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For Sale: Vista Home

F
#1
I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I need
that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My Home edition
is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or will the software
see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?

Thanks,
tangot2@mail.com
 

My Computer

M

Mike Brannigan

#2
"Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My Home
>edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or will the
>software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>
> Thanks,
> tangot2@mail.com


You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell the hard
drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as long as you
provide everything that came with the product (including Original DVD and
Product Activation Key on its original sticker or card.).
The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and activated and
that they will need to activate by telephone and explain to the rep that
this was on another PC but has now been moved to theirs.

--

Mike Brannigan
 

My Computer

#3
Goto control panel, Upgrade anytime and upgrade to Ultimate.


"Mike Brannigan" <Mike.Brannigan@localhost> wrote in message
news:64469517-45B9-4BAE-85D7-F3B68E81A3DD@microsoft.com...
> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>>failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>>need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My Home
>>edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or will the
>>software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> tangot2@mail.com

>
> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell the
> hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as long as
> you provide everything that came with the product (including Original DVD
> and Product Activation Key on its original sticker or card.).
> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and activated and
> that they will need to activate by telephone and explain to the rep that
> this was on another PC but has now been moved to theirs.
>
> --
>
> Mike Brannigan
 

My Computer

R

Roy Coorne

#4
Fred wrote:
> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
> failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
> need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
> Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
> will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?


Yes, the software will see it is on another mainboard... and there is
no repair installation as it is with Windows XP.


Roy
 

My Computer

B
#5
I think you will find that if you sold the HDD with Vista installed that when
the HDD is installed into another computer you will get the "blue screen of
death" and have to do a complete clean install again.

I did this as a test for both XP Pro and Vista and the result is the same.
If your not happy with your copy of Vista you can sell it, but you MUST
inform the purchaser that it has been installed once on your machine.
Or as suggested earlier just download the upgrade to a higher version of
Vista.

"Roy Coorne" wrote:

> Fred wrote:
> > I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
> > failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
> > need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
> > Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
> > will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?

>
> Yes, the software will see it is on another mainboard... and there is
> no repair installation as it is with Windows XP.
>
>
> Roy
>
 

My Computer

B

Big Dummy

#6
"Roy Coorne" <rcoorne@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:eTwgJXBjHHA.2552@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
> Fred wrote:
>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>> failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>> need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My Home
>> edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or will
>> the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?

>
> Yes, the software will see it is on another mainboard... and there is no
> repair installation as it is with Windows XP.
>
>
> Roy



Roy, I notice you say 'motherboard'.

It's my understanding that Vista takes a fingerprint of some of your
hardware, and possibly the motherboard could be one of those items as I've
swapped out motherboards in the past and had to get another key.

Therefore, it's not only the motherboard, but other hardware in the PC. All
he really needs to do is let Microsoft know he purchased the software with
the key on a new hard disk. They will most likely give him a new key so he
can activate it. HOWEVER, due to the 'hardware' fingerprint, there may be
other items that were noted during the first activation.

This is how I would handle it to be entirely safe. I would repartition the
hard drive and reformat to my specifications. Then I would install the
software using the original product key. Most likely it will not bomb out
since it would only be the second activation. Then notify Microsoft that
I'm the new owner of the license and give them necessary info and reactivate
the software. No muss, no fuss, and it's all clean and legal.

When people sell their PC's they don't take into account the software
installed on that PC. They don't know that all licenses for the software on
the system needs to be transferred or software destroyed in accordance with
the publisher's requirements. So, when someone sells their old XP box, they
also need to transfer the license to XP and the new owner needs to let
Microsoft know about it. I know I've beaten Adobe over the head several
times concerning their products.
 

My Computer

B

Big Dummy

#7
Re: For Sale: Vista Home - The Best Way To Do It and Stay legal

"Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My Home
>edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or will the
>software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>
> Thanks,
> tangot2@mail.com



Here's what you should do. If you want to sell the hard disk as well,
that's your prerogative but it may cause problems with the new owner since
it took a fingerprint of more than your hard disk.

Just remove Vista from the hard disk and sell the software to the new owner.
Have the new owner notify Microsoft that they are the new owner and
Microsoft will probably give them a new product key to use. Then your
activation is deactivated and theirs is activated. When they install on
their system, a fingerprint is taken of THEIR system instead of yours.

It may sound a bit much, but it's really not that hard and it's one way to
do it and keep your hard disk and sell the software legally.
 

