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UAC popup

S

Sam Holbrook

#1
I have Windows Vista Home Premium as my OS.
I have a program that I use daily.
To get it to work correctly I had to check 'run as administrator'.
How do I now get the program to be a 'known' and 'trusted' program?

TIA.

Regards,
Sam Holbrook
 
M

mb group

#3
Rick Rogers wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Contact the program distributor for a Vista-compatible version. This
> happens because the program is not following the guidelines established
> for running within the user environment instead of the system
> environment. It's trying to write to a protected system folder during
> operation and this is not allowed in a Vista system.
>
I have found just as many viruses and malware on vista as on XP systems...

the method is simple, they put them inside files you think are legit
and you click ok on UAC... and presto.

But now MS has a way to blame it on the user... right?

In fact Vista+malware is far slower than XP+Malware. Why? Well vista has
to drag its big fat ass along with all the malware.. lol

You say but why put malware into the equation?

ANSWER: Greetings alien from a distant galaxy. Here on earth 99% of
WINDOWS computers are infected by malware. So you have to put it into
the equation!

Sony was correct in calling windows an "outdated dinosaur" when
Microsoft proposed to put it as the OS for the sony playstation!
 
R

Richard Urban

#4
What you have found flies in the face of the reality that others have found.

--

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP
Windows Desktop Experience


"mb group" <mbgroup@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:499faecd$2@xxxxxx-privat.org...

> Rick Rogers wrote:

>> Hi,
>>
>> Contact the program distributor for a Vista-compatible version. This
>> happens because the program is not following the guidelines established
>> for running within the user environment instead of the system
>> environment. It's trying to write to a protected system folder during
>> operation and this is not allowed in a Vista system.
>>
>
> I have found just as many viruses and malware on vista as on XP systems...
>
> the method is simple, they put them inside files you think are legit
> and you click ok on UAC... and presto.
>
> But now MS has a way to blame it on the user... right?
>
> In fact Vista+malware is far slower than XP+Malware. Why? Well vista has
> to drag its big fat ass along with all the malware.. lol
>
> You say but why put malware into the equation?
>
> ANSWER: Greetings alien from a distant galaxy. Here on earth 99% of
> WINDOWS computers are infected by malware. So you have to put it into the
> equation!
>
> Sony was correct in calling windows an "outdated dinosaur" when Microsoft
> proposed to put it as the OS for the sony playstation!
>
>
>
 
N

Not Even Me

#5
I haven't found that Vista gets any more or less than XP, but Vista runs
like it has malware even when it doesn't.
The more I use Vista, the more I think it IS Malware...

"mb group" <mbgroup@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:499faecd$2@xxxxxx-privat.org...

> Rick Rogers wrote:

>> Hi,
>>
>> Contact the program distributor for a Vista-compatible version. This
>> happens because the program is not following the guidelines established
>> for running within the user environment instead of the system
>> environment. It's trying to write to a protected system folder during
>> operation and this is not allowed in a Vista system.
>>
>
> I have found just as many viruses and malware on vista as on XP systems...
>
> the method is simple, they put them inside files you think are legit
> and you click ok on UAC... and presto.
>
> But now MS has a way to blame it on the user... right?
>
> In fact Vista+malware is far slower than XP+Malware. Why? Well vista has
> to drag its big fat ass along with all the malware.. lol
>
> You say but why put malware into the equation?
>
> ANSWER: Greetings alien from a distant galaxy. Here on earth 99% of
> WINDOWS computers are infected by malware. So you have to put it into the
> equation!
>
> Sony was correct in calling windows an "outdated dinosaur" when Microsoft
> proposed to put it as the OS for the sony playstation!
>
>
>
 
B

+Bob+

#6
On Sat, 21 Feb 2009 07:43:29 -0500, "Rick Rogers" <rick@xxxxxx>
wrote:

> UAC isn't a perfect
>solution by any means, it's not meant to be. It's really there to get
>software makers to get out of the habit of writing to protected system
>folders. By keeping to the user environment, damage is limited to the
>account, not the entire system.
UAC might be a useable solution if MS had made the other necessary
changes. Instead, they simply declared the whole directory structure
EXCEPT for specific USER folders off limits. They made no attempt to
correct the horribly deficient system structure they've allowed to
develop (one example: letting applications install files in SYSTEM
folders). In addition, they made no provision for accommodate programs
such as the one this user is having trouble with.

I'll let all the side effects of UAC ride for now. MS's strategy
isn't that bad, but their tactics are terrible.

