Help me plz - Group Policy logon is denied.. The media is write protected

trapzone

New Member
My PC got infected with a w32.virut virus.. so after searchin for a solution.. i had ir removed using symantec virut removal tool.. run the tool while my PC is at safe mode and internet off... And when its all done and restarted my pc at normal mode.. My PC keeps turning off and when i get back on and login to Admintrator acct, i keep getting this.. The Group Policy logon is denied.. The media is write protected :( :( :( Hope someone out here can help me out.. Thanks in advance and more power!!! xoxo
 

My Computer

Lorien

Account Suspended
I've sent a message to our security and malware removal specialist asking her to take a look at your problem and see if she has any suggestions. Unfortunately, though she was here when i started the message, she had logged off before I sent it so it may be a while before she responds. In the meantime, try the following:

Do you know when this problem began? Try a System Restore to a point in time BEFORE the problem began. Here's the procedure: http://www.vistax64.com/tutorials/76905-system-restore-how.html. Be sure to check the box to show more than 5 days of restore points. If the first attempt fails, then try an earlier point or two. NOTE: You will have to re-install any software and updates you installed between now and the restore point, but you can use Windows Update for the updates. Use the recovery disk if the system prompt doesn’t work. The recovery disk works a bit different from the above procedures but if you follow the prompts from the System Restore menu option with the above information you should be able to restore with no problems. This may restore the virus as well, so it may need to be removed again, but I would hold off on the procedure you used before as it seems it caused a lot of problems. Let's let our expert advise you what to do if we can at least restore you to working condition but even if we get it working again, I'd try to avoid using it as much as possible - especially going on the internet - as using it may spread the infection (but you can run some of the tests and procedures that follow - especially the malware removal and logging procedures but the others as well).


If the System Restore doesn't work, do a Startup Repair by booting to the genuine Windows Vista Installation Disk (or one you can borrow from ANYONE) or from a Recovery Disk with recovery options included on it. Here's the procedure: http://www.vistax64.com/tutorials/91467-startup-repair.html. To boot to the CD you may need to change the BIOS to make the CD-drive first in the boot sequence. To do that, wait for the screen that tells you the F key to push to access the boot menu or boot setup. Push it quickly. Make the changes, save your work, and exit. Put the CD in the drive and reboot. When prompted, push any key to boot from the CD.

If you don't have either disk, you can make a bootable Recovery Disk using http://neosmart.net/blog/2008/windows-vista-recovery-disc-download/ along with burning software like: http://www.snapfiles.com/get/active-isoburner.html and, of course, a blank CD (perhaps made on a different computer or perhaps in safe mode with networking if that is working).

Try to boot into safe mode (repeatedly click the F8 key while booting and go to safe mode with networking – or do so from the command prompt on the disk). Then let's check some of your system files:

Go to Start / All Programs / Accessories / Command prompt and right click on command prompt and click run as Administrator (you can skip this step if using the disk).

If using the disk, cd to C:\Windows\System32. Type sfc /scannow and enter and let it run. It will scan and try to fix some of your system files. Hopefully it will complete with no corruption it could not repair (if there is such corruption post back here or try to analyze it to find the problem file(s) using http://support.microsoft.com/kb/928228. Try to attach the report (you may need to copy it to your desktop before it will permit you to attach it) here so we can see if they can be repaired with good copies from the installation disk (unless there are too many).


While in Command Prompt, type chkdsk /f /r and enter and let it run. It will want to schedule itself to run at the next restart. Answer yes and then reboot to run the program. It will scan and try to fix any corruption or bad sectors on your hard drive and mostly remove that as a potential cause.


If that doesn't work, then please post any error messages from the Event Viewer concerning startup (Start / Control Panel / Administrative Tools / Event Viewer). Here's how to use Event Viewer: http://www.petri.co.il/vista-event-viewer.htm. Look in the System section.


