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Deleted Registry Lines Reappear/Respawn--How to Permanently Get Rid of Them?

S

Susan

#1
Vista 64-bit...

I'm having trouble removing Norton 360 and Norton Ghost from the Vista
64-bit Registry. The normal removal left hundreds of Registry
remnants for both these programs.

I'm using RegScanner which will create a "Delete" name.reg file which
when run will remove all selected lines in that file from the
Registry.

However, after repeating the process I've discovered dozens of line
remnants that were removed have reappeared. I'm wondering if there is
a trick where I can make their removal permanent?

For instance, if I booted from the Vista book disk and go to the
command prompt (what once was called DOS but who knows what it is
now)...could I run this same .reg file and get a permanent effect?
Should I place this file in the same directory where RegEdit is
located and run it from that directory? Or does it need to be where
the Registry files are located? I forget and I've forgotten where
those two Registry files are located actually too--what and where are
they please?

Is there another way to prevent these Registry lines from reappearing?

Thank you.
 

My Computer

P

Peter Foldes

#2
For permanent removal of Norton you need a reformat. You can never get rid of all of
it even with the Norton removal Tool.

http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/tsgeninfo.nsf/docid/2005033108162039

--
Peter

Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.

"Susan" <UCE@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:a7j3n41d041fqpiv6sns5dq5i3dv2be82l@xxxxxx

> Vista 64-bit...
>
> I'm having trouble removing Norton 360 and Norton Ghost from the Vista
> 64-bit Registry. The normal removal left hundreds of Registry
> remnants for both these programs.
>
> I'm using RegScanner which will create a "Delete" name.reg file which
> when run will remove all selected lines in that file from the
> Registry.
>
> However, after repeating the process I've discovered dozens of line
> remnants that were removed have reappeared. I'm wondering if there is
> a trick where I can make their removal permanent?
>
> For instance, if I booted from the Vista book disk and go to the
> command prompt (what once was called DOS but who knows what it is
> now)...could I run this same .reg file and get a permanent effect?
> Should I place this file in the same directory where RegEdit is
> located and run it from that directory? Or does it need to be where
> the Registry files are located? I forget and I've forgotten where
> those two Registry files are located actually too--what and where are
> they please?
>
> Is there another way to prevent these Registry lines from reappearing?
>
> Thank you.
 

My Computer

S

Susan

#3
On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 08:20:10 -0500, "Rick Rogers" <rick@xxxxxx>
wrote:

>Hi Susan,
>
>Try running the program elevated (right click/run as administrator), it
>likely lacks sufficient permissions to remove entries in key branches.
Thanks for the idea Rick. Although I have periodically tried this
with various programs I specifically gave it a try with RegScanner and
the results didn't change any--a certain number continue to either not
be deleted or regenerate.

Do you think there might be some lines that could be identified and
instead of trying to delete them I could modify them in some fashion
using RegEdit and then delete them?

Also, is it possible that these Registry lines that regenerate come
from some other unidentified and unidentifiable source in the Registry
or even in some System folder?

There has to be a better solution to this then 'reformat'. It might
also be possible that I've got the Registry clean enough as it is to
install Kaspersky Ingternet Security 2009 and not have any
difficulties with it?

Currently I'm still using Webroot Security successfully. I have a
number of issues with them but I may continue to use the still
functional for my purposes suite until something is resolved.

Thanks.
 

My Computer

D

Dave-UK

#4
"Susan" <UCE@xxxxxx> wrote in message news:aho4n49ha8o69cmvtaaqm76c93kvf7110a@xxxxxx

> On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 08:20:10 -0500, "Rick Rogers" <rick@xxxxxx>
> wrote:
>