My Computer

B

Big Dummy

#8
"Bob" <Bob@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:9C8F0ABF-680F-4540-A6C1-E456ADB1AE0E@microsoft.com...
>I think you will find that if you sold the HDD with Vista installed that
>when
> the HDD is installed into another computer you will get the "blue screen
> of
> death" and have to do a complete clean install again.
>
> I did this as a test for both XP Pro and Vista and the result is the same.
> If your not happy with your copy of Vista you can sell it, but you MUST
> inform the purchaser that it has been installed once on your machine.
> Or as suggested earlier just download the upgrade to a higher version of
> Vista.
>
> "Roy Coorne" wrote:
>
>> Fred wrote:
>> > I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>> > failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>> > need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
>> > Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
>> > will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?

>>
>> Yes, the software will see it is on another mainboard... and there is
>> no repair installation as it is with Windows XP.
>>
>>
>> Roy
>>



Damn Bob, I didn't think of that. The motherboard drivers were probably
also installed on the first system or MS generic drivers installed for the
hardware that the new machine may not have. I know whenever I reinstall an
OS, I also have to use the CD that came with my motherboard to install the
motherboard drivers and other drivers from their respective disk. Good
point.
 

My Computer

N

Nina DiBoy

#9
Mike Brannigan wrote:
> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>> failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium.
>> I need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
>> Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
>> will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> tangot2@mail.com

>
> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell the
> hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as long as
> you provide everything that came with the product (including Original
> DVD and Product Activation Key on its original sticker or card.).
> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and activated
> and that they will need to activate by telephone and explain to the rep
> that this was on another PC but has now been moved to theirs.
>


Actually, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this
information. When you call to activate, NO other information is
required except as documented below on the MS site:

http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_facts.mspx

Mandatory Product Activation Data
The Installation ID is unique to each product and comprises two components:

Product ID. Unique to the product key used during installation

Hardware hash. Non-unique representation of the PC

The country in which the product is being installed (for Office XP and
Office XP family products only)

Protect your privacy. You do not need to give them more information
than that, even if they ask. Simply point them to this link where they
have it documented. If they persist anyway, ask to speak to a
supervisor. Anything more than the above information which they require
is none of their business.

--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"It would be nice if there was a check to see if you were running an
activated/validated version of Windows before you were allowed to post
in any of these news groups. If you're not activated/validated your post
automatically gets deleted.
That would get rid of the Linsux Luzzzzzzzzers once and for all."

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 

My Computer

N

Nina DiBoy

#10
Re: For Sale: Vista Home - The Best Way To Do It and Stay legal

Big Dummy wrote:
> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>> failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium.
>> I need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
>> Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
>> will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> tangot2@mail.com

>
>
> Here's what you should do. If you want to sell the hard disk as well,
> that's your prerogative but it may cause problems with the new owner
> since it took a fingerprint of more than your hard disk.
>
> Just remove Vista from the hard disk and sell the software to the new
> owner. Have the new owner notify Microsoft that they are the new owner
> and Microsoft will probably give them a new product key to use. Then
> your activation is deactivated and theirs is activated. When they
> install on their system, a fingerprint is taken of THEIR system instead
> of yours.
>
> It may sound a bit much, but it's really not that hard and it's one way
> to do it and keep your hard disk and sell the software legally.
>


Again, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this information.
When you call to activate, NO other information is required except as
documented below on the MS site:

http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_facts.mspx

Mandatory Product Activation Data
The Installation ID is unique to each product and comprises two components:

Product ID. Unique to the product key used during installation

Hardware hash. Non-unique representation of the PC

The country in which the product is being installed (for Office XP and
Office XP family products only)

Protect your privacy. You do not need to give them more information
than that, even if they ask. Simply point them to this link where they
have it documented. If they persist anyway, ask to speak to a
supervisor. Anything more than the above information which they require
is none of their business.


--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"It would be nice if there was a check to see if you were running an
activated/validated version of Windows before you were allowed to post
in any of these news groups. If you're not activated/validated your post
automatically gets deleted.
That would get rid of the Linsux Luzzzzzzzzers once and for all."

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 

My Computer

#11
What if he got OEM or DSP?

Only RETAIL can be resold.. OEM and DSP is tied to the system he first
installed and cannot be tranfered. Furthermore he cannot just sell the drive
and expect the other guy to install it and boot into vista... he will have
to re install on his own system.