You may be infected with malware (or still infected with malware - perhaps the removal didn't work or the restore put it back again and there may be others as well). Try to run anti-malware programs (in safe mode with networking if necessary). To fix this problem (if it is a problem) download, install, and run the following two programs: http://www.malwarebytes.org/mbam.php and http://www.safer-networking.org/en/index.html. You may also want to try the new, free Microsoft Security Essentials http://www.softpedia.com/progDownload/Microsoft-Security-Essentials-Download-131683.html (with the caveat that only ONE AV program can be installed and running on your system at any one time). Use removal tools when appropriate http://www.raymond.cc/blog/archives/2009/05/05/comprehensive-list-of-uninstallers-or-removal-tools-for-antivirus-software/. You may also want to try the free Avira at: http://www.free-av.com/ and Avast at: http://www.avast.com/index. Reboot after completing all the scans. You may also want to try the free OneCare at http://onecare.live.com/site/en-us/center/whatsnew.htm and let it run all the options (except the registry cleaner) because that’s good maintenance (it will take some time to complete but can be done in the background). Attach the Malwarebytes report log to your reply as I'm sure our expert will want to see that - and include any logs produced by these other products as well.


If that doesn't work, try a clean boot http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929135. If the problem goes away then it's just a matter of tracking down the culprit causing the problem. Follow the procedures in the article. Once found, delete, remove, deactivate, or uninstall it. Once done be sure to reset Vista back to normal status as explained in the procedures. If the problem occurs in clean mode then just restore the system to normal status and reboot - this solution is not going to work.


I don't want to go any further at this stage until she's had a chance to examine the problem and provide recommendations. I'm just hoping what I suggest here may at least get you up and running again - at least to the point where you can carry out any instructions she may offer.


Please post back with results of what happened with what you tried above (and the requested attached files) and if the infection is back and/or still there and how it seems to be affecting your system.


I hope this helps until someone who can truly help with the infection can offer assistance (either directly or perhaps by advising me).


Good luck!
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inc. MP061 Inspiron E1705
    CPU
    2.00 gigahertz Intel Core 2 Duo 64 kilobyte primary memory
    Motherboard
    Board: Dell Inc. 0YD479 Bus Clock: 166 megahertz
    Memory
    2046 Megabytes Usable Installed Memory
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1400 (Microsoft Corporation - WDDM) [Di
    Sound Card
    SigmaTel High Definition Audio CODEC
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Generic PnP Monitor (17.2"vis)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1200 pixels
    Hard Drives
    Hitachi HTS541616J9SA00 [Hard drive] (160.04 GB) -- drive 0, s/n SB2411SJGLLRMB, rev SB4OC74P, SMART Status: Healthy
    Case
    Chassis Serial Number: 5YK95C1
    Mouse
    Logitech HID-compliant Cordless Mouse
    Keyboard
    Standard PS/2 Keyboard
    Internet Speed
    1958 Kbps download ; 754.8 Kbps upload
    Other Info
    Optiarc DVD+-RW AD-5540A ATA Device [CD-ROM drive]

    Dell AIO Printer A940

    Conexant HDA D110 MDC V.92 Modem

    6TO4 Adapter
    Broadcom 440x 10/100 Integrated Controller
    Broadcom 802.11n Network Adapter
    Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
    Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface

    Router Linksys / WRT54G -01

Jacee

Security
Vista Guru
My PC got infected with a w32.virut virus
Your system is infected with a nasty variant of Virut, a polymorphic file infector with IRCBot functionality which infects .exe, .scr files, and opens a back door that compromises your computer. Using this backdoor, a remote attacker can access and instruct the infected computer to download and execute more malicious files.

-- Note: As with most malware infections, the threat name may be different depending on the anti-virus or anti-malware program which detected it. Each security vendor uses their own naming conventions to identify various types of malware.

With this particular infection, the safest solution and only sure way to remove it effectively is to reformat and reinstall the OS.

