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Why is my Vista laptop so Bloomin' slow?

M

Michelle

#1
I have a totally top of the range laptop, I am not running any of the things
like Norton that are known to cause performance problems (I use AVG
anti-virus).

I have heaps of RAM and disk-space, a fast Intel Core2 Duo chip, yet my
computer is slower than my previous seven year old one (that was running
XP).

It takes about 3 seconds to display things like the Windows Explorer window
or about 6 or 7 seconds to bring up Firefox or IE. and about 10 or 11
seconds the first time I open Outlook. That is not taking into account the
time it takes to download the web page or retieve my mail.

I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?

Thanks

M
 

My Computer

S

Straight Talk

#2
On Thu, 14 Feb 2008 09:48:37 -0000, "Michelle"
<mh_londonNOJUNK@xxxxxx> wrote:

>I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
>know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?
That's definitely not my experience - but so many things could be
causing this.


A few things you could try:

Check with your task manager if a specific program or process is using
a considerable amount of CPU.

Check for new drivers, for example for your graphics card.
 

My Computer

V

Ver!tas

#3
Welcome to the world of Windows Vista! I have asked this question before, and
alas...No info was very helpful. I play alot of video games on my laptop, but
with Vista I have to turn the graphic settings on its lowest just to get an
acceptable frame rate. People would always tell me that my hardware just sux,
even though im running AMD Duel core processor with 2 gigs of memory, and a
damn decent video card for a laptop...Well I ignored their rants and decided
to test XP on my system and guess what?? Everything ran 100% smoothly! I
could turn all my settings up to max and get perfect frames! It was very nice
having that, but what frustrated me was that I had to downgrade in order to
get an upgrade, ya know? I don't like downgrading. In the end I just decided
to conclude that Vista is just an OS that is made for performance computers
and such.

Since reading your post, that mind set of Vista being for high end computers
has changed. Your computer, as you state, is pretty spiffy. So why does Vista
run so slow?? Im pretty sure we are not the only ones who want an answer. Why
did it take me downgrading just to get the performance I need, and why does
this person's high end laptop not even able to run it?

"Michelle" wrote:

> I have a totally top of the range laptop, I am not running any of the things
> like Norton that are known to cause performance problems (I use AVG
> anti-virus).
>
> I have heaps of RAM and disk-space, a fast Intel Core2 Duo chip, yet my
> computer is slower than my previous seven year old one (that was running
> XP).
>
> It takes about 3 seconds to display things like the Windows Explorer window
> or about 6 or 7 seconds to bring up Firefox or IE. and about 10 or 11
> seconds the first time I open Outlook. That is not taking into account the
> time it takes to download the web page or retieve my mail.
>
> I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
> know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?
>
> Thanks
>
> M
>
 

My Computer

Brink

Staff member
mvp
Messages
32,202
Location
Oklahoma, USA
#4
I have a totally top of the range laptop, I am not running any of the things
like Norton that are known to cause performance problems (I use AVG
anti-virus).

I have heaps of RAM and disk-space, a fast Intel Core2 Duo chip, yet my
computer is slower than my previous seven year old one (that was running
XP).

It takes about 3 seconds to display things like the Windows Explorer window
or about 6 or 7 seconds to bring up Firefox or IE. and about 10 or 11
seconds the first time I open Outlook. That is not taking into account the
time it takes to download the web page or retieve my mail.

I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?

Thanks

M
Hi Michelle,

You can do these to help improve the performance of Vista.

http://www.vistax64.com/tutorials/81176-speed-up-performance-vista.html

Shawn
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Show second system?
    Yes
    Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
    Manufacturer/Model
    Custom
    CPU
    Intel i7-8700K 5 GHz
    Motherboard
    ASUS Maximus X Code Z370
    Memory
    16 GB (8GBx2) G.SKILL TridentZ DDR4 3200 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    ASUS ROG-STRIX-GTX1080TI-O11G-GAMING
    Sound Card
    Integrated
    Monitor(s) Displays
    3 x 27" Asus VE278Q
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080
    Hard Drives
    250GB Samsung 960 EVO M.2,
    256GB OCZ Vector,
    6TB WD Black WD6001FZWX
    PSU
    Seasonic Prime Titanium 850W
    Case
    Corsair Air 740
    Cooling
    Corsair Hydro H115i
    Mouse
    Logitech MX Master
    Keyboard
    Logitech wireless K800
    Internet Speed
    300 Mb/s Download and 30 Mb/s Upload
    Other Info
    Logitech Z625 speaker system,
    Creative F200 webcam,
    HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M477fdn,
    Linksys EA9500 router,
    Arris SB6190 cable modem,
    APC SMART-UPS RT 1000 XL,
    Lumia 1520 phone
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro
    Manufacturer/Model
    HP Envy Y0F94AV
    CPU
    i7-7500U @ 2.70 GHz
    Memory
    16 GB DDR4-2133
    Graphics card(s)
    NVIDIA GeForce 940MX
    Sound Card
    Conexant ISST Audio
    Monitor(s) Displays
    17.3" UHD IPS touch
    Screen Resolution
    3480 x 2160
    Hard Drives
    512 GB M.2 SSD
S

Saucy

#5
Well, I noticed a marked improvement on my laptop by adding a second gig of
RAM. You'd think 1GB is enough - no it's not. Vista craves RAM and the
second Gig turned a sluggish laptop into a little bit of a performer. If
your processor is a dual core job then you have to buy your RAM in matching
pairs. I got two 1GB sticks yesterday for just $39 a stick and it made all
the difference. Of course I don't know what to do with the two 512MB sticks
I removed .. maybe ebay.