Win95 and 98 COULD do that though most of the times with no problem...

with win2000 and XP you would most possibly get a blue screen.. but in some
cases it worked.


"Mike Brannigan" <Mike.Brannigan@localhost> wrote in message
news:64469517-45B9-4BAE-85D7-F3B68E81A3DD@microsoft.com...
> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>>failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>>need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My Home
>>edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or will the
>>software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> tangot2@mail.com

>
> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell the
> hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as long as
> you provide everything that came with the product (including Original DVD
> and Product Activation Key on its original sticker or card.).
> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and activated and
> that they will need to activate by telephone and explain to the rep that
> this was on another PC but has now been moved to theirs.
>
> --
>
> Mike Brannigan
 

My Computer

X

xfile

#12
> I did this as a test for both XP Pro and Vista and the result is the same.

Thanks for sharing, and have you tested the scenario for using backup image
of the original install and restore after hardware upgrade/changes? If so,
can it work and does it also require a "clean" install.

Someone mentioned that it is possible to avoid additional activations due to
hardware failures if original install (before activation) has been back up
and then use to restore after hardware changes.

Thanks.




"Bob" <Bob@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:9C8F0ABF-680F-4540-A6C1-E456ADB1AE0E@microsoft.com...
>I think you will find that if you sold the HDD with Vista installed that
>when
> the HDD is installed into another computer you will get the "blue screen
> of
> death" and have to do a complete clean install again.
>
> I did this as a test for both XP Pro and Vista and the result is the same.
> If your not happy with your copy of Vista you can sell it, but you MUST
> inform the purchaser that it has been installed once on your machine.
> Or as suggested earlier just download the upgrade to a higher version of
> Vista.
>
> "Roy Coorne" wrote:
>
>> Fred wrote:
>> > I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>> > failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>> > need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
>> > Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
>> > will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?

>>
>> Yes, the software will see it is on another mainboard... and there is
>> no repair installation as it is with Windows XP.
>>
>>
>> Roy
>>
 

My Computer

#13
Re: For Sale: Vista Home - The Best Way To Do It and Stay legal

In reference to my earlier comment; Windows XP & Vista do take a snapshot of
the Motherboard. You are able to change the CPU without having to redo
Windows but not the MoBo.

"Big Dummy" wrote:

> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
> >I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
> >failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
> >need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My Home
> >edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or will the
> >software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > tangot2@mail.com

>
>
> Here's what you should do. If you want to sell the hard disk as well,
> that's your prerogative but it may cause problems with the new owner since
> it took a fingerprint of more than your hard disk.
>
> Just remove Vista from the hard disk and sell the software to the new owner.
> Have the new owner notify Microsoft that they are the new owner and
> Microsoft will probably give them a new product key to use. Then your
> activation is deactivated and theirs is activated. When they install on
> their system, a fingerprint is taken of THEIR system instead of yours.
>
> It may sound a bit much, but it's really not that hard and it's one way to
> do it and keep your hard disk and sell the software legally.
>
 

My Computer

M

Mike Brannigan

#14
"Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f18o2u$hck$1@aioe.org...
> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
>> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>>> failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>>> need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
>>> Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
>>> will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> tangot2@mail.com

>>
>> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell the
>> hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as long as
>> you provide everything that came with the product (including Original DVD
>> and Product Activation Key on its original sticker or card.).
>> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and activated
>> and that they will need to activate by telephone and explain to the rep
>> that this was on another PC but has now been moved to theirs.
>>

>
> Actually, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this information.
> When you call to activate, NO other information is required except as
> documented below on the MS site:
>


They will ask you if this software is installed elsewhere, it is part of
the script.
--

Mike Brannigan
"Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f18o2u$hck$1@aioe.org...
> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
>> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>>> failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium. I
>>> need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
>>> Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
>>> will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> tangot2@mail.com

>>
>> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell the
>> hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as long as
>> you provide everything that came with the product (including Original DVD
>> and Product Activation Key on its original sticker or card.).
>> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and activated
>> and that they will need to activate by telephone and explain to the rep
>> that this was on another PC but has now been moved to theirs.
>>

