldn't resolve my next step was to change my time zone on Friday nights to trick the system to run regback in the middle of the night. Banjo, Might be worth a try if the HP fix doesn't work for you.

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  6. #15



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    Join Date : Sep 2008
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      Thread Starter

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    GREAT NEWS , I just sent HP an e-mail to validate if I can add the same hot fixes to my HP Pavilion Elite m9250f PC in an attempt to resolve the regback performance problem.

    Thank you

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  7. #16
    Barman58's Avatar

    Post No Evil ;)



    Join Date : Jul 2008
    Newport, South Wales, UK
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    Windows 8.1.1 ;)
    Local Time: 04:51 PM
    uk uk wales

     

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the other takes over
    Hi Banjo,

    Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup option you may want


    • RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all disks will be lost if any one disk fails.


    • RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution, using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive, in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining drives (second, third, etc).


    • RAID 5 (striped disks with parity) combines three or more disks in a way that protects data against loss of any one disk; the storage capacity of the array is reduced by one disk.


    • RAID 6 (less common) can recover from the loss of two disks.


    • RAID 10 (or 1+0) uses both striping and mirroring.


    above from the article in Wikipedia
    RAID - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    As to the scheduling of this backup you may be able to alter the schedule in task scheduler

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  8. #17


    Ken Blake, MVP Guest

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 14:38:53 -0500, barman58 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
    wrote:

    >

    > > I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the
    > > other takes overHi Banjo,
    >
    > Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup
    > option you may want
    >
    >
    >
    > - RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a
    > way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all
    > disks will be lost if any one disk fails.

    That's correct, except that in practice RAID 0 usually proves either
    *no* improved speed or such a tiny amount that it can be ignored. The
    one thing it mostly does is dramatically increase the risk to what's
    on the drives; that tiny increase in performance (if any) is not worth
    the greatly increased risk.



    > - RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution,

    I completely disagree.

    Most people completely misunderstand what RAID 1 is all about.
    RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or more
    drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy, not
    backup. It's used in situations (almost always within corporations,
    not in homes) where any downtime can't be tolerated, because the way
    it works is that if one drive fails the other takes over seamlessly
    and almost instantly.

    Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup technique, that is
    *not* what it is, since it's subject to simultaneous loss of the
    original and the mirror to many of the most common dangers threatening
    your data--severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, user
    errors, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most companies that
    use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in place.


    Read my thoughts on backup here:
    http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=314

    Also read here: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea
    http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29


    > using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that
    > data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the
    > array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive,
    > in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase
    > the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining
    > drives (second, third, etc).
    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  9. #18



    Newbie
    Join Date : Sep 2008
    Posts : 8
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      Thread Starter

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    Hello Nigel,

    Thank you, I stand corrected I have RAID 1 applied the (2) 500GB Drives act as (1) Drive, I am using the Intel Matrix Storage Console that is part of my HP PC. If (1) drive fails I am protected.

    Thank you,

    Jeff

    Quote Originally Posted by barman58 View Post
    I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the other takes over
    Hi Banjo,

    Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup option you may want


    • RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all disks will be lost if any one disk fails.

    • RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution, using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive, in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining drives (second, third, etc).

    • RAID 5 (striped disks with parity) combines three or more disks in a way that protects data against loss of any one disk; the storage capacity of the array is reduced by one disk.

    • RAID 6 (less common) can recover from the loss of two disks.

    • RAID 10 (or 1+0) uses both striping and mirroring.

    above from the article in Wikipedia
    RAID - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    As to the scheduling of this backup you may be able to alter the schedule in task scheduler

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  10. #19



    Newbie
    Join Date : Sep 2008
    Posts : 8
    Vista Home Premium 64
    Local Time: 11:51 AM


      Thread Starter

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    Hello Ken

    Thank you, I have RAID 1, I have (2) 500GB Drives but they act as (1) so if the primary hard drive fails the secondary drive takes over.