According to this Norman White Paper Assessment of W32/Virut, some variants can infect the HOSTS file and block access to security related web sites. Other variants of virut can even penetrate and infect .exe files within compressed files (.zip, .cab, rar). The Virux and Win32/Virut.17408 variants are an even more complex file infectors which can embed an iframe into the body of web-related files and infect script files (.php, .asp, .htm, .html, .xml). When Virut creates infected files, it also creates non-functional files that are corrupted beyond repair and in some instances can disable Windows File Protection. In many cases the infected files cannot be disinfected properly by your anti-virus. When disinfection is attempted, the files become corrupted and the system may become irreparable. The longer virut remains on a computer, the more critical system files will become infected and corrupt so the degree of infection can vary.

The virus disables Windows File Protection by injecting code into the "winlogon.exe" process that patches system code in memory.
CA Virus detail of W32/Virut

The virus has a number of bugs in its code, and as a result it may misinfect a proportion of executable files....some W32/Virut.h infections are corrupted beyond repair.
McAfee Risk Assessment and Overview of W32/Virut

There are bugs in the viral code. When the virus produces infected files, it also creates non-functional files that also contain the virus...Due to the damaged caused to files by virut it's possible to find repaired but corrupted files. They became corrupted by the incorrect writing of the viral code during the process of infection. undetected, corrupted files (possibly still containing part of the viral code) can also be found. this is caused by incorrectly written and non-function viral code present in these files.
AVG Overview of W32/Virut
Virut is commonly spread via a flash drive (usb, pen, thumb, jump) infection using RUNDLL32.EXE and other malicious files. It is often contracted by visiting remote, crack and keygen sites. These type of sites are infested with a smörgåsbord of malware and a major source of system infection.

...warez and crack web pages are being used by cybercriminals as download sites for malware related to VIRUT and VIRUX. Searches for serial numbers, cracks, and even antivirus products like Trend Micro yield malcodes that come in the form of executables or self-extracting files...quick links in these sites also lead to malicious files. Ads and banners are also infection vectors...
Keygen and Crack Sites Distribute VIRUX and FakeAV

However, the CA Security Advisor Research Blog have found MySpace user pages carrying the malicious Virut URL. Either way you can end up with a computer system so badly damaged that recovery is not possible and it cannot be repaired. When that happens there is nothing you can do besides reformatting and reinstalling the OS.

Since virut is not effectively disinfectable, your best option is to perform a full reformat as there is no guarantee this infection can be completely removed. In most instances it may have caused so much damage to your system files that it cannot be completely cleaned or repaired. In many cases the infected files (which can number in the thousands) cannot be deleted and anti-malware scanners cannot disinfect them properly. Further, your machine has likely been compromised by the backdoor Trojan and there is no way to be sure the computer can ever be trusted again. It is dangerous and incorrect to assume the computer is secure even if your anti-virus reports that the malware appears to have been removed.

Many experts in the security community believe that once infected with this type of malware, the best course of action is to reformat and reinstall the OS. Reinstalling Windows without first wiping the entire hard drive with a repartition and/or format will not remove the infection. The reinstall will only overwrite the Windows files. Any malware on the system will still be there afterwards. Please read:
Whenever a system has been compromised by a backdoor payload, it is impossible to know if or how much the backdoor has been used to affect your system...There are only a few ways to return a compromised system to a confident security configuration. These include:
• Reimaging the system
• Restoring the entire system using a full system backup from before the backdoor infection
• Reformatting and reinstalling the system
Backdoors and What They Mean to You

This is what Jesper M. Johansson at Microsoft TechNet has to say: Help: I Got Hacked. Now What Do I Do?.
The only way to clean a compromised system is to flatten and rebuild That’s right. If you have a system that has been completely compromised, the only thing you can do is to flatten the system (reformat the system disk) and rebuild it from scratch (reinstall Windows and your applications).
Important Note:: If your computer was used for online banking, has credit card information or other sensitive data on it, you should disconnect from the Internet until your system is cleaned. All passwords should be changed immediately to to include those used for banking, email, eBay, paypal and any online activities which require a username and password. You should consider them to be compromised. You should change each password using a clean computer and not the infected one. If not, an attacker may get the new passwords and transaction information. Banking and credit card institutions should be notified of the possible security breach. Failure to notify your financial institution