>
> Actually, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this information.
> When you call to activate, NO other information is required except as
> documented below on the MS site:
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_facts.mspx
>
> Mandatory Product Activation Data
> The Installation ID is unique to each product and comprises two
> components:
>
> Product ID. Unique to the product key used during installation
>
> Hardware hash. Non-unique representation of the PC
>
> The country in which the product is being installed (for Office XP and
> Office XP family products only)
>
> Protect your privacy. You do not need to give them more information than
> that, even if they ask. Simply point them to this link where they have it
> documented. If they persist anyway, ask to speak to a supervisor.
> Anything more than the above information which they require is none of
> their business.
>
> --
> Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
> http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html
>
> Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
> "It would be nice if there was a check to see if you were running an
> activated/validated version of Windows before you were allowed to post in
> any of these news groups. If you're not activated/validated your post
> automatically gets deleted.
> That would get rid of the Linsux Luzzzzzzzzers once and for all."
>
> "Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
> - T. S. Eliot
 

My Computer

N

Nina DiBoy

#15
Mike Brannigan wrote:
> "Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f18o2u$hck$1@aioe.org...
>> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>>> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
>>> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What
>>>> I failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home
>>>> Premium. I need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate
>>>> editions. My Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and
>>>> all and be OK or will the software see it is on a different
>>>> motherboard and squawk?
>>>>
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> tangot2@mail.com
>>>
>>> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell
>>> the hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as
>>> long as you provide everything that came with the product (including
>>> Original DVD and Product Activation Key on its original sticker or
>>> card.).
>>> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and
>>> activated and that they will need to activate by telephone and
>>> explain to the rep that this was on another PC but has now been moved
>>> to theirs.
>>>

>>
>> Actually, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this
>> information. When you call to activate, NO other information is
>> required except as documented below on the MS site:
>>


http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_facts.mspx

Mandatory Product Activation Data

* The Installation ID is unique to each product and comprises two
components:

1. Product ID. Unique to the product key used during installation
2. Hardware hash. Non-unique representation of the PC

* The country in which the product is being installed (for Office
XP and Office XP family products only)

>
> They will ask you if this software is installed elsewhere, it is part
> of the script.


I understand that, but Microsoft does not require the customer phoning
in to answer those questions as per documented on their website. Which
means you don't have to answer if you don't want.

--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"It would be nice if there was a check to see if you were running an
activated/validated version of Windows before you were allowed to post
in any
of these news groups. If you're not activated/validated your post
automatically gets deleted.
That would get rid of the Linsux Luzzzzzzzzers once and for all."

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 

My Computer

B

Big Dummy

#16
"Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f1ajjk$kpd$1@aioe.org...
> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>> "Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f18o2u$hck$1@aioe.org...
>>> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>>>> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>>>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive. What I
>>>>> failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home Premium.
>>>>> I need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate editions. My
>>>>> Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive and all and be OK or
>>>>> will the software see it is on a different motherboard and squawk?
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>> tangot2@mail.com
>>>>
>>>> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell the
>>>> hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as long as
>>>> you provide everything that came with the product (including Original
>>>> DVD and Product Activation Key on its original sticker or card.).
>>>> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and activated
>>>> and that they will need to activate by telephone and explain to the rep
>>>> that this was on another PC but has now been moved to theirs.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Actually, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this
>>> information. When you call to activate, NO other information is required
>>> except as documented below on the MS site:
>>>

>
> http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_facts.mspx
>
> Mandatory Product Activation Data
>
> * The Installation ID is unique to each product and comprises two
> components:
>
> 1. Product ID. Unique to the product key used during installation
> 2. Hardware hash. Non-unique representation of the PC
>
> * The country in which the product is being installed (for Office XP
> and Office XP family products only)
>
>>
>> They will ask you if this software is installed elsewhere, it is part of
>> the script.

>
> I understand that, but Microsoft does not require the customer phoning in
> to answer those questions as per documented on their website. Which means
> you don't have to answer if you don't want.
>
> --
> Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
> http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html
>
> Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
> "It would be nice if there was a check to see if you were running an
> activated/validated version of Windows before you were allowed to post in
> any
> of these news groups. If you're not activated/validated your post
> automatically gets deleted.
> That would get rid of the Linsux Luzzzzzzzzers once and for all."
>
> "Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
> - T. S. Eliot



Thanks. I was talking from the hip on that, but the bottom line is the two
system and one Vista problem and basically that's all they want or need to
know. Just to keep you honest. Wish they would let you install on a
notebook as well or at least cut the price %50 for a special license to do
that.
 

