What is minimum and maximum processor state in power management

R

Rob

What is minimum and maximum processor state in power management

side question:
Why doesn't Vista help have the answer?
 

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BillD

"Rob" wrote:

> What is minimum and maximum processor state in power management
>
> side question:
> Why doesn't Vista help have the answer?

start -> type: power, and hit Enter key -> change plan settings -> restore
default settings for this plan

start -> type: power, and hit Enter key -> change plan settings -> change
advanced power settings
 

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R

Rob

RE: What is minimum and maximum processor state in power managemen

"BillD" wrote:

>
>
> "Rob" wrote:
>

> > What is minimum and maximum processor state in power management
> >
> > side question:
> > Why doesn't Vista help have the answer?
>
> start -> type: power, and hit Enter key -> change plan settings -> restore
> default settings for this plan
>
> start -> type: power, and hit Enter key -> change plan settings -> change
> advanced power settings
>
>
Inadequate answer - RTQ

Obviously, I know how to change it - I need to know what it means.
 

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M

Michael

Re: What is minimum and maximum processor state in power managemen

Carefully examining your question.

On my Vista home premium, the minimum processor state is 0%, the maximum
processor state is 100%. This is for both battery and plugged in.

Michael


"Rob" <[email protected]***comcast.net> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

>
>
> "BillD" wrote:
>

>>
>>
>> "Rob" wrote:
>>

>> > What is minimum and maximum processor state in power management
>> >
>> > side question:
>> > Why doesn't Vista help have the answer?
>>
>> start -> type: power, and hit Enter key -> change plan settings ->
>> restore
>> default settings for this plan
>>
>> start -> type: power, and hit Enter key -> change plan settings -> change
>> advanced power settings
>>
>>
> Inadequate answer - RTQ
>
> Obviously, I know how to change it - I need to know what it means.
 

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P

Paul Smith

"Rob" <[email protected]***comcast.net> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> What is minimum and maximum processor state in power management
>
> side question:
> Why doesn't Vista help have the answer?

It basically refers to the speed of the CPU.

For example, if the maximum is 50% while on battery, the CPU frequency will
be running at 50% normal speed, prolonging battery life at the cost of
performance.

--
Paul Smith,
Yeovil, UK.
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User.
http://www.dasmirnov.net/blog/
http://www.windowsresource.net/

*Remove nospam. to reply by e-mail*
 

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Patrick

It's the minimum and maximum cpu power available.
If you set the maximum processor state in powermanagement to 50% it should
offer 50% of it's processing power max. when put under load.
With this explanation I guess you understand what the minimum is for?


"Rob" <[email protected]***comcast.net> wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> What is minimum and maximum processor state in power management
>
> side question:
> Why doesn't Vista help have the answer?
 

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S

Shaughn Shea

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agent007bond

New Member
Hello,
I've searched about this and found this page:
"Welcome to The Metaverse : Vista power management & CPU frequency"

In short, Vista is able to vary the processor clock frequency (from 0 Hz to 2.4 GHz, if your maximum processor speed is 2.4 GHz) according to the processor usage. Minimum and maximum processor state control the range within which Vista varies the clock speed.

For example, a minimum of 25% and a maximum of 75% will make Vista vary the speed between 600 MHz (25%) and 1.8 MHz (75%) for a 2.4 MHz processor. "On battery" and "plugged in" is for setting two different ranges for the charging and discharging states.

The point of reducing clock frequency is that, the higher the frequency, the more heat the processor will produce, and the more power it will consume. The lower the frequency, the more time it will take to complete a processing (calculation).

More detailed information with pictures can be found in the link given above.
Hope this helps,
~ADTC
 

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