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External USB drive not recognized by Vista

N

NoSPAM

#1
I recently purchased an HP laptop running Vista Home Premium Edition to
replace a desktop machine running Windows XP that died of a motherboard
failure. Naturally I would like to recover the data from the old computer's
hard disk. I purchased an external drive enclosure (SYBA) with a USB
interface for this task. However I could not assign a drive letter for this
drive, nor could Vista recognize anything about the drive other than the
Device Manager recognized it correctly as a "Maxtor 6Y160P0 USB Device". I
gave the drive and enclosure to my brother-in-law who had an XP machine to
see if he could read it. Again, a drive letter could not be assigned. He
suggested that I run the Seagate/Maxtor drive diagnostics downloadable from
the Seagate website. Using SeaTools for Windows, I was able to run both the
short and long generic tests on the drive with the drive passing both tests.
My brother-in-law then said he had once read something about drives that are
bootable not being able to be read by XP or Vista when they are used as
external drives; unfortunately he could not remember where he had read this.
In fact, my old drive was the boot disk on my old computer, and it was
partitioned into four logical disks. He then suggested that I try
partitioning and recovery software on the drive.

I am hesitant to try such software until I can confirm that a drive with
boot sectors cannot be read as an external drive by Vista. Since there is
considerable valuable data and software on the old drive, I do not wish to
be tinkering with the drive without knowing more. I am open to suggestions
from the experts on this newsgroup as to where to go next. In case it is
needed I also have a USB-to-IDE cable to use in case the Syba enclosure
might be the problem. Suggestions on which recovery software tools are best
would also be useful.

Thanks in advance for any help. If replying directly, please delete the
eights from my email address. Having been on Usenet since 1983, I am well
aware of the "harvesting" of email addresses by spammers. In the "dark
ages" I could read every message in every newsgroup in less than two hours!

Barry sweetwillie28@xxxxxx
 

My Computer

R

Richard Urban

#2
Hooking the drive up as a slave drive, and scanning it with recovery
software that is run from a boot disk (not from an installed operating
system) is not going to change the scanned drive in any way. You will just
see what files are recoverable by that particular recovery program. Then -
act accordingly!

--

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience


"NoSPAM" <unknown@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:OvqugFHPJHA.4144@xxxxxx

>I recently purchased an HP laptop running Vista Home Premium Edition to
>replace a desktop machine running Windows XP that died of a motherboard
>failure. Naturally I would like to recover the data from the old
>computer's hard disk. I purchased an external drive enclosure (SYBA) with
>a USB interface for this task. However I could not assign a drive letter
>for this drive, nor could Vista recognize anything about the drive other
>than the Device Manager recognized it correctly as a "Maxtor 6Y160P0 USB
>Device". I gave the drive and enclosure to my brother-in-law who had an XP
>machine to see if he could read it. Again, a drive letter could not be
>assigned. He suggested that I run the Seagate/Maxtor drive diagnostics
>downloadable from the Seagate website. Using SeaTools for Windows, I was
>able to run both the short and long generic tests on the drive with the
>drive passing both tests. My brother-in-law then said he had once read
>something about drives that are bootable not being able to be read by XP or
>Vista when they are used as external drives; unfortunately he could not
>remember where he had read this. In fact, my old drive was the boot disk on
>my old computer, and it was partitioned into four logical disks. He then
>suggested that I try partitioning and recovery software on the drive.
>
> I am hesitant to try such software until I can confirm that a drive with
> boot sectors cannot be read as an external drive by Vista. Since there is
> considerable valuable data and software on the old drive, I do not wish to
> be tinkering with the drive without knowing more. I am open to
> suggestions from the experts on this newsgroup as to where to go next. In
> case it is needed I also have a USB-to-IDE cable to use in case the Syba
> enclosure might be the problem. Suggestions on which recovery software
> tools are best would also be useful.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help. If replying directly, please delete the
> eights from my email address. Having been on Usenet since 1983, I am well
> aware of the "harvesting" of email addresses by spammers. In the "dark
> ages" I could read every message in every newsgroup in less than two
> hours!
>
> Barry sweetwillie28@xxxxxx
>
 

My Computer

P

Peter Foldes

#3
You need to install that drive as a slave to your new drive .Using an outside enclosure with USB connection will not do for this. When installed as a slave (make sure jumpers are set correctly) you should be able to see the HD with the correct drive letter and then pull your data off from it

--
Peter

Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.