My Computer

N

Nina DiBoy

#17
Big Dummy wrote:
> "Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f1ajjk$kpd$1@aioe.org...
>> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>>> "Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f18o2u$hck$1@aioe.org...
>>>> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>>>>> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>>>>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive.
>>>>>> What I failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home
>>>>>> Premium. I need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate
>>>>>> editions. My Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive
>>>>>> and all and be OK or will the software see it is on a different
>>>>>> motherboard and squawk?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>>> tangot2@mail.com
>>>>>
>>>>> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell
>>>>> the hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as
>>>>> long as you provide everything that came with the product
>>>>> (including Original DVD and Product Activation Key on its original
>>>>> sticker or card.).
>>>>> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and
>>>>> activated and that they will need to activate by telephone and
>>>>> explain to the rep that this was on another PC but has now been
>>>>> moved to theirs.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Actually, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this
>>>> information. When you call to activate, NO other information is
>>>> required except as documented below on the MS site:
>>>>

>>
>> http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_facts.mspx
>>
>> Mandatory Product Activation Data
>>
>> * The Installation ID is unique to each product and comprises two
>> components:
>>
>> 1. Product ID. Unique to the product key used during installation
>> 2. Hardware hash. Non-unique representation of the PC
>>
>> * The country in which the product is being installed (for Office
>> XP and Office XP family products only)
>>
>>>
>>> They will ask you if this software is installed elsewhere, it is
>>> part of the script.

>>
>> I understand that, but Microsoft does not require the customer phoning
>> in to answer those questions as per documented on their website.
>> Which means you don't have to answer if you don't want.

>
> Thanks. I was talking from the hip on that, but the bottom line is the
> two system and one Vista problem and basically that's all they want or
> need to know. Just to keep you honest. Wish they would let you install
> on a notebook as well or at least cut the price %50 for a special
> license to do that.
>


Agreed. MS just keeps getting greedier over the years.

--
Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
"It would be nice if there was a check to see if you were running an
activated/validated version of Windows before you were allowed to post
in any of these news groups. If you're not activated/validated your post
automatically gets deleted.
That would get rid of the Linsux Luzzzzzzzzers once and for all."

"Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
- T. S. Eliot
 

My Computer

M

MICHAEL

#18
* Nina DiBoy:
> Big Dummy wrote:
>> "Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f1ajjk$kpd$1@aioe.org...
>>> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>>>> "Nina DiBoy" <nin@di.boy> wrote in message news:f18o2u$hck$1@aioe.org...
>>>>> Mike Brannigan wrote:
>>>>>> "Fred" <tangot2@mail.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:4CEFF0B1-E186-4CD3-B2BD-406DB0FD3892@microsoft.com...
>>>>>>> I bought Vista Home Premium and loaded it on a new hard drive.
>>>>>>> What I failed to notice is Remote Desktop is not a feature of Home
>>>>>>> Premium. I need that feature which comes on Business and Ultimate
>>>>>>> editions. My Home edition is activated. Can I sell hard drive
>>>>>>> and all and be OK or will the software see it is on a different
>>>>>>> motherboard and squawk?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thanks,
>>>>>>> tangot2@mail.com
>>>>>> You can sell the hard drive - but if you actually mean can you sell
>>>>>> the hard drive AND the Windows Vista software - then yes you can as
>>>>>> long as you provide everything that came with the product
>>>>>> (including Original DVD and Product Activation Key on its original
>>>>>> sticker or card.).
>>>>>> The purchaser must also be aware that this has been used and
>>>>>> activated and that they will need to activate by telephone and
>>>>>> explain to the rep that this was on another PC but has now been
>>>>>> moved to theirs.
>>>>>>
>>>>> Actually, they don't need to give the phone rep most of this
>>>>> information. When you call to activate, NO other information is
>>>>> required except as documented below on the MS site:
>>>>>
>>> http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_facts.mspx
>>>
>>> Mandatory Product Activation Data
>>>
>>> * The Installation ID is unique to each product and comprises two
>>> components:
>>>
>>> 1. Product ID. Unique to the product key used during installation
>>> 2. Hardware hash. Non-unique representation of the PC
>>>
>>> * The country in which the product is being installed (for Office
>>> XP and Office XP family products only)
>>>
>>>> They will ask you if this software is installed elsewhere, it is
>>>> part of the script.
>>> I understand that, but Microsoft does not require the customer phoning
>>> in to answer those questions as per documented on their website.
>>> Which means you don't have to answer if you don't want.

>> Thanks. I was talking from the hip on that, but the bottom line is the
>> two system and one Vista problem and basically that's all they want or
>> need to know. Just to keep you honest. Wish they would let you install
>> on a notebook as well or at least cut the price %50 for a special
>> license to do that.
>>

>
> Agreed. MS just keeps getting greedier over the years.


