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Vista activation

A

Aaron

#1
I recently added a new hard drive to my computer because the old one died,
and I had to place Vista on a different hard drive. Now my old activation
key is not valid, but for all other purposes my computer is exactly the same
except for the new HD, although it probably appears to the program that it is
a different computer.

Does this mean every time a new component is added, a person has to pay $60
for a new key? I can understand if Windows is put on an entirely new
computer, but not when a new component is added. You shouldn't have to buy
the product again when you already paid for it in the first place.

Thanks.
 

My Computer

#2
No, it shouldn't.

For an OEM copy the only thing you are not allowed to change is the type of
mobo.

For a retail copy you can change anything, but may have to re-activate. The
key should still be valid though.

Mind you, I'm sill running the same PC I bought as a 286 in 1990. It's a
great computer, the best ever made. In all that time it has only needed five
new mobos, seven processsors, nine disks, four CDs, three cases....

> I recently added a new hard drive to my computer because the old one died,
> and I had to place Vista on a different hard drive. Now my old activation
> key is not valid, but for all other purposes my computer is exactly the same
> except for the new HD, although it probably appears to the program that it is
> a different computer.
>
> Does this mean every time a new component is added, a person has to pay $60
> for a new key? I can understand if Windows is put on an entirely new
> computer, but not when a new component is added. You shouldn't have to buy
> the product again when you already paid for it in the first place.
>
> Thanks.
 

My Computer

D

DurWrathi

#3
I'm having a similar issue. Just built my new rig a month ago and the hard
drive went bad. I swapped it for another hard drive and installed vista on
that. Now, when I try to activate the copy of vista on the new hard drive, it
tells me that my key is already in use. I'm using the OEM version of Vista
Home Premium. Any ideas on this? Do I need to call Microsoft to get it sorted
out?


"Ian" wrote:

> No, it shouldn't.
>
> For an OEM copy the only thing you are not allowed to change is the type of
> mobo.
>
> For a retail copy you can change anything, but may have to re-activate. The
> key should still be valid though.
>
> Mind you, I'm sill running the same PC I bought as a 286 in 1990. It's a
> great computer, the best ever made. In all that time it has only needed five
> new mobos, seven processsors, nine disks, four CDs, three cases....
>
> > I recently added a new hard drive to my computer because the old one died,
> > and I had to place Vista on a different hard drive. Now my old activation
> > key is not valid, but for all other purposes my computer is exactly the same
> > except for the new HD, although it probably appears to the program that it is
> > a different computer.
> >
> > Does this mean every time a new component is added, a person has to pay $60
> > for a new key? I can understand if Windows is put on an entirely new
> > computer, but not when a new component is added. You shouldn't have to buy
> > the product again when you already paid for it in the first place.
> >
> > Thanks.
 

My Computer

B

Brett I. Holcomb

#4
Call MS and tell them what happened. If you try and activate it you
should get a phone number to call. If not run the command slui.exe 4 in
your start->run box.


DurWrathi wrote:
> I'm having a similar issue. Just built my new rig a month ago and the hard
> drive went bad. I swapped it for another hard drive and installed vista on
> that. Now, when I try to activate the copy of vista on the new hard drive, it
> tells me that my key is already in use. I'm using the OEM version of Vista
> Home Premium. Any ideas on this? Do I need to call Microsoft to get it sorted
> out?
>
>
> "Ian" wrote:
>
>> No, it shouldn't.
>>
>> For an OEM copy the only thing you are not allowed to change is the type of
>> mobo.
>>
>> For a retail copy you can change anything, but may have to re-activate. The
>> key should still be valid though.
>>
>> Mind you, I'm sill running the same PC I bought as a 286 in 1990. It's a
>> great computer, the best ever made. In all that time it has only needed five
>> new mobos, seven processsors, nine disks, four CDs, three cases....
>>
>>> I recently added a new hard drive to my computer because the old one died,
>>> and I had to place Vista on a different hard drive. Now my old activation
>>> key is not valid, but for all other purposes my computer is exactly the same
>>> except for the new HD, although it probably appears to the program that it is
>>> a different computer.
>>>
>>> Does this mean every time a new component is added, a person has to pay $60
>>> for a new key? I can understand if Windows is put on an entirely new
>>> computer, but not when a new component is added. You shouldn't have to buy
>>> the product again when you already paid for it in the first place.
>>>
>>> Thanks.
 

My Computer

D
#5
I just went through the same problem when i upgraded my new Hard drive (see
Below) all you have to do is call the activation number and an agent will
generate a new code for you.
Hope it helps...

"Brett I. Holcomb" wrote:

> Call MS and tell them what happened. If you try and activate it you
> should get a phone number to call. If not run the command slui.exe 4 in
> your start->run box.
>
>
> DurWrathi wrote:
> > I'm having a similar issue. Just built my new rig a month ago and the hard
> > drive went bad. I swapped it for another hard drive and installed vista on
> > that. Now, when I try to activate the copy of vista on the new hard drive, it
> > tells me that my key is already in use. I'm using the OEM version of Vista
> > Home Premium. Any ideas on this? Do I need to call Microsoft to get it sorted
> > out?
> >
> >
> > "Ian" wrote:
> >
> >> No, it shouldn't.
> >>
> >> For an OEM copy the only thing you are not allowed to change is the type of
> >> mobo.
> >>
> >> For a retail copy you can change anything, but may have to re-activate. The
> >> key should still be valid though.
> >>
> >> Mind you, I'm sill running the same PC I bought as a 286 in 1990. It's a
> >> great computer, the best ever made. In all that time it has only needed five
> >> new mobos, seven processsors, nine disks, four CDs, three cases....
> >>
> >>> I recently added a new hard drive to my computer because the old one died,
> >>> and I had to place Vista on a different hard drive. Now my old activation
> >>> key is not valid, but for all other purposes my computer is exactly the same
> >>> except for the new HD, although it probably appears to the program that it is
> >>> a different computer.
> >>>
> >>> Does this mean every time a new component is added, a person has to pay $60
> >>> for a new key? I can understand if Windows is put on an entirely new
> >>> computer, but not when a new component is added. You shouldn't have to buy
> >>> the product again when you already paid for it in the first place.
> >>>
> >>> Thanks.

>
 

My Computer

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