"NoSPAM" <unknown@xxxxxx> wrote in message news:OvqugFHPJHA.4144@xxxxxx

>I recently purchased an HP laptop running Vista Home Premium Edition to
> replace a desktop machine running Windows XP that died of a motherboard
> failure. Naturally I would like to recover the data from the old computer's
> hard disk. I purchased an external drive enclosure (SYBA) with a USB
> interface for this task. However I could not assign a drive letter for this
> drive, nor could Vista recognize anything about the drive other than the
> Device Manager recognized it correctly as a "Maxtor 6Y160P0 USB Device". I
> gave the drive and enclosure to my brother-in-law who had an XP machine to
> see if he could read it. Again, a drive letter could not be assigned. He
> suggested that I run the Seagate/Maxtor drive diagnostics downloadable from
> the Seagate website. Using SeaTools for Windows, I was able to run both the
> short and long generic tests on the drive with the drive passing both tests.
> My brother-in-law then said he had once read something about drives that are
> bootable not being able to be read by XP or Vista when they are used as
> external drives; unfortunately he could not remember where he had read this.
> In fact, my old drive was the boot disk on my old computer, and it was
> partitioned into four logical disks. He then suggested that I try
> partitioning and recovery software on the drive.
>
> I am hesitant to try such software until I can confirm that a drive with
> boot sectors cannot be read as an external drive by Vista. Since there is
> considerable valuable data and software on the old drive, I do not wish to
> be tinkering with the drive without knowing more. I am open to suggestions
> from the experts on this newsgroup as to where to go next. In case it is
> needed I also have a USB-to-IDE cable to use in case the Syba enclosure
> might be the problem. Suggestions on which recovery software tools are best
> would also be useful.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help. If replying directly, please delete the
> eights from my email address. Having been on Usenet since 1983, I am well
> aware of the "harvesting" of email addresses by spammers. In the "dark
> ages" I could read every message in every newsgroup in less than two hours!
>
> Barry sweetwillie28@xxxxxx
>
>
 

My Computer

N

NoSPAM

#4
"Peter Foldes" <okf22@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:eIj0a5IPJHA.1164@xxxxxx

> You need to install that drive as a slave to your new drive .Using an
> outside enclosure with USB
> connection will not do for this. When installed as a slave (make sure
> jumpers are set correctly) you
> should be able to see the HD with the correct drive letter and then pull
> your data off from it
Thanks for your help, Peter, and also Richard. Your reply also answered the
question I had with Richard's answer: what is meant by a slave drive. I
doubt if my laptop will hold the drive but I can add it to my
brother-in-laws XP machine. And as a final demonstration of my ignorance,
why must I boot from a boot disk and avoid an installed operating system
when running recovery software?

Finally, does Vista recognize the boot sector on the old drive and prevent
it from being assigned a logical drive letter, and does anyone recommend any
particular recovery software?

Barry L. Ornitz
 

My Computer

R

Richard Urban

#5
There is always a slim chance that hooking up the drive as a slave to a
functioning operating system "may" cause disk writes to the drive you are
trying to recover from. Will this over write that which you are trying to
recover? Why take the risk! If you create a boot floppy containing the
recovery program there is no risk whatsoever.

--

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience


"NoSPAM" <unknown@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:OEwbbfUPJHA.4496@xxxxxx

> "Peter Foldes" <okf22@xxxxxx> wrote in message
> news:eIj0a5IPJHA.1164@xxxxxx

>> You need to install that drive as a slave to your new drive .Using an
>> outside enclosure with USB
>> connection will not do for this. When installed as a slave (make sure
>> jumpers are set correctly) you
>> should be able to see the HD with the correct drive letter and then pull
>> your data off from it
>
> Thanks for your help, Peter, and also Richard. Your reply also answered
> the question I had with Richard's answer: what is meant by a slave drive.
> I doubt if my laptop will hold the drive but I can add it to my
> brother-in-laws XP machine. And as a final demonstration of my ignorance,
> why must I boot from a boot disk and avoid an installed operating system
> when running recovery software?
>
> Finally, does Vista recognize the boot sector on the old drive and prevent
> it from being assigned a logical drive letter, and does anyone recommend
> any particular recovery software?
>
> Barry L. Ornitz
>
 