>>Hi Susan,
>>
>>Try running the program elevated (right click/run as administrator), it
>>likely lacks sufficient permissions to remove entries in key branches.
>
> Thanks for the idea Rick. Although I have periodically tried this
> with various programs I specifically gave it a try with RegScanner and
> the results didn't change any--a certain number continue to either not
> be deleted or regenerate.
>
> Do you think there might be some lines that could be identified and
> instead of trying to delete them I could modify them in some fashion
> using RegEdit and then delete them?
>
> Also, is it possible that these Registry lines that regenerate come
> from some other unidentified and unidentifiable source in the Registry
> or even in some System folder?
>
> There has to be a better solution to this then 'reformat'. It might
> also be possible that I've got the Registry clean enough as it is to
> install Kaspersky Ingternet Security 2009 and not have any
> difficulties with it?
>
> Currently I'm still using Webroot Security successfully. I have a
> number of issues with them but I may continue to use the still
> functional for my purposes suite until something is resolved.
>
> Thanks.
If these registry entries are being re-written then there must be a program or process writing them.
It may be useful to examine everything that is loaded when Vista boots.
Autoruns from Sysinternals will show you what is being loaded.
Download it from here:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902.aspx

It doesn't need installing, just unzip and run the autoruns.exe file from the folder.
Right-click and run as admin.
Agree to the license and it will scan your computer listing everything, including loads of Microsoft entries.
Click on Options and select ' Hide Microsoft Entries '.
Click on the green arrows icon to refresh the list.
Now look down the list and see if you can recognise any Norton/Symantec entries.
Clear the box to disable or right-click to delete any entries.

Good luck.
 

My Computer

S

Susan

#5
On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 23:43:10 -0000, "Dave-UK" <here@xxxxxx> wrote:

>If these registry entries are being re-written then there must be a program or process writing them.
>It may be useful to examine everything that is loaded when Vista boots.
>Autoruns from Sysinternals will show you what is being loaded.
>Download it from here:
>http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb963902.aspx
>
>It doesn't need installing, just unzip and run the autoruns.exe file from the folder.
>Right-click and run as admin.
>Agree to the license and it will scan your computer listing everything, including loads of Microsoft entries.
>Click on Options and select ' Hide Microsoft Entries '.
>Click on the green arrows icon to refresh the list.
>Now look down the list and see if you can recognise any Norton/Symantec entries.
>Clear the box to disable or right-click to delete any entries.
>
>Good luck.
Autoruns worked great Dave-UK. But 'Everything' found only one
reference to 'Norton' concerning Sidebar gadgets. I think I should
turn my attention to Registry remnants that maybe are not really being
re-written but just locked. You said in someone else's post I was in
recently:

"Registry Keys are listed in the left pane of Regedit, and Names and
their values are listed in the right pane. So 'Windows Live Mail' is
a Key but 'SpoolerDlgPos' is a Name, ( with a certain value.) I don't
think you can set permissions on Names, only on Keys. And changing
the permissions of the ' Widows Live Mail ' key will probably screw
something up."

I'm going to look next at some of these keys using the 'Norton 360'
search which only has 18 that do not go away. If a key contains names
and/or values associated with more then 'Norton 360' like other
program names I'm thinking I might not want to delete it and that that
is/was a good reason to have 'locked' it? I recall now I think seeing
such a situation in my searching. Could the offending 'Norton 360' be
removed from the Names side (right side) leaving the Key otherwise
intact? And if I did modify a Key this way I think I think afterwards
I should 'Lock' it again?

Just in case you too are wondering... I've been doing an incremental
backup and creating restore points prior to deleting Keys. And in
case it was lost somewhere I am using RegScanner to find these
instances and attempting to delete them using the Create Delete .Reg
File option under File. I'll start off with the files that look
straight forward and report back for everyone's interest. :)
 

My Computer

S

Susan

#6
On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 23:13:50 -0800, Susan <UCE@xxxxxx> wrote:

>I'm going to look next at some of these keys using the 'Norton 360'
>search which only has 18 that do not go away. If a key contains names
>and/or values associated with more then 'Norton 360' like other
>program names I'm thinking I might not want to delete it and that that
>is/was a good reason to have 'locked' it? I recall now I think seeing
>such a situation in my searching. Could the offending 'Norton 360' be
>removed from the Names side (right side) leaving the Key otherwise
>intact? And if I did modify a Key this way I think I think afterwards
>I should 'Lock' it again?
But wait... What Permission should I use? There are categories:
Creator/Owner, System, Administrator, and User. I don't think I am
the creator/owner but that category has Full Control checked but
grayed-out. I'm not the System. I am the Admin but Full Control is
already checked and grayed. I don't think checking Full Control under
User makes sense if I'm the admin. Can someone give me a lesson on
this please?