It certainly looks that way. If you look at technology over the years,
almost everything has gotten more powerful, with more features, and
and yet, the prices have fallen. Except for Windows.
It might take a little time for the newest things to come down in price,
but they do. Especially, in the computer industry. Except for Windows.

Technological advances , mass production, and competition have
created these market conditions. However, since Microsoft is really
a monopoly, they don't have to abide by these market forces that
have driven the prices of consumer goods down. It is why they have
such huge profit margins, spectacular profit margins. Their last quarterly
report was more than impressive. Basically, it took them $3 in sales to
make $1 in profit. If, you were to count only the Client (OS) and Office
divisions, then it takes about $1 to make .80 cents... that's incredible.
There is a part of me that admires such a money machine. But, there
does come a point when a company really starts to look like a bunch
of greedy pigs. IMO, Microsoft reached that point a long time ago.
Or, they can see the light and know their days are numbered, and
are making sure they can grab as much now as they can, before
their bottom falls out.

Of course, if you owned stock in Microsoft such numbers would make
you giddy. Except, Microsoft's stock has been stuck for years. There are
a few bumps right after the quarterly releases, the launch of something new,
or when Microsoft takes some of their ridiculous amount of stashed cash
and starts propping up the stock price by buying back their own stock.
A small bump up when Microsoft issued their *first ever* dividend in *2003*.
But, the stock then settles down to that range it has been stuck in for
about 8 years. I wonder why that is? Perhaps, the stock was overbought in
the mid to late 90s. Maybe, there are a lot of investors who just don't see
Microsoft being able to continue doing business as they do, getting away
with it, maintaining their monopoly, and generating such huge profits.
Monopolies don't last forever. Competition, market forces will come to bare
sooner or later, and when they do, Microsoft better watch out......
the shareholders, too.


-Michael
 

My Computer

H

HEMI-Powered

#19
Today, MICHAEL made these interesting comments ...

>> Agreed. MS just keeps getting greedier over the years.

>
> It certainly looks that way. If you look at technology over
> the years, almost everything has gotten more powerful, with
> more features, and and yet, the prices have fallen. Except
> for Windows. It might take a little time for the newest things
> to come down in price, but they do. Especially, in the
> computer industry. Except for Windows.


Perhaps Economics 101 plays a big part here - supply and demand,
and old-fashioned competition. When there is true competition, as
in the hardware market for PCs, peripherals, the general
electronics industry, cars, washing machines, just about anything
manufactured, technological advances typically drive prices down
as manufacturers attempt to gain market share by using better
technology to improve their bottom line. And, when there is true
competition, manufacturers of both goods and services can afford
to take a smaller profit margin as a percent of revenue in the
hopes of increased sales, driving even higher revenues, in turn
increasing profits.

But, absent competition as in a monopoly or ologopoly, there is
no incentive to lower prices. With a bit of over simplification,
for the average personal computer buyer, there is Windows, Mac,
and Linux, that's about all. The PC vs. Mac debate has been going
on for a long time, with Mac prices stubbornly staying quite high
but the relative market shares are also pretty static.

Microsoft cuts the OEMs pretty good deals to attempt to keep
Linus off their boxes but for us retain folk, why should they
reduce prices? There is always a feeding frenzy to be the first
on your block to beta test any new version of any software with
one's Visa card, but ultimately, if you need or want a new PC and
aren't building your own, eventually you will be driven into MS's
playing field, again, no incentive to reduce prices.

Economists would call operating systems an inelastic commodity,
meaning that no matter the price, people will buy it because they
either feel they must have it or because there is no other game
in town. Really bad example: cigarettes. Example of an elastic
commodity, gasoline: when prices spike, as they have several
times in the last 18 months, people start to get religion and
think in terms of smaller cars or hybrids. But, as soon as prices
ease, they go right back to their big SUVs and high-performance
cars.

One other comment: budgets are a zero-sum game for
people/families, companies or governments, meaning there is only
so much money and compromises must be made. In order to spend
more on something you need or want, you must spend less on
something else. So, wrt operating systems, it would seem that for
the last couple of decades, people have voted with their wallets
- sales of Windows and Macs keep going up regardless of the price
and seemingly irregardless of the percent the O/S is of the
overall system price.