My Computer

N

NoSPAM

#6
"Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:%23zo%238%23UPJHA.1148@xxxxxx

> There is always a slim chance that hooking up the drive as a slave to a
> functioning operating system "may" cause disk writes to the drive you are
> trying to recover from. Will this over write that which you are trying to
> recover? Why take the risk! If you create a boot floppy containing the
> recovery program there is no risk whatsoever.
Thanks, Richard. This now makes sense.

Barry
 

My Computer

E

ed315

#7
"NoSPAM" wrote:

> I recently purchased an HP laptop running Vista Home Premium Edition to
> replace a desktop machine running Windows XP that died of a motherboard
> failure. Naturally I would like to recover the data from the old computer's
> hard disk. I purchased an external drive enclosure (SYBA) with a USB
> interface for this task. However I could not assign a drive letter for this
> drive, nor could Vista recognize anything about the drive other than the
> Device Manager recognized it correctly as a "Maxtor 6Y160P0 USB Device". I
> gave the drive and enclosure to my brother-in-law who had an XP machine to
> see if he could read it. Again, a drive letter could not be assigned. He
> suggested that I run the Seagate/Maxtor drive diagnostics downloadable from
> the Seagate website. Using SeaTools for Windows, I was able to run both the
> short and long generic tests on the drive with the drive passing both tests.
> My brother-in-law then said he had once read something about drives that are
> bootable not being able to be read by XP or Vista when they are used as
> external drives; unfortunately he could not remember where he had read this.
> In fact, my old drive was the boot disk on my old computer, and it was
> partitioned into four logical disks. He then suggested that I try
> partitioning and recovery software on the drive.
>
> I am hesitant to try such software until I can confirm that a drive with
> boot sectors cannot be read as an external drive by Vista. Since there is
> considerable valuable data and software on the old drive, I do not wish to
> be tinkering with the drive without knowing more. I am open to suggestions
> from the experts on this newsgroup as to where to go next. In case it is
> needed I also have a USB-to-IDE cable to use in case the Syba enclosure
> might be the problem. Suggestions on which recovery software tools are best
> would also be useful.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help. If replying directly, please delete the
> eights from my email address. Having been on Usenet since 1983, I am well
> aware of the "harvesting" of email addresses by spammers. In the "dark
> ages" I could read every message in every newsgroup in less than two hours!
>
> Barry sweetwillie28@xxxxxx
>
>
>
 

My Computer

E

ed315

#8
I found a solution to a similar problem somewhere else I do not recall .My
thanks to the original author anyway. Try this solution:
-Do not plug the hard drive to the front USBs but to the ones on the back
of your desktop.
Problem is ,the front USBs do not have enough power to actuate the drive.
I hope this works for you

"NoSPAM" wrote:

> I recently purchased an HP laptop running Vista Home Premium Edition to
> replace a desktop machine running Windows XP that died of a motherboard
> failure. Naturally I would like to recover the data from the old computer's
> hard disk. I purchased an external drive enclosure (SYBA) with a USB
> interface for this task. However I could not assign a drive letter for this
> drive, nor could Vista recognize anything about the drive other than the
> Device Manager recognized it correctly as a "Maxtor 6Y160P0 USB Device". I
> gave the drive and enclosure to my brother-in-law who had an XP machine to
> see if he could read it. Again, a drive letter could not be assigned. He
> suggested that I run the Seagate/Maxtor drive diagnostics downloadable from
> the Seagate website. Using SeaTools for Windows, I was able to run both the
> short and long generic tests on the drive with the drive passing both tests.
> My brother-in-law then said he had once read something about drives that are
> bootable not being able to be read by XP or Vista when they are used as
> external drives; unfortunately he could not remember where he had read this.
> In fact, my old drive was the boot disk on my old computer, and it was
> partitioned into four logical disks. He then suggested that I try
> partitioning and recovery software on the drive.
>
> I am hesitant to try such software until I can confirm that a drive with
> boot sectors cannot be read as an external drive by Vista. Since there is
> considerable valuable data and software on the old drive, I do not wish to
> be tinkering with the drive without knowing more. I am open to suggestions
> from the experts on this newsgroup as to where to go next. In case it is
> needed I also have a USB-to-IDE cable to use in case the Syba enclosure
> might be the problem. Suggestions on which recovery software tools are best
> would also be useful.
>
> Thanks in advance for any help. If replying directly, please delete the
> eights from my email address. Having been on Usenet since 1983, I am well
> aware of the "harvesting" of email addresses by spammers. In the "dark
> ages" I could read every message in every newsgroup in less than two hours!
>
> Barry sweetwillie28@xxxxxx
>
>
>
 