You might note that harddrives on laptopps are often just 5400 RPM jobs ..
they work slower than the 7200 RPM harddrives typically installed to
desktops so initial loadings are a bit slower than desktops - but even
that's better with more RAM as there's much less writing to pagefiles etc.
If your laptop's harddrive isn't marked as SCSI [mine is], then you can
optimize the performance .. go to Device Manger and root around your
harddrive's settings.

I can't account for Firefox - I wouldn't run it (I think it's junk and a
decided security risk) but IE on first run might take an extra moment to
connect to the Internet for the first time.

Defrag your disk of course.

I tried Readyboost before - it was a flop - I think it actually slowed
things down but not having stop watched it I'm not sure .. but it seemed so.

Oh .. one thing I almost forgot. When I get a laptop, I download the
essential drivers for it from the manufacturer's website and burn them to
DVD/CD-R. Then I wipe the harddrive and install a *generic* copy of Windows.
All that bloat / junk /cr*p-ware gets is gone and I have a much more
pleasant experience with Windows. You might have a look to see if you are
running an arms long list of junk software on startup. A typical laptop
these days is just bloody loaded with it. So disable the junk or maybe even
get someone to do up your laptop right. Please note wiping the harddrive
might affect the warranty.

'Hope this helps,
Saucy


"Michelle" <mh_londonNOJUNK@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:6BEA1288-71F1-4265-AEFB-EBBFB26367DD@xxxxxx

>I have a totally top of the range laptop, I am not running any of the
>things like Norton that are known to cause performance problems (I use AVG
>anti-virus).
>
> I have heaps of RAM and disk-space, a fast Intel Core2 Duo chip, yet my
> computer is slower than my previous seven year old one (that was running
> XP).
>
> It takes about 3 seconds to display things like the Windows Explorer
> window or about 6 or 7 seconds to bring up Firefox or IE. and about 10 or
> 11 seconds the first time I open Outlook. That is not taking into account
> the time it takes to download the web page or retieve my mail.
>
> I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
> know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?
>
> Thanks
>
> M
 

My Computer

I

IkidUnot

#6
It is good advice to check what's being run when Windows starts. There is
the potential of lots of little things that just aren't really necessary.
Sidebar gadgets can add up too.

Another thing I've found is that Windows' Indexing Service takes a lot of
resources. It can make your computer busy for over six minutes at startup.
This is especially true with a new PC whose contents have not been indexed.
You may elect to put up with or to turn off indexing service.

There are some applications that can help in seeing what's going on. If you
go to sysinternals.com you can try out "Process Explorer" or the even more
powerful "Process Monitor;" another good one is "Autoruns" which can help
you see what starts when Windows starts. Good luck, and let this forum know
what you find - it can help other people.
--
-me.
Let this forum know if this helps or if you figure out the problem, so
others can benefit.



"Michelle" wrote:

> I have a totally top of the range laptop, I am not running any of the things
> like Norton that are known to cause performance problems (I use AVG
> anti-virus).
>
> I have heaps of RAM and disk-space, a fast Intel Core2 Duo chip, yet my
> computer is slower than my previous seven year old one (that was running
> XP).
>
> It takes about 3 seconds to display things like the Windows Explorer window
> or about 6 or 7 seconds to bring up Firefox or IE. and about 10 or 11
> seconds the first time I open Outlook. That is not taking into account the
> time it takes to download the web page or retieve my mail.
>
> I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
> know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?
>
> Thanks
>
> M
>
 

My Computer

G

Gary Mount

#7
" If your processor is a dual core job then you have to buy your RAM in
matching pairs."

You are mistaking dual channel ram with a dual core cpu. I am running a
Pentium 4, single core (but with Hyperthreading) and I am running my ram in
dual channel. I can also run my computer in standard/non dual channel mode.
If you want to run your ram in dual channel mode, you need two matching
sticks of ram. Not dual cores.
If you don't care about the small performance boost you might get with dual
channel, you can mix and match your ram in any configuration you like. The
type of CPU you are running doesn't matter with regards to either option you
choose.
If you happen to be running the new skultrail system from Intel, you can use
4 channel ram. But not many people will be running an somewhat expensive
system like that,

"Saucy" <saucylemon@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:e7jbFW1bIHA.4844@xxxxxx