If I am the admin giving myself permission when I run Regedit and I
right click on a Key that shows the admin has full control with a
grayed-out check mark in the box does that mean that that Key is
'Unlocked' and its contents modified? I hope so. But I thought I was
doing this all along when I attempted to delete some right pane
contents of a Key since I ran RegScanner with admin permission.

After leaving RegScanner I would next run the 'delete.reg' files
though. I didn't/couldn't run these files as admin though. Maybe I
have to do them manually in Regedit! Something to try tomorrow!
 

My Computer

S

Susan

#7
On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 23:13:50 -0800, Susan <UCE@xxxxxx> wrote:

>Autoruns worked great Dave-UK. But 'Everything' found only one
>reference to 'Norton' concerning Sidebar gadgets.
Forgot one other thing I noticed in the Autoruns findings. Several of
the categories had many "File Not Found: System 32..." findings. Can
all of these be removed or do I need learn which ones can and which
ones can't or none of them can? Are these files that are missing from
the System 32 directory that should be present? If they aren't needed
should I do something else more proper to make them disappear? I'm
not aware of any system or program problems at the moment.

Thanks.
 

My Computer

D

Dave-UK

#8
"Susan" <UCE@xxxxxx> wrote in message news:tvo5n4ht9alpsin01r4pukf0dplpqakmp3@xxxxxx

> On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 23:13:50 -0800, Susan <UCE@xxxxxx> wrote:
>

>>Autoruns worked great Dave-UK. But 'Everything' found only one
>>reference to 'Norton' concerning Sidebar gadgets.
>
> Forgot one other thing I noticed in the Autoruns findings. Several of
> the categories had many "File Not Found: System 32..." findings. Can
> all of these be removed or do I need learn which ones can and which
> ones can't or none of them can? Are these files that are missing from
> the System 32 directory that should be present? If they aren't needed
> should I do something else more proper to make them disappear? I'm
> not aware of any system or program problems at the moment.
>
> Thanks.
The 'File not found ' entries can be deleted as they reference a file no longer present.
If you have no system or program problems then leave the other 'locked' registry entries alone.
Don't change any permissions.
 

My Computer

S

Susan

#9
On Sat, 17 Jan 2009 08:59:59 -0500, "Peter Foldes"
<okf122@xxxxxx> wrote:

>For permanent removal of Norton you need a reformat. You can never get rid of all of
>it even with the Norton removal Tool.
>
>http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/tsgeninfo.nsf/docid/2005033108162039
Hi Peter,

Technically you will likely win this argument if I actually want to
remove every trace of Symantec products once installed without
reformatting the hdd. However I will stop short of doing that and
leave remnants. There are two other areas of Registry editing I need
to learn more about which I will post about later today.
 

My Computer

S

Susan

#10
I think this is the last part of my Registry cleaning technique
questioning--with any luck...

Is it a weakness of the Registry that it must continue to grow
without bounds as programs are installed and removed? The only
recourse an admin has is to periodically (once a year) do a clean
install or restore an image or restore points and reconfigure programs
and data.

Has MS or a 3rd party written a tool that would load a registry
binary string, search for and remove certain unneeded parts no longer
installed or used, and then save the edited binary string otherwise
intact? Right now, even though I have removed everything I can using
Registry Scanner that is Symantec or Webroot related, for instance, I
still have numerous lines of REG BINARY and other Registry lines and
old Notification Area hidden icons/messages related to the Symantec
and Webroot products I once ran.

There are way to many lines to manually edit out part of a binary
string to be practical. Why if a program install can write in binary
strings can't a program's uninstall remove these same strings?

Thank you.
 

My Computer

M

Malke

#12
Susan wrote:


> Is it a weakness of the Registry that it must continue to grow
> without bounds as programs are installed and removed?
No. Most programs uninstall cleanly, including their registry entries. In
any case, having some extra registry entries will not impact the operating
system at all. It did in Win98/ME but not in XP/Vista.

> The only
> recourse an admin has is to periodically (once a year) do a clean
> install or restore an image or restore points and reconfigure programs
> and data.
Not necessary at all. If your operating system is getting messed up, it
isn't because of the registry. It's because of poor computing practices. I
can't remember the last time I reinstalled my XP box and it is just as fast
as it was on the day I installed it.

