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battery plugged in, not charging

J

jennifer b

#1
I am currently using a laptop that is approx one year old - it's a toshiba
tecra A6. It belonged to a friend and I have only received it recently, so I
do not know its history. When I hover above the 'power plan' icon on the
bottom toolbar, it says "0% available, (plugged in, not charging)" and,
accordingly, cannot run the computer on battery power. Is this definitely a
problem with the computer's battery, despite it being only one year old?
--
jennifer b
 

My Computer

M

Malke

#2
jennifer b wrote:

> I am currently using a laptop that is approx one year old - it's a toshiba
> tecra A6. It belonged to a friend and I have only received it recently, so
> I do not know its history. When I hover above the 'power plan' icon on the
> bottom toolbar, it says "0% available, (plugged in, not charging)" and,
> accordingly, cannot run the computer on battery power. Is this definitely
> a problem with the computer's battery, despite it being only one year old?
It could be a problem with:

1. The laptop's battery
2. The laptop's AC adapter
3. The charger component on the laptop's motherboard

Contact Toshiba tech support for repair/replacement.

Malke
--
MS-MVP
Elephant Boy Computers
www.elephantboycomputers.com
Don't Panic!
 

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D

diana

#4
So would this also be true if it does charge as long as the lid is down?
Toshiba laptop as well. Seems like it might be a setting in Windows that
when it is open, don't charge but closed charge??

"Malke" wrote:

> jennifer b wrote:
>

> > I am currently using a laptop that is approx one year old - it's a toshiba
> > tecra A6. It belonged to a friend and I have only received it recently, so
> > I do not know its history. When I hover above the 'power plan' icon on the
> > bottom toolbar, it says "0% available, (plugged in, not charging)" and,
> > accordingly, cannot run the computer on battery power. Is this definitely
> > a problem with the computer's battery, despite it being only one year old?
>
> It could be a problem with:
>
> 1. The laptop's battery
> 2. The laptop's AC adapter
> 3. The charger component on the laptop's motherboard
>
> Contact Toshiba tech support for repair/replacement.
>
> Malke
> --
> MS-MVP
> Elephant Boy Computers
> www.elephantboycomputers.com
> Don't Panic!
>
 

My Computer

#5
I just had that exact same problem. I was stuck at 11% and I would unplug and plug back in. So, I did what I had to do: mess with my precious laptop ;_; Just kidding. I went to the HP site or http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01174488&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3806991&os=2100&rule=6701〈=en

My battery is now charging. As I type, it went from 11% to 32% and it is plugged in and charging. Says so. So! I hope this solves your problem too. Downloading BIOS files are overrated....Kidding.

For easy access, I'll just use the ol' copy paste method.


  1. Click Start and type device in the search field, then select Device Manager .
  2. Expand the Batteries category.
  3. Under the Batteries category, right-click the Microsoft ACPI Compliant Control Method Battery listing, and select Uninstall .
    WARNING: Do not remove the Microsoft AC Adapter driver or any other ACPI compliant driver.
  4. On the Device Manager taskbar, click Scan for hardware changes
    .
    Alternately, select Action > Scan for hardware changes .

Windows will scan your computer for hardware that doesn't have drivers installed, and will install the drivers needed to manage your battery's power. The notebook should now indicate that the battery is charging.
 

My Computer

#6
For easy access, I'll just use the ol' copy paste method.


  1. Click Start and type device in the search field, then select Device Manager .
  2. Expand the Batteries category.
  3. Under the Batteries category, right-click the Microsoft ACPI Compliant Control Method Battery listing, and select Uninstall .
    WARNING: Do not remove the Microsoft AC Adapter driver or any other ACPI compliant driver.
  4. On the Device Manager taskbar, click Scan for hardware changes .
    Alternately, select Action > Scan for hardware changes .
Windows will scan your computer for hardware that doesn't have drivers installed, and will install the drivers needed to manage your battery's power. The notebook should now indicate that the battery is charging.
I have an Acer less than 6 months old battery is stuck at 96%,i tried the above post and when i uninstalled the acpi complaint driver my battery shot up to 100%,however when i scanned for hardware changes windows reinstalled the device and my battery immediately went back to 96% as before,and still says not charging...hrm..now im stumped has anyone else come up with any thing else?
 

My Computer

#7
I just had that exact same problem. I was stuck at 11% and I would unplug and plug back in. So, I did what I had to do: mess with my precious laptop ;_; Just kidding. I went to the HP site or http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01174488&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3806991&os=2100&rule=6701〈=en

My battery is now charging. As I type, it went from 11% to 32% and it is plugged in and charging. Says so. So! I hope this solves your problem too. Downloading BIOS files are overrated....Kidding.

For easy access, I'll just use the ol' copy paste method.


  1. Click Start and type device in the search field, then select Device Manager .
  2. Expand the Batteries category.
  3. Under the Batteries category, right-click the Microsoft ACPI Compliant Control Method Battery listing, and select Uninstall .
    WARNING: Do not remove the Microsoft AC Adapter driver or any other ACPI compliant driver.
  4. On the Device Manager taskbar, click Scan for hardware changes
    .
    Alternately, select Action > Scan for hardware changes .

Windows will scan your computer for hardware that doesn't have drivers installed, and will install the drivers needed to manage your battery's power. The notebook should now indicate that the battery is charging.
I tried this proceedure and initially the same result battery plugged in and not charging at 48%. So I tried this method again but with a few changes which worked:

With the laptop on and AC power cord plugged in, remove the battery (you may have to gently tilt the laptop up or on its side), then use the device manager to uninstall the drivers (as originally instructed). Wait about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Replace the battery, and return the laptop to an upright position. Use the device manager to scan for new hardware and reinstall the drivers (as originally instructed). After completing these step my battery tray icon indicated Battery Fully Charged 100%
 

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