>Sorry, but I'll disagree with you there. Vista on hardware made for it is
>far smoother than XP was on the hardware available at its release time. XP
>on today's hardware is faster than Vista due to less overhead, but lets
>compare apples to apples, not oranges. If you want to use your analogy, then
>we'd all be going at near the speed of light by loading Win98 on a modern
>machine.
See xfile's post first. That noted, your point is well taken, but from
the opposite direction. Why can't they give us Win2K's level of
performance with Vista? It's not like there are any major feature
improvements and in many ways it's a downgrade. The only things that
come to mind are the ability to handle CD/DVD's without added software
and VPN. Vista is a bloated pig.
 
J

Jack the Ripper

#7
Sam Holbrook wrote:

> I have Windows Vista Home Premium as my OS.
> I have a program that I use daily.
> To get it to work correctly I had to check 'run as administrator'.
> How do I now get the program to be a 'known' and 'trusted' program?
>
What program is it? How are you starting the program? Can the program be
placed in the Start-up folder and started without you manually starting it?
 
H

H Brown

#8
"Sam Holbrook" <samuel.holbrook@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:us8F6F6kJHA.2460@xxxxxx

> I have Windows Vista Home Premium as my OS.
> I have a program that I use daily.
> To get it to work correctly I had to check 'run as administrator'.
> How do I now get the program to be a 'known' and 'trusted' program?
>
> TIA.
>
> Regards,
> Sam Holbrook
>
Hi Sam
Rick Rogers gave you the very best solution for what it is you really wish
to accomplish.
It will be to your benefit to follow his advise.

If the program your referring to was allowed to write to the protected
system folder nothing good would come of it.
Other programs you use and depend on just as much as this one, along with
programs you may install later on would more than likely have problems.

For many years and *before Vista*, _viable_ program distributors have
realized the advantages their customers computer systems operations received
when they designed their programs to run within the user environment in
various Operating Systems.

If the distributor of your referenced program does not have a Vista
compatible version, look for a software distributor that does build a Vista
compatible program that will do the job you need to accomplish.

It also maybe to your benefit to post hear what software program and version
your talking about and some of your machines specs, memory, CPU along with
other programs you use in conjunction with the program your talking about.
With that info someone maybe able to offer some additional suggestions.

>Rick Rogers wrote
>Contact the program distributor for a Vista-compatible version. This
>happens because the program is not following the guidelines established for
>running within the user environment instead of the system environment. It's
>trying to write to a protected system folder during operation and this is
>not allowed in a Vista system.
 
S

Sam Holbrook

#9
Hi H Brown,

As stated previously my OS is WinVista Home Prem.
The application suite was written, tested and designed to be installed on
WinVista Business.
To get all the features of the suite to work it has to be 'run as
administrator'.
This has lead to a number of UAC popups.
WinVista Home Prem does't have the secpol.msc snap-in.
I though that if it was an 'easy' task I would attempt to manually modify
the system parameters that would have been set if the program suite indeed
had been installed on a PC running WinVista Business.
It appears that 'easy' is not the case.

Regards,
Sam Holbrook

"H Brown" <karenandhallie@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:eLvF$fVlJHA.5980@xxxxxx

>
>
> "Sam Holbrook" <samuel.holbrook@xxxxxx> wrote in message
> news:us8F6F6kJHA.2460@xxxxxx

>> I have Windows Vista Home Premium as my OS.
>> I have a program that I use daily.
>> To get it to work correctly I had to check 'run as administrator'.
>> How do I now get the program to be a 'known' and 'trusted' program?
>>
>> TIA.
>>
>> Regards,
>> Sam Holbrook
>>
> Hi Sam
> Rick Rogers gave you the very best solution for what it is you really wish
> to accomplish.
> It will be to your benefit to follow his advise.
>
> If the program your referring to was allowed to write to the protected
> system folder nothing good would come of it.
> Other programs you use and depend on just as much as this one, along with
> programs you may install later on would more than likely have problems.
>
> For many years and *before Vista*, _viable_ program distributors have
> realized the advantages their customers computer systems operations
> received when they designed their programs to run within the user
> environment in various Operating Systems.
>
> If the distributor of your referenced program does not have a Vista
> compatible version, look for a software distributor that does build a
> Vista compatible program that will do the job you need to accomplish.
>
> It also maybe to your benefit to post hear what software program and
> version your talking about and some of your machines specs, memory, CPU
> along with other programs you use in conjunction with the program your
> talking about. With that info someone maybe able to offer some additional
> suggestions.
>