> Has MS or a 3rd party written a tool that would load a registry
> binary string,
(with snippage) - See this link for why registry cleaners are A Bad Thing:

http://aumha.net/viewtopic.php?t=28099 - registry cleaner thread

> There are way to many lines to manually edit out part of a binary
> string to be practical. Why if a program install can write in binary
> strings can't a program's uninstall remove these same strings?
You would have to ask the program's tech support why their programmers can't
write a good uninstaller.

Malke
--
MS-MVP
Elephant Boy Computers - Don't Panic!
FAQ - http://www.elephantboycomputers.com/#FAQ
 

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K

Ken Blake, MVP

#13
On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 03:12:42 -0800, Susan <UCE@xxxxxx> wrote:

> I think this is the last part of my Registry cleaning technique
> questioning--with any luck...
>
> Is it a weakness of the Registry that it must continue to grow
> without bounds as programs are installed and removed?

First, it's only an occasional program that doesn't get all its
registry entries removed when the program is uninstalled. Many
uninstallations don't have that problem.

Second, if an uninstallation leaves some registry entries behind, it
normally makes a very small difference to the total size of the
registry, so the phrase "grow without bounds" is a great
overstatement. Yes, the registry usually continues to grow as programs
are installed and uninstalled, because not all uninstallations are
perfect, but almost never does it get so big that a problem results
from it.

Other than using a tiny amount of extra disk space, having leftover
unused items in the registry doesn't hurt you at all, and it's
entirely unnecessary to try to remove them.



> The only
> recourse an admin has is to periodically (once a year) do a clean
> install

Ugh! That's entirely unnecessary, and almost always a very bad course
of action for most people. Here's my standard post on this subject:

With a modicum of care, it should never be necessary to reinstall
Windows (XP or any other version). I've run Windows 3.0, 3.1, WFWG
3.11, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and now
Windows Vista, each for the period of time before the next version
came out, and each on two or more machines here. I never reinstalled
any of them, and I have never had anything more than an occasional
minor problem.

It's my belief that this mistaken notion stems from the technical
support people at many of the larger OEMs. Their solution to almost
any problem they don't quickly know the answer to is "reformat and
reinstall." That's the perfect solution for them. It gets you off the
phone quickly, it almost always works, and it doesn't require them to
do any real troubleshooting (a skill that most of them obviously don't
possess in any great degree).

But it leaves you with all the work and all the problems. You have to
restore all your data backups, you have to reinstall all your
programs, you have to reinstall all the Windows and application
updates, you have to locate and install all the needed drivers for
your system, you have to recustomize Windows and all your apps to work
the way you're comfortable with.

Besides all those things being time-consuming and troublesome, you may
have trouble with some of them: can you find all your application CDs?
Can you find all the needed installation codes? Do you have data
backups to restore? Do you even remember all the customizations and
tweaks you may have installed to make everything work the way you
like? Occasionally there are problems that are so difficult to solve
that Windows should be reinstalled cleanly. But they are few and far
between; reinstallation should not be a substitute for
troubleshooting; it should be a last resort, to be done only after all
other attempts at troubleshooting by a qualified person have failed.

And perhaps most important: if you reformat and reinstall without
finding out what caused your problem, you will very likely repeat the
behavior that caused it, and quickly find yourself back in exactly the
same situation.



> or restore an image or restore points and reconfigure programs
> and data.

Entirely unnecessary.


> Has MS or a 3rd party written a tool that would load a registry
> binary string, search for and remove certain unneeded parts no longer
> installed or used, and then save the edited binary string otherwise
> intact? Right now, even though I have removed everything I can using
> Registry Scanner that is Symantec or Webroot related, for instance, I
> still have numerous lines of REG BINARY and other Registry lines and
> old Notification Area hidden icons/messages related to the Symantec
> and Webroot products I once ran.
>
> There are way to many lines to manually edit out part of a binary
> string to be practical. Why if a program install can write in binary
> strings can't a program's uninstall remove these same strings?
>
> Thank you.
--
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
 

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S

Susan

#14
On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 04:57:03 -0800, Malke <malke@xxxxxx>
wrote:

>Susan wrote:

>> Is it a weakness of the Registry that it must continue to grow
>> without bounds as programs are installed and removed?