> Technological advances , mass production, and competition have
> created these market conditions. However, since Microsoft is
> really a monopoly, they don't have to abide by these market
> forces that have driven the prices of consumer goods down. It
> is why they have such huge profit margins, spectacular profit
> margins. Their last quarterly report was more than
> impressive. Basically, it took them $3 in sales to make $1 in
> profit. If, you were to count only the Client (OS) and Office
> divisions, then it takes about $1 to make .80 cents... that's
> incredible. There is a part of me that admires such a money
> machine. But, there does come a point when a company really
> starts to look like a bunch of greedy pigs. IMO, Microsoft
> reached that point a long time ago. Or, they can see the light
> and know their days are numbered, and are making sure they can
> grab as much now as they can, before their bottom falls out.
>
> Of course, if you owned stock in Microsoft such numbers would
> make you giddy. Except, Microsoft's stock has been stuck for
> years. There are a few bumps right after the quarterly
> releases, the launch of something new, or when Microsoft takes
> some of their ridiculous amount of stashed cash and starts
> propping up the stock price by buying back their own stock.
> A small bump up when Microsoft issued their *first ever*
> dividend in *2003*. But, the stock then settles down to that
> range it has been stuck in for about 8 years. I wonder why
> that is? Perhaps, the stock was overbought in the mid to late
> 90s. Maybe, there are a lot of investors who just don't see
> Microsoft being able to continue doing business as they do,
> getting away with it, maintaining their monopoly, and
> generating such huge profits. Monopolies don't last forever.
> Competition, market forces will come to bare sooner or later,
> and when they do, Microsoft better watch out...... the
> shareholders, too.
>

I DID own MS stock thinking I could ride it up to riches as Bill
Gates became even more of a bazillionaire. But, the stock price
dropped in half a few years back and despite larger gains in
sales and revenues, and with compensating large gains in profits
from Steve Balmer's more efficient and effective management
structure, the stock market has decided not to value MS stock any
higher and it stays stubbornly stuck where it was years ago. It
isn't that earnings are low or getting lower; they're not, they
are rising. It isn't that MS is in a cyclical market like cars
where companies frequently tank to the point of red ink; they're
not. Yet, the market refuses to reward stockholders with higher
prices. This probably annoys the living hell out of Bill and his
buddies whose real wealth is in the stock they hold and the
options granted to them over the years, much of which is
underwater. But, being an optimist wrt to Vista's ability to
boost profits at MS, I bought back in at a moderate level. Only
time will tell if I did something smart or really dumb again.

Seems you and I at least partially share some "reasons" that
explain the high price of Windows and why the stock is stagnant.
I guess the only thing to do is stay out of the stock market and
give your O/S dollars to somebody else. Now, who?

--
HP, aka Jerry
 

My Computer

M

MICHAEL

#20
Very well said, Jerry.

I don't really have anything to add, because
there's nothing I find that I disagree with.
Except, I'd be thinking short term on the Microsoft
stock you bought. There's a part of me that really
feels like the "good times" have about peaked for
Microsoft. We'll see.

Of course, with all the money and resources Microsoft
has, they could end up doing/developing something
so extraordinary, it rocks the technology world and sends
their stock zooming up. Do they have the will to do
something extraordinary? Many times, behemoths like
Microsoft are too complacent and too large to do that,
they die slow deaths. Then again, IBM is still a healthy,
profitable company. Although, a very innovative company
that managed to roll with the punches.

Is Microsoft really that innovative and nimble?

Take care,

Michael

* HEMI-Powered:
> Today, MICHAEL made these interesting comments ...
>
>>> Agreed. MS just keeps getting greedier over the years.

>> It certainly looks that way. If you look at technology over
>> the years, almost everything has gotten more powerful, with
>> more features, and and yet, the prices have fallen. Except
>> for Windows. It might take a little time for the newest things
>> to come down in price, but they do. Especially, in the
>> computer industry. Except for Windows.