My Computer

pauliewalnuts

Chief Flapajaw
Power User
Messages
278
Location
Columbia, MD
#9
I bought a "Speed Metal 2.5" HDD External Case" for the stock 30-Gig Toshiba hard drive from my old Dell Inspiron 1100. I put the drive in. I plugged it in; light lights up, drive spun up and spun down. I said "fine" and finalized the purchase (paid too much, too. The Little Shop of Hardware in Baltimore, MD, are rather pricey. They seem to be nice people, though. 25-percent restocking fee: bleah.).

NExT, I plugged it into another computer, a 32-bit Vista Home Premium rig. Vista recognized a USB Mass Storage Device and assigned it a drive letter, and it showed up in My Computer, but clicking on it to open it brought up the message "please insert a disk into removable drive E:\"

Checking the Device Manager revealed a 'Generic USB Device' in the USB devices with an exclamation point and the message "Windows cannot use this hardware device because it has been prepared for "safe removal" but it has not been removed from the computer (Code 47). To fix this problem, unplug this device from your computer and then plug it in again."

Which is bull**** because it was still plugged in; the drive LED light was on.

But I unplugged it anyway and plugged it back in. Device Manager refreshes, and no joy: still comes up with the error message.

Rebooted with the drive plugged in at bootup and tried again. The same thing happened.

Step One Fix:

SO THEN I unplugged the drive, and then I moved "infcache.1" from c:\windows\inf and renamed it "infcache.1back," and the file is sitting on my desktop right now.

Rebooted with the drive plugged in at bootup and tried again. No joy.

HOWEVER, THIS TIME the error message in Device Manager went away. PROGRESS!:geek: I still couldn't open the drive.:(

(BTW, at this point the infcache.1 file has been yet to be rewritten by Vista.)

Step Two Fix:

So then I unplugged it from its original USB port at the front of the computer and then I plugged it into another USB port on the computer. I figured that maybe that port doesn't have enough power in it, right?

WRONG. It recognized an "USB-to-IDE Device" (which it is, it's an IDE hard drive). Remember, it didn't do this before. So, since it never did this before, and since it never recognized an IDE anything associated with this before, Vista installed a driver for an USB-to-IDE interface of some sort.

AND NOW NO DRIVE LETTER COMES UP AT ALL, THAT USB ERROR MESSAGE IN DEVICE MANAGER IS BACK, AND WARGARBL!
 

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Hewlett-Packard dv6936us
    CPU
    Intel Core 2 Duo "Merom" T5750, 2 GHz, stock clocking
    Motherboard
    stock Quanta 30D2, v.792E
    Memory
    4 GHz, 667 MHz bus speed
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS, stock
    Sound Card
    stock Realtek software-based
    Monitor(s) Displays
    stock 15.4" widescreen
    Screen Resolution
    stock 1280 X 800
    Hard Drives
    stock Toshiba MK2546GSX and a Western Digital 1TB MyBook
    PSU
    stock
    Case
    stock
    Cooling
    stock plus Rocketfish model RF-LAPCOL
    Mouse
    stock Synaptics Pointing Device
    Keyboard
    stock
    Internet Speed
    Ludicrous Speed (~10.9 Mbps, more or less)
    Other Info
    Browser: Namoroka v1.9.2.3666 64-bit build. Computer specs:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01485288&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3747246
    I like chocolate milk!

pauliewalnuts

Chief Flapajaw
Power User
Messages
278
Location
Columbia, MD
#10
I have rebooted and the USB drive is still unrecognized. However, the USB device error message went away. How? I reconfigured the Generic USB Drive in Device Manager for "configured for performance," meaning that it must be 'safely removed' before I can free the port. When it initially was recognized by Vista, it was as a Plug and Play, and this classification seems to have been the only thing prompting the exclamation point next to the Generic USB Device in Device Manager. So that error's gone.