> Well, I noticed a marked improvement on my laptop by adding a second gig
> of RAM. You'd think 1GB is enough - no it's not. Vista craves RAM and the
> second Gig turned a sluggish laptop into a little bit of a performer. If
> your processor is a dual core job then you have to buy your RAM in
> matching pairs. I got two 1GB sticks yesterday for just $39 a stick and it
> made all the difference. Of course I don't know what to do with the two
> 512MB sticks I removed .. maybe ebay.
>
> You might note that harddrives on laptopps are often just 5400 RPM jobs ..
> they work slower than the 7200 RPM harddrives typically installed to
> desktops so initial loadings are a bit slower than desktops - but even
> that's better with more RAM as there's much less writing to pagefiles etc.
> If your laptop's harddrive isn't marked as SCSI [mine is], then you can
> optimize the performance .. go to Device Manger and root around your
> harddrive's settings.
>
> I can't account for Firefox - I wouldn't run it (I think it's junk and a
> decided security risk) but IE on first run might take an extra moment to
> connect to the Internet for the first time.
>
> Defrag your disk of course.
>
> I tried Readyboost before - it was a flop - I think it actually slowed
> things down but not having stop watched it I'm not sure .. but it seemed
> so.
>
> Oh .. one thing I almost forgot. When I get a laptop, I download the
> essential drivers for it from the manufacturer's website and burn them to
> DVD/CD-R. Then I wipe the harddrive and install a *generic* copy of
> Windows. All that bloat / junk /cr*p-ware gets is gone and I have a much
> more pleasant experience with Windows. You might have a look to see if you
> are running an arms long list of junk software on startup. A typical
> laptop these days is just bloody loaded with it. So disable the junk or
> maybe even get someone to do up your laptop right. Please note wiping the
> harddrive might affect the warranty.
>
> 'Hope this helps,
> Saucy
>
>
> "Michelle" <mh_londonNOJUNK@xxxxxx> wrote in message
> news:6BEA1288-71F1-4265-AEFB-EBBFB26367DD@xxxxxx

>>I have a totally top of the range laptop, I am not running any of the
>>things like Norton that are known to cause performance problems (I use AVG
>>anti-virus).
>>
>> I have heaps of RAM and disk-space, a fast Intel Core2 Duo chip, yet my
>> computer is slower than my previous seven year old one (that was running
>> XP).
>>
>> It takes about 3 seconds to display things like the Windows Explorer
>> window or about 6 or 7 seconds to bring up Firefox or IE. and about 10 or
>> 11 seconds the first time I open Outlook. That is not taking into account
>> the time it takes to download the web page or retieve my mail.
>>
>> I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
>> know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> M
>
 

My Computer

R

Robinb

#8
also go to "run" and type: msconfig

then click on the "startup tab"
there might be a bunch of stuff running in there that you really do not
need, for example:
These do not need to be in startup:
quicktime
adobe reader
a few graphic programs (you need to check on your computer which ones)
your cd burning software doesn't need to startup
Live Messenger
AOL if you use that- you can click on the icon to get online
If you are not sure you can post here what you have there and i and others
can tell you which ones you can uncheck.
Once you uncheck them you will need a reboot
Once it reboots the system utility will come up and all you do is check it
so it doesn't always come up each time you start your computer

robin


"IkidUnot" <IkidUnot@xxxxxx> wrote in message
news:C2F4C261-21BF-40A2-B9E4-8B1402FCA974@xxxxxx

> It is good advice to check what's being run when Windows starts. There is
> the potential of lots of little things that just aren't really necessary.
> Sidebar gadgets can add up too.
>
> Another thing I've found is that Windows' Indexing Service takes a lot of
> resources. It can make your computer busy for over six minutes at
> startup.
> This is especially true with a new PC whose contents have not been
> indexed.
> You may elect to put up with or to turn off indexing service.
>
> There are some applications that can help in seeing what's going on. If
> you
> go to sysinternals.com you can try out "Process Explorer" or the even more
> powerful "Process Monitor;" another good one is "Autoruns" which can help
> you see what starts when Windows starts. Good luck, and let this forum
> know
> what you find - it can help other people.
> --
> -me.
> Let this forum know if this helps or if you figure out the problem, so
> others can benefit.
>
>
>
> "Michelle" wrote:
>

>> I have a totally top of the range laptop, I am not running any of the
>> things
>> like Norton that are known to cause performance problems (I use AVG
>> anti-virus).
>>
>> I have heaps of RAM and disk-space, a fast Intel Core2 Duo chip, yet my
>> computer is slower than my previous seven year old one (that was running
>> XP).
>>
>> It takes about 3 seconds to display things like the Windows Explorer
>> window
>> or about 6 or 7 seconds to bring up Firefox or IE. and about 10 or 11
>> seconds the first time I open Outlook. That is not taking into account
>> the
>> time it takes to download the web page or retieve my mail.
>>
>> I am using the default settings in Vista, are there features in Vista (I
>> know it monitors everything) that could be slowing me down this much?
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> M
>>
 

My Computer

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