>No. Most programs uninstall cleanly, including their registry entries. In
>any case, having some extra registry entries will not impact the operating
>system at all. It did in Win98/ME but not in XP/Vista.
Some extra several hundred lines?

>> The only
>> recourse an admin has is to periodically (once a year) do a clean
>> install or restore an image or restore points and reconfigure programs
>> and data.

>Not necessary at all. If your operating system is getting messed up, it
>isn't because of the registry. It's because of poor computing practices. I
>can't remember the last time I reinstalled my XP box and it is just as fast
>as it was on the day I installed it.
....Then do you avoid/fix the OS 'messed up' problem by removing
program conflicts that might develop by removing the program; using
Vista's Disk Cleanup; Checking and fixing errors; and Defrag?

>> Has MS or a 3rd party written a tool that would load a registry
>> binary string,

>(with snippage) - See this link for why registry cleaners are A Bad Thing:
>
>http://aumha.net/viewtopic.php?t=28099 - registry cleaner thread
It does prove one thing I think... MS has a very serious issue with
its Registry and/or software developers writing really decent
uninstall programs. All these registry cleanup programs, sort of like
malware just aren't going to disappear and go away until the problem
goes away. And you are going to always be fighting it.

What I'd like is a clean and compressed Registry and a clean Explorer
folder/file structure regardless of whether it speeds things up a ms
or fixes any problem.

It is too bad some rules and certification can't be set where
developers are 'forced' to provide uninstall programs that really
uninstall everything they add or running/using their program
subsequently adds into the Registry EVEN if MS has to make some
Registry/Windows changes to facilitate this; that a complete uninstall
of a program can only be done by an admin and that it must include all
user accounts, i.e., an end user could uninstall a program they no
longer use but it cannot affect other users and they cannot touch the
Registry.

I think in this day and age that asks to much with huge hdds and
memory no longer any issue. Why care about sloppy code and a messy
Registry so long as it can be kept bandaged and working like there was
nothing wrong.

Let's give this a breather...

I need to figure out how to get Windows Defender's tray icon to show
'Always' again.

>> There are way to many lines to manually edit out part of a binary
>> string to be practical. Why if a program install can write in binary
>> strings can't a program's uninstall remove these same strings?

>You would have to ask the program's tech support why their programmers can't
>write a good uninstaller.
>
>Malke
A sad sad solution today for an end user but not for a PC magazine or
for Microsoft to ask all developers? I wish they would. Symantec,
for instance, HAS written a program independent Uninstall. They
recommend running it several times in succession which I have. It
still leaves the same number of Registry remnants in place and still
leaves their old System Tray messages.

~<Susan>~
 

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S

Susan

#15
On Mon, 26 Jan 2009 12:28:05 -0700, "Ken Blake, MVP"
<kblake@xxxxxx> wrote:

>First, it's only an occasional program that doesn't get all its
>registry entries removed when the program is uninstalled. Many
>uninstallations don't have that problem.
This I simply don't believe. For a long time of removing many
different kinds of applications I can't think of one that really
cleaned itself from the Registry. I've done many Regedit searches for
program remnants. I thought Webroot was a clean uninstall but after
using Regedit or Registry Scanner found many remnants. Symantec
product remnants are filthy throughout the Registry. And they can't
even write their own program independent Uninstall to clean it up.
Both Webroot and Symantec 360 and Ghost were removed recently. And
both have left remnants in the Registry that leave old system tray
notification messages--not visible but hidden.

Maybe it doesn't matter but it would be nice!

>Second, if an uninstallation leaves some registry entries behind, it
>normally makes a very small difference to the total size of the
>registry, so the phrase "grow without bounds" is a great
>overstatement. Yes, the registry usually continues to grow as programs
>are installed and uninstalled, because not all uninstallations are
>perfect, but almost never does it get so big that a problem results
>from it.
I would replace 'not all' with 'not many' from my experiences so far
with Vista. I think Microsoft has human nature working against them
too. If uninstalls were really clean the numerous good and bad
Registry cleaners would disappear. Clearly there are many reasons why
systems and applications get bogged down that may not or don't relate
to the Registry at all but I don't think Microsoft is doing a good job
proving that.