But it still won't open.

The HDD enclosure came with a disk with drivers. However, Vista doesn't recognize any of them in a Device Install, and also the instructions are written by Chinese people (yes, I mean literally: the CD's name is "我的光碟", which is probably Mandarin for "HA YOU'RE A CHUMP").

Instructions on the disk about possible problems:

1. Make sure the USB cable is properly connected to your computer.
2. Make sure the power supply provides enough power.


3. For Windows 98 the driver is installation.
(?WTF?)
4. Some hard disk must be set to master mode.

5. Delete the “USB Mass Storage Device” from the “USB Controller”

I'm going to try Number Five now because I have no idea how to do Number Four. Of course, I'm going to restart.
 

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Hewlett-Packard dv6936us
    CPU
    Intel Core 2 Duo "Merom" T5750, 2 GHz, stock clocking
    Motherboard
    stock Quanta 30D2, v.792E
    Memory
    4 GHz, 667 MHz bus speed
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS, stock
    Sound Card
    stock Realtek software-based
    Monitor(s) Displays
    stock 15.4" widescreen
    Screen Resolution
    stock 1280 X 800
    Hard Drives
    stock Toshiba MK2546GSX and a Western Digital 1TB MyBook
    PSU
    stock
    Case
    stock
    Cooling
    stock plus Rocketfish model RF-LAPCOL
    Mouse
    stock Synaptics Pointing Device
    Keyboard
    stock
    Internet Speed
    Ludicrous Speed (~10.9 Mbps, more or less)
    Other Info
    Browser: Namoroka v1.9.2.3666 64-bit build. Computer specs:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01485288&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3747246
    I like chocolate milk!
T

THE C. [MSFT MVP]

#11
take a look at these links:
http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/Help/ada5519d-850d-465d-a6a7-598fa2f110521033.mspx

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/268019

--
Computer/Software Tech.

Make it a great day!

Charles Richmond




"pauliewalnuts" wrote:

>
> I have rebooted and the USB drive is still unrecognized. However, the
> USB device error message went away. How? I reconfigured the Generic USB
> Drive in Device Manager for "configured for performance," meaning that
> it must be 'safely removed' before I can free the port. When it
> initially was recognized by Vista, it was as a Plug and Play, and this
> classification seems to have been the only thing prompting the
> exclamation point next to the Generic USB Device in Device Manager. So
> that error's gone.
>
> But it still won't open.
>
> The HDD enclosure came with a disk with drivers. However, Vista doesn't
> recognize any of them in a Device Install, and also the instructions are
> written by Chinese people (yes, I mean literally: the CD's name is
> "我的光碟", which is probably Mandarin for "HA
> YOU'RE A CHUMP").
>
> Instructions on the disk about possible problems:
>
> ::::1. Make sure the USB cable is properly connected to your
> computer.::
> ::2. Make sure the power supply provides enough power.::
>
> ::3. For Windows 98 the driver is installation. ::
> ::*(?WTF?)*
> ::::4. Some hard disk must be set to master mode.::
> ::5. Delete the “USB Mass Storage Device†from the
> “USB Controllerâ€::
> ::
> I'm going to try Number Five now because I have no idea how to do
> Number Four. Of course, I'm going to restart.
>
>
> --
> pauliewalnuts
>
 

My Computer

pauliewalnuts

Chief Flapajaw
Power User
Messages
278
Location
Columbia, MD
#12
Change, add, or remove a drive letter - Windows Vista Help doesn't help at all.

I can't rename a disk drive if the system hasn't initialized the disk, and I can't initialize the disk because, and I quote from Computer Management, "The Device is not ready." This applies to both MBR and GPT styles of partitoning that Vista offers, and both messages pop up immediately.

HOWEVER...