>>Rick Rogers wrote
>>Contact the program distributor for a Vista-compatible version. This
>>happens because the program is not following the guidelines established
>>for running within the user environment instead of the system environment.
>>It's trying to write to a protected system folder during operation and
>>this is not allowed in a Vista system.
>
>
>
 
H

H Brown

#10
This solution worked for others.
Go to
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...E9-B581-47B0-B45E-492DD6DA2971&displaylang=en
Down load: Microsoft Application Compatibility Toolkit 5.0
From this page you can find what others have downloaded to help them, and
other files that maybe to your benefit as well.
Here are some simple instructions that I copied from the site below that you
can use.
http://blog.tiensivu.com/aaron/arch...ol-Prompt-for-a-certain-application-only.html
They are as follows:

"How to disable the User Account Control Prompt for a certain application
only"
A quick run down:
1. Install the Application Compatibility Toolkit 5.0.
2. In the Start menu, locate the Compatibility Administrator inside the ACT
folder. Right-click it and Run as administrator.
3. In the left hand pane, right-click on the database under Custom Databases
and select Create New, and select Application Fix.
4. Enter the name of the application you want to alter and browse to it to
select it.
5. Click Next until you are in the Compatibility Fixes screen.
6. On the Compatibility Fixes screen, find the item RunAsInvoker, and check
it.
7. Click Next and Finish.
8. Select File and Save As. Save the file as appname.sdb in a directory you
will easily find it.
9. Copy the appname.sdb file to the Vista computer you want to alter the
elevation prompt behavior on.
10. Click Start>All Programs>Accessories. Right click Command Prompt and
click Run as administrator.
11. Run the command: sdbinst appname.sdb

It should display: Installation of "appname" complete.

This should take care of your issue, post back here and let us know your
results.
H Brown




"Sam Holbrook" <samuel.holbrook@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:#ysnH1hlJHA.6060@xxxxxx

> Hi H Brown,
>
> As stated previously my OS is WinVista Home Prem.
> The application suite was written, tested and designed to be installed on
> WinVista Business.
> To get all the features of the suite to work it has to be 'run as
> administrator'.
> This has lead to a number of UAC popups.
> WinVista Home Prem does't have the secpol.msc snap-in.
> I though that if it was an 'easy' task I would attempt to manually modify
> the system parameters that would have been set if the program suite indeed
> had been installed on a PC running WinVista Business.
> It appears that 'easy' is not the case.
>
> Regards,
> Sam Holbrook
>
> "H Brown" <karenandhallie@xxxxxx> wrote in message
> news:eLvF$fVlJHA.5980@xxxxxx

>>
>>
>> "Sam Holbrook" <samuel.holbrook@xxxxxx> wrote in message
>> news:us8F6F6kJHA.2460@xxxxxx

>>> I have Windows Vista Home Premium as my OS.
>>> I have a program that I use daily.
>>> To get it to work correctly I had to check 'run as administrator'.
>>> How do I now get the program to be a 'known' and 'trusted' program?
>>>
>>> TIA.
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Sam Holbrook
>>>
>> Hi Sam
>> Rick Rogers gave you the very best solution for what it is you really
>> wish to accomplish.
>> It will be to your benefit to follow his advise.
>>
>> If the program your referring to was allowed to write to the protected
>> system folder nothing good would come of it.
>> Other programs you use and depend on just as much as this one, along with
>> programs you may install later on would more than likely have problems.
>>
>> For many years and *before Vista*, _viable_ program distributors have
>> realized the advantages their customers computer systems operations
>> received when they designed their programs to run within the user
>> environment in various Operating Systems.
>>
>> If the distributor of your referenced program does not have a Vista
>> compatible version, look for a software distributor that does build a
>> Vista compatible program that will do the job you need to accomplish.
>>
>> It also maybe to your benefit to post hear what software program and
>> version your talking about and some of your machines specs, memory, CPU
>> along with other programs you use in conjunction with the program your
>> talking about. With that info someone maybe able to offer some additional
>> suggestions.
>>

>>>Rick Rogers wrote
>>>Contact the program distributor for a Vista-compatible version. This
>>>happens because the program is not following the guidelines established
>>>for running within the user environment instead of the system
>>>environment. It's trying to write to a protected system folder during
>>>operation and this is not allowed in a Vista system.
>>
>>
>>
>
>