>Other than using a tiny amount of extra disk space, having leftover
>unused items in the registry doesn't hurt you at all, and it's
>entirely unnecessary to try to remove them.
Well, I leave a little dust around my house all the time. I never get
it all up and I have a minor dust allergy too. Who cares? I would
like to see the unused system tray icons/messages, even though they
are hidden, cleaned up. Is that asking to much?

Susan said:

>> The only recourse an admin has is to periodically (once a year) do a clean
>> install.
I don't do this myself until something really goes snafu. I hate
reinstalling an OS. But I hate seeing leftovers anywhere and there's
the rub...

>With a modicum of care, it should never be necessary to reinstall
>Windows (XP or any other version). I've run Windows 3.0, 3.1, WFWG
>3.11, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP, and now
>Windows Vista, each for the period of time before the next version
>came out, and each on two or more machines here. I never reinstalled
>any of them, and I have never had anything more than an occasional
>minor problem.
I agree. It should absolutely work this way and I may be successful
at it for the first time if my system lasts as well as it has till
Windows 7 is released. BTW, it would be nice to buy a full OEM
version of Windows 7 (Vista Ultimate 64-bit equivalent) for <$100. :)
[Smiley means 'when pigs fly'.]

>It's my belief that this mistaken notion stems from the technical
>support people at many of the larger OEMs. Their solution to almost
>any problem they don't quickly know the answer to is "reformat and
>reinstall." That's the perfect solution for them. It gets you off the
>phone quickly, it almost always works, and it doesn't require them to
>do any real troubleshooting (a skill that most of them obviously don't
>possess in any great degree).
Wholeheartedly agree! But the problem really stems from offshore
support, communication problems, and these techs living out of and
having a 3-ring binder troubleshooting mentality--that isn't their
fault.

>But it leaves you with all the work and all the problems. You have to
>restore all your data backups, you have to reinstall all your
>programs, you have to reinstall all the Windows and application
>updates, you have to locate and install all the needed drivers for
>your system, you have to recustomize Windows and all your apps to work
>the way you're comfortable with.
Exactly! Why doesn't MS or a 3rd party develop a clean install
program the end user periodically updates and keeps on hand that
incorporates the installation of the latest drivers, latest programs,
latest data, latest updates, and your recent Desktop and other
configurations? Burn it all to a CD/DVD. Run that media which takes
the user through setting up the hdd, formatting only C:\, laying out
the OS, and prompting you for program, data, and configuration stuff?
It could even glean what it needs to find from your latest image copy
but would, of course, only add folders and Registry entries needed.
Heck, do this for the first OS install or for an OS update even. Heck,
I'd pay another hundred dollars for a program that would take me
through updating to Windows 7 and be done with programs and
configuring _everything_ in several hours instead of several days.

The idea of an install/update going through your last image with your
input is a cool idea--no?

>And perhaps most important: if you reformat and reinstall without
>finding out what caused your problem, you will very likely repeat the
>behavior that caused it, and quickly find yourself back in exactly the
>same situation.
But you would quickly know the real problem and real solution then and
might not have to correct your installation DVD and reinstall. You
might be willing to live with some remnants in the Registry and the
like knowing there was a relatively quick/clean reinstallation you
could fall back on at your convenience rather then a perhaps several
day nightmare?

My conclusions and we can let this thread die if you like:

I think Microsoft needs to focus more on getting developers to write
really clean uninstall programs.

I think just like your adding Windows Defender (which btw I have a
missing tray icon problem with--being covered in another thread)
Microsoft should include in Windows 7 Registry cleanup and compression
tools (for those who just plan old like to use them regularly or on
occasion) that are safe, don't goes as deep as they could, and always,
without choice, make the necessary backups that would integrate into
the Backup/System Restore Center.

I'm not convinced putting together fancy video introductions of What's
New in Windows 7 is the answer. They never cover enough information
to satisfy me. Much better or as an option might be reading several
very interactive pages covering all primary features of Windows 7--not
just what's new or different.

I remain looking forward to a better OS day.

~<Susan>~
 

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