I did what was suggested here and went straight to diskmgmt.msc. Initializing here actually caused the disk light to go green (working) and the computer actually did something. Then, it came up with the 'device not ready' dialogue again.

An MBR initialization immediately brings up a fail.
The GPT initialization actually makes the computer do some kind of work, at least, for a good two minutes before it brings up the fail.

I don't know. I'm giving up. My data can be rebuilt after a couple months (it was only 800 Kb of data) but I will never buy another Microsoft product again. They have literally costed me hundreds of dollars in PENALTIES for using their products, penalties in the forms of 1) lost data, 2) lost hours trying to make solutions, and 3) lost hours trying to get something workable out of Microsoft's lousy product support.

Never again. I don't understand what happened; they used to make a good product.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Hewlett-Packard dv6936us
    CPU
    Intel Core 2 Duo "Merom" T5750, 2 GHz, stock clocking
    Motherboard
    stock Quanta 30D2, v.792E
    Memory
    4 GHz, 667 MHz bus speed
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS, stock
    Sound Card
    stock Realtek software-based
    Monitor(s) Displays
    stock 15.4" widescreen
    Screen Resolution
    stock 1280 X 800
    Hard Drives
    stock Toshiba MK2546GSX and a Western Digital 1TB MyBook
    PSU
    stock
    Case
    stock
    Cooling
    stock plus Rocketfish model RF-LAPCOL
    Mouse
    stock Synaptics Pointing Device
    Keyboard
    stock
    Internet Speed
    Ludicrous Speed (~10.9 Mbps, more or less)
    Other Info
    Browser: Namoroka v1.9.2.3666 64-bit build. Computer specs:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01485288&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3747246
    I like chocolate milk!
R

Richard Urban

#13
You can restore your data from the backups you created!

--

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience


"pauliewalnuts" <guest@xxxxxx-email.com> wrote in message
news:950fee5b075f86aae95cade58d0a2140@xxxxxx-gateway.com...

>
> 'Change, add, or remove a drive letter - Windows Vista Help'
> (http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/Help/ada5519d-850d-465d-a6a7-598fa2f110521033.mspx)
> doesn't help at all.
>
> I can't rename a disk drive if the system hasn't initialized the disk,
> and I can't initialize the disk because, and I quote from Computer
> Management, "The Device is not ready." This applies to both MBR and GPT
> styles of partitoning that Vista offers.
>
> I'm giving up. My data can be rebuilt after a couple months but I will
> never buy another Microsoft product again. They have literally costed me
> hundreds of dollars in PENALTIES for using their products, penalties in
> the forms of 1) lost data, 2) lost hours trying to make solutions, and
> 3) lost hours trying to get something workable out of Microsoft's lousy
> product support.
>
> Never again. I don't understand what happened; they used to make a good
> product.
>
>
> --
> pauliewalnuts
 

My Computer

pauliewalnuts

Chief Flapajaw
Power User
Messages
278
Location
Columbia, MD
#14
Nope. The drive was the primary hard drive from an XP Service Pack 2 laptop. The reason I'm not using the laptop, a Dell Inspiron 1100, to copy the file to my new computer is that it's graphic chip went kaput, so I can't see what I'm doing.

I don't know; the whole situation is silly. I'm just a dumb guy.
 

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Hewlett-Packard dv6936us
    CPU
    Intel Core 2 Duo "Merom" T5750, 2 GHz, stock clocking
    Motherboard
    stock Quanta 30D2, v.792E
    Memory
    4 GHz, 667 MHz bus speed
    Graphics Card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce 8400M GS, stock
    Sound Card
    stock Realtek software-based
    Monitor(s) Displays
    stock 15.4" widescreen
    Screen Resolution
    stock 1280 X 800
    Hard Drives
    stock Toshiba MK2546GSX and a Western Digital 1TB MyBook
    PSU
    stock
    Case
    stock
    Cooling
    stock plus Rocketfish model RF-LAPCOL
    Mouse
    stock Synaptics Pointing Device
    Keyboard
    stock
    Internet Speed
    Ludicrous Speed (~10.9 Mbps, more or less)
    Other Info
    Browser: Namoroka v1.9.2.3666 64-bit build. Computer specs:
    http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01485288&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3747246
    I like chocolate milk!

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