    Thanks

    Jeff

    Quote Originally Posted by Janx View Post
    I just sent an email to HP support to see if they can help. I'll let you know what they say.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Blake, MVP View Post
    On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 14:38:53 -0500, barman58 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
    wrote:
    >
    > > I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the
    > > other takes overHi Banjo,
    >
    > Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup
    > option you may want
    >
    >
    >
    > - RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a
    > way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all
    > disks will be lost if any one disk fails.

    That's correct, except that in practice RAID 0 usually proves either
    *no* improved speed or such a tiny amount that it can be ignored. The
    one thing it mostly does is dramatically increase the risk to what's
    on the drives; that tiny increase in performance (if any) is not worth
    the greatly increased risk.


    > - RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution,

    I completely disagree.

    Most people completely misunderstand what RAID 1 is all about.
    RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or more
    drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy, not
    backup. It's used in situations (almost always within corporations,
    not in homes) where any downtime can't be tolerated, because the way
    it works is that if one drive fails the other takes over seamlessly
    and almost instantly.

    Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup technique, that is
    *not* what it is, since it's subject to simultaneous loss of the
    original and the mirror to many of the most common dangers threatening
    your data--severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, user
    errors, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most companies that
    use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in place.


    Read my thoughts on backup here:
    Back Up Your Computer Regularly and Reliably

    Also read here: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea
    Puget Custom Computers: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea

    > using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that
    > data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the
    > array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive,
    > in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase
    > the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining
    > drives (second, third, etc).
    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

  11. #20


    Ken Blake, MVP Guest

    Re: windows\system32\config\regback\software

    On Sun, 5 Oct 2008 13:17:09 -0500, Banjo200 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
    wrote:

    >
    > Hello Ken
    >
    > Thank you, I have RAID 1, I have (2) 500GB Drives but they act as (1)
    > so if the primary hard drive fails the secondary drive takes over.

    You're welcome. But if the purpose of having RAID1 is as backup, as I
    said earlier, it's a very poor approach to backup.

    In fact, my view is that RAID1 is almost never a good thing for a home
    user to do.



    > Janx;847800 Wrote:

    > > I just sent an email to HP support to see if they can help. I'll let you
    > > know what they say.
    >
    > Ken Blake, MVP;852705 Wrote:

    > > On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 14:38:53 -0500, barman58 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
    > > wrote:

    > > > > >
    > > > >> > > > >
    > > > > > > I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails
    > > > > the
    > > > > > > other takes overHi Banjo,> > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the
    > > > backup
    > > > > option you may want
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > - RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in
    > > > a
    > > > > way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on
    > > > all
    > > > > disks will be lost if any one disk fails. > >
    > >
    > >
    > > That's correct, except that in practice RAID 0 usually proves either
    > > *no* improved speed or such a tiny amount that it can be ignored. The
    > > one thing it mostly does is dramatically increase the risk to what's
    > > on the drives; that tiny increase in performance (if any) is not
    > > worth
    > > the greatly increased risk.
    > >
    > >

    > > > > >
    > > > > - RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution, > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I completely disagree.
    > >
    > > Most people completely misunderstand what RAID 1 is all about.
    > > RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or
    > > more
    > > drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy, not
    > > backup. It's used in situations (almost always within corporations,
    > > not in homes) where any downtime can't be tolerated, because the way
    > > it works is that if one drive fails the other takes over seamlessly
    > > and almost instantly.
    > >
    > > Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup technique, that is
    > > *not* what it is, since it's subject to simultaneous loss of the
    > > original and the mirror to many of the most common dangers
    > > threatening
    > > your data--severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, user
    > > errors, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most companies
    > > that
    > > use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in place.
    > >
    > >
    > > Read my thoughts on backup here:
    > > 'Back Up Your Computer Regularly and Reliably'
    > > (http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=314)
    > >
    > > Also read here: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea
    > > 'Puget Custom Computers: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea'
    > > (http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29)
    > >

    > > > > >
    > > > > using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that
    > > > > data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the
    > > > > array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one
    > > > drive,
    > > > > in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase
    > > > > the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining
    > > > > drives (second, third, etc). > >
    > >
    > > --
    > > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    > > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
    >
    >
    > --
    > Banjo200
    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
    Please Reply to the Newsgroup

      My System SpecsSystem Spec

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