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windows\system32\config\regback\software

#1
I have an HP intel Core 2 Quad 4GB 64 Bit Vista PC, about once a week my computer has a mind of its own and pegs my hard drive by executing tasks like the ones below for several hours.

C:\windows\system32\config\regback\software
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\system
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\Sam
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\security
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\Default

How can I schedule the tasks when I am not using my computer?

Thank you
Jeff
 

Janx

New Member
#2
I just got an HP a couple weeks ago and the exact same thing is happening every Saturday! Please post if you've found a solution and I will do the same.
 
#3
Hello Janx,

I opend a case with Microsoft, they claim this is a normal Vista process, that would be OK but my system is slower than a snail for several hours. I noticed HP stopped selling my Pavilion Model m9250f. What Model HP do you have?

Microsoft Answer
That is registry backup happening every Monday , That is windows process , that is important for the system to happen every Monday , You cannot stop that process . That is normal , Its happening for all windows operating system .Why that is important to happen ? suppose your computer is going to no boot situation in order to do system restore we need to have that backup files.

In this process includes 5 files

C:\windows\system32\config\regback\software
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\system
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\Sam
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\security
C:\windows\system32\config\regback\Default

You no need to worry about that , Its normal ,Please let me send Email if you have any issue or question

Regards,

Banjo200
 

Janx

New Member
#4
I have the same HP model - m9250f! My system crawls for several hours every Saturday. Very frustrating as you can't do anything all day! Then poof, the regback finishes and system returns to normal. Crazy.
 
Last edited:
#6
I would be interested why HP discontinued our HP Pavilon Model. People running Vista 32 bit do not have the same issue with the RegBack slow performance issue.

I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the other takes over. I wonder if this could be part of the problem
 

Janx

New Member
#7
I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the other takes over. I wonder if this could be part of the problem
I do not have 2 drives and RAID 0. I have a 750GB drive only.

Just got a reply from HP. I'm not sure if they are addressing the actual issue. It looks more like general performance troubleshooting but I plan to give it a try and see what happens Saturday. Here's what they wrote me:

Thank you for contacting HP Total Care.
From your email I see that, the performance of the HP Pavilion Elite m9350f Desktop PC is very low.
I greatly appreciate that you have forwarded your concerns and have given me a chance to assist you with this matter. I will certainly assist you in this regard.
Daniel, I can understand such issues with the new PC can be very upsetting. To resolve this issue, I request you install the below updates.
1. Windows Vista hot fix. Please visit the below HP URL to download and install the fix:
ftp://ftp.hp.com/pub/softlib/software10/COL24606/pv-63296-1/sp37542.exe
Installation Instructions
1. Click the Download Only button.
2. At the File Download screen, click the Save button.
3. At the Save As screen, save the file to your Desktop.
4. If a message appears stating that the file already exists, click YES to overwrite file.
5. Double-click the icon for the update downloaded to your desktop, and then click NEXT.
6. Follow on-screen instructions.
7. If prompted to restart the system upon completion of the update, click YES and allow system to restart.
2. After installing the Vista hot fix, please visit the below HP URL to download and install the Video driver update:
ftp://ftp.hp.com/pub/softlib/software10/COL23991/pv-62013-1/sp37520.exe
Installation Instructions
1. Click the Download Only button.
2. At the File Download screen, click the Save button.
3. At the Save As screen, save the file to your Desktop.
4. If a message appears stating that the file already exists, click YES to overwrite file.
5. Double-click the icon for the update downloaded to your desktop, and then click NEXT.
6. Follow on-screen instructions.
7. If prompted to restart the system upon completion of the update, click YES and allow system to restart.
3. After installing the video driver, please visit the below HP URL to download and install the BIOS update:
ftp://ftp.hp.com/pub/softlib/software10/COL24178/pv-62411-1/sp37533.exe
Installation Instructions
1. Click the Download Only button.
2. At the File Download screen, click the Save button.
3. At the Save As screen, save the file to your Desktop.
4. If a message appears stating that the file already exists, click YES to overwrite file.
5. Double-click the icon for the update downloaded to your desktop, and then click NEXT.
6. Follow on-screen instructions.
7. If prompted to restart the system upon completion of the update, click YES and allow system to restart.
After installing the above updates, please perform the steps provided in the below HP URL. Instead of providing information in a text format, we are referring you to the web site where the information is explained with graphics and hyperlinks. I am sure this should be helpful to you. The link is:
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&cc=us&docname=c00815926&dlc=en
NOTE: Clicking the link may give an error indicating it is invalid. If this occurs, copy the portion of the address on the remaining line(S) and paste it at the end of the address showing in your browser until the complete address is displayed in the Address box.
I believe the above steps should increase the system performance. If you find any difficulty in performing the steps or for further assistance, please reply to this message and would be here round the clock to serve you.
For information on keeping your HP and Compaq products up and running, please visit our Web site at:
http://www.hp.com/go/totalcare
 

Janx

New Member
#8
I have the same HP model - m9250f! My system crawls for several hours every Saturday. Very frustrating as you can't do anything all day! Then poof, the regback finishes and system retunrs to normal. Crazy.
Correction! I have the m9350f. Sorry for any confusion. Still same issue though!
 