>
> Perhaps Economics 101 plays a big part here - supply and demand,
> and old-fashioned competition. When there is true competition, as
> in the hardware market for PCs, peripherals, the general
> electronics industry, cars, washing machines, just about anything
> manufactured, technological advances typically drive prices down
> as manufacturers attempt to gain market share by using better
> technology to improve their bottom line. And, when there is true
> competition, manufacturers of both goods and services can afford
> to take a smaller profit margin as a percent of revenue in the
> hopes of increased sales, driving even higher revenues, in turn
> increasing profits.
>
> But, absent competition as in a monopoly or ologopoly, there is
> no incentive to lower prices. With a bit of over simplification,
> for the average personal computer buyer, there is Windows, Mac,
> and Linux, that's about all. The PC vs. Mac debate has been going
> on for a long time, with Mac prices stubbornly staying quite high
> but the relative market shares are also pretty static.
>
> Microsoft cuts the OEMs pretty good deals to attempt to keep
> Linus off their boxes but for us retain folk, why should they
> reduce prices? There is always a feeding frenzy to be the first
> on your block to beta test any new version of any software with
> one's Visa card, but ultimately, if you need or want a new PC and
> aren't building your own, eventually you will be driven into MS's
> playing field, again, no incentive to reduce prices.
>
> Economists would call operating systems an inelastic commodity,
> meaning that no matter the price, people will buy it because they
> either feel they must have it or because there is no other game
> in town. Really bad example: cigarettes. Example of an elastic
> commodity, gasoline: when prices spike, as they have several
> times in the last 18 months, people start to get religion and
> think in terms of smaller cars or hybrids. But, as soon as prices
> ease, they go right back to their big SUVs and high-performance
> cars.
>
> One other comment: budgets are a zero-sum game for
> people/families, companies or governments, meaning there is only
> so much money and compromises must be made. In order to spend
> more on something you need or want, you must spend less on
> something else. So, wrt operating systems, it would seem that for
> the last couple of decades, people have voted with their wallets
> - sales of Windows and Macs keep going up regardless of the price
> and seemingly irregardless of the percent the O/S is of the
> overall system price.
>
>> Technological advances , mass production, and competition have
>> created these market conditions. However, since Microsoft is
>> really a monopoly, they don't have to abide by these market
>> forces that have driven the prices of consumer goods down. It
>> is why they have such huge profit margins, spectacular profit
>> margins. Their last quarterly report was more than
>> impressive. Basically, it took them $3 in sales to make $1 in
>> profit. If, you were to count only the Client (OS) and Office
>> divisions, then it takes about $1 to make .80 cents... that's
>> incredible. There is a part of me that admires such a money
>> machine. But, there does come a point when a company really
>> starts to look like a bunch of greedy pigs. IMO, Microsoft
>> reached that point a long time ago. Or, they can see the light
>> and know their days are numbered, and are making sure they can
>> grab as much now as they can, before their bottom falls out.
>>
>> Of course, if you owned stock in Microsoft such numbers would
>> make you giddy. Except, Microsoft's stock has been stuck for
>> years. There are a few bumps right after the quarterly
>> releases, the launch of something new, or when Microsoft takes
>> some of their ridiculous amount of stashed cash and starts
>> propping up the stock price by buying back their own stock.
>> A small bump up when Microsoft issued their *first ever*
>> dividend in *2003*. But, the stock then settles down to that
>> range it has been stuck in for about 8 years. I wonder why
>> that is? Perhaps, the stock was overbought in the mid to late
>> 90s. Maybe, there are a lot of investors who just don't see
>> Microsoft being able to continue doing business as they do,
>> getting away with it, maintaining their monopoly, and
>> generating such huge profits. Monopolies don't last forever.
>> Competition, market forces will come to bare sooner or later,
>> and when they do, Microsoft better watch out...... the
>> shareholders, too.
>>

> I DID own MS stock thinking I could ride it up to riches as Bill
> Gates became even more of a bazillionaire. But, the stock price
> dropped in half a few years back and despite larger gains in
> sales and revenues, and with compensating large gains in profits
> from Steve Balmer's more efficient and effective management
> structure, the stock market has decided not to value MS stock any
> higher and it stays stubbornly stuck where it was years ago. It
> isn't that earnings are low or getting lower; they're not, they
> are rising. It isn't that MS is in a cyclical market like cars
> where companies frequently tank to the point of red ink; they're
> not. Yet, the market refuses to reward stockholders with higher
> prices. This probably annoys the living hell out of Bill and his
> buddies whose real wealth is in the stock they hold and the
> options granted to them over the years, much of which is
> underwater. But, being an optimist wrt to Vista's ability to
> boost profits at MS, I bought back in at a moderate level. Only
> time will tell if I did something smart or really dumb again.
>
> Seems you and I at least partially share some "reasons" that
> explain the high price of Windows and why the stock is stagnant.
> I guess the only thing to do is stay out of the stock market and
> give your O/S dollars to somebody else. Now, who?
>
 

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