Janx

New Member
#9
I followed the steps from HP. I carefully read the release notes as I installed and it doesn't appear that any of the "fixes" have anything to do with regback. There was also some general performance tuning steps. I guess I will wait and see what happens Saturday. I have a feeling that I will be writing HP another note.
 
#10
I also have the m9350f and have the same slow performance issues (every week).

Try running chkdsk and defraging your hard drive every week.

It may be a power supply, motherboard or SATA connection on motherboard issue.

This only has a 460 watt power supply in it, I think it is not enough for this hardware.
 
#11
Also there is a BIOS update at the HP website for the m9350f.
Mine was version 5.22
The new one is 5.24

Not sure if that is a fix or not but everything went smooth during the update here.
 
A

AlanX

#12
Hi Guys,

I was just browsing to find out what the hell RegBack was as my HDD was
going mad.

I'm running Vista Home Premium 64 on a custom built rig so I dont think
it is anything to do with you guys having HP machines.

Mine only takes about 5 mins to run though. Not hours like you guys
said although my system is heavily overclocked.

Try backing up all your media and doing a fresh installation of Vista.
It sounds like your registries are full of rubish from having Vista
installed for too long without a good clean-up.
Alternatively, try installing a good reg clean-up tool.

The more rubbish and the more fragmented your registry becomes, the
slower Windows and regback will run.


--
AlanX
------------------------------------------------------------------------
AlanX's Profile: http://forums.techarena.in/members/alanx.htm
View this thread: http://forums.techarena.in/windows-vista-performance/1041955.htm

http://forums.techarena.in
 

Janx

New Member
#13
Hey! I don't believe it but the HP fix worked! I watched my system closely this morning and when regback started running it didn't hog the disk read/write. I launched several apps to test performance and everything worked fine. Also, regback only ran a couple minutes this time. Perhaps one of the vista hot fixes HP gave me did the trick after all. Try following the directions in my previous post (Note -At least one update was a driver for my video card so only do what makes sense on your machine).
 

Janx

New Member
#14
One other thing I should mention. A friend of mine gave me a good idea to try. If the problem persisted and I couldn't resolve my next step was to change my time zone on Friday nights to trick the system to run regback in the middle of the night. Banjo, Might be worth a try if the HP fix doesn't work for you.
 
#15
GREAT NEWS , I just sent HP an e-mail to validate if I can add the same hot fixes to my HP Pavilion Elite m9250f PC in an attempt to resolve the regback performance problem.

Thank you
 

Barman58

Staff member
Vista Guru
Gold Member
#16
I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the other takes over
Hi Banjo,

Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup option you may want


  • RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all disks will be lost if any one disk fails.

  • RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution, using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive, in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining drives (second, third, etc).

  • RAID 5 (striped disks with parity) combines three or more disks in a way that protects data against loss of any one disk; the storage capacity of the array is reduced by one disk.

  • RAID 6 (less common) can recover from the loss of two disks.

  • RAID 10 (or 1+0) uses both striping and mirroring.

above from the article in Wikipedia
RAID - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


As to the scheduling of this backup you may be able to alter the schedule in task scheduler
 
K

Ken Blake, MVP

#17
On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 14:38:53 -0500, barman58 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
wrote:

>

> > I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the
> > other takes overHi Banjo,
>
> Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup
> option you may want
>
>
>
> - RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a
> way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all
> disks will be lost if any one disk fails.

That's correct, except that in practice RAID 0 usually proves either
*no* improved speed or such a tiny amount that it can be ignored. The
one thing it mostly does is dramatically increase the risk to what's
on the drives; that tiny increase in performance (if any) is not worth
the greatly increased risk.



> - RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution,

I completely disagree.

Most people completely misunderstand what RAID 1 is all about.
RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or more
drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy, not
backup. It's used in situations (almost always within corporations,
not in homes) where any downtime can't be tolerated, because the way
it works is that if one drive fails the other takes over seamlessly
and almost instantly.

Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup technique, that is
*not* what it is, since it's subject to simultaneous loss of the
original and the mirror to many of the most common dangers threatening
your data--severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, user
errors, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most companies that
use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in place.


Read my thoughts on backup here:
http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=314

Also read here: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea
http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29


> using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that
> data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the
> array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive,
> in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase
> the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining
> drives (second, third, etc).
--
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
 
#18
Hello Nigel,

Thank you, I stand corrected I have RAID 1 applied the (2) 500GB Drives act as (1) Drive, I am using the Intel Matrix Storage Console that is part of my HP PC. If (1) drive fails I am protected.

Thank you,

Jeff

I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the other takes over
Hi Banjo,

Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup option you may want


  • RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all disks will be lost if any one disk fails.
  • RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution, using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive, in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining drives (second, third, etc).
  • RAID 5 (striped disks with parity) combines three or more disks in a way that protects data against loss of any one disk; the storage capacity of the array is reduced by one disk.
  • RAID 6 (less common) can recover from the loss of two disks.
  • RAID 10 (or 1+0) uses both striping and mirroring.
above from the article in Wikipedia
RAID - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


As to the scheduling of this backup you may be able to alter the schedule in task scheduler
 
#19
Hello Ken

Thank you, I have RAID 1, I have (2) 500GB Drives but they act as (1) so if the primary hard drive fails the secondary drive takes over.

Thanks

Jeff

I just sent an email to HP support to see if they can help. I'll let you know what they say.
On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 14:38:53 -0500, barman58 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
wrote:
>
> > I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails the
> > other takes overHi Banjo,
>
> Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the backup
> option you may want
>
>
>
> - RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in a
> way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on all
> disks will be lost if any one disk fails.

That's correct, except that in practice RAID 0 usually proves either
*no* improved speed or such a tiny amount that it can be ignored. The
one thing it mostly does is dramatically increase the risk to what's
on the drives; that tiny increase in performance (if any) is not worth
the greatly increased risk.


> - RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution,

I completely disagree.

Most people completely misunderstand what RAID 1 is all about.
RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or more
drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy, not
backup. It's used in situations (almost always within corporations,
not in homes) where any downtime can't be tolerated, because the way
it works is that if one drive fails the other takes over seamlessly
and almost instantly.

Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup technique, that is
*not* what it is, since it's subject to simultaneous loss of the
original and the mirror to many of the most common dangers threatening
your data--severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, user
errors, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most companies that
use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in place.


Read my thoughts on backup here:
Back Up Your Computer Regularly and Reliably

Also read here: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea
Puget Custom Computers: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea

> using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that
> data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the
> array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one drive,
> in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase
> the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining
> drives (second, third, etc).
--
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
 
K

Ken Blake, MVP

#20
On Sun, 5 Oct 2008 13:17:09 -0500, Banjo200 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
wrote:

>
> Hello Ken
>
> Thank you, I have RAID 1, I have (2) 500GB Drives but they act as (1)
> so if the primary hard drive fails the secondary drive takes over.

You're welcome. But if the purpose of having RAID1 is as backup, as I
said earlier, it's a very poor approach to backup.

In fact, my view is that RAID1 is almost never a good thing for a home
user to do.



> Janx;847800 Wrote:

> > I just sent an email to HP support to see if they can help. I'll let you
> > know what they say.
>
> Ken Blake, MVP;852705 Wrote:

> > On Sat, 4 Oct 2008 14:38:53 -0500, barman58 <guest@xxxxxx-email.com>
> > wrote:

> > > > >
> > > >> > > > >
> > > > > > I have my (2) 500GB drives set up for RAID 0, so if 1 drive fails
> > > > the
> > > > > > other takes overHi Banjo,> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Are you sure you mean Raid 0 Here? that will not give you the
> > > backup
> > > > option you may want
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > - RAID 0 (striped disks) distributes data across several disks in
> > > a
> > > > way that gives improved speed and full capacity, but all data on
> > > all
> > > > disks will be lost if any one disk fails. > >
> >
> >
> > That's correct, except that in practice RAID 0 usually proves either
> > *no* improved speed or such a tiny amount that it can be ignored. The
> > one thing it mostly does is dramatically increase the risk to what's
> > on the drives; that tiny increase in performance (if any) is not
> > worth
> > the greatly increased risk.
> >
> >

> > > > >
> > > > - RAID 1 (mirrored disks) could be described as a backup solution, > >
> >
> >
> > I completely disagree.
> >
> > Most people completely misunderstand what RAID 1 is all about.
> > RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or
> > more
> > drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy, not
> > backup. It's used in situations (almost always within corporations,
> > not in homes) where any downtime can't be tolerated, because the way
> > it works is that if one drive fails the other takes over seamlessly
> > and almost instantly.
> >
> > Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup technique, that is
> > *not* what it is, since it's subject to simultaneous loss of the
> > original and the mirror to many of the most common dangers
> > threatening
> > your data--severe power glitches, nearby lightning strikes, user
> > errors, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most companies
> > that
> > use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in place.
> >
> >
> > Read my thoughts on backup here:
> > 'Back Up Your Computer Regularly and Reliably'
> > (http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=314)
> >
> > Also read here: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea
> > 'Puget Custom Computers: Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea'
> > (http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29)
> >

> > > > >
> > > > using two (possibly more) disks that each store the same data so that
> > > > data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the
> > > > array is just the capacity of a single disk. The failure of one
> > > drive,
> > > > in the event of a hardware or software malfunction, does not increase
> > > > the chance of a failure nor decrease the reliability of the remaining
> > > > drives (second, third, etc). > >
> >
> > --
> > Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
> > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
>
>
> --
> Banjo200
--
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Please Reply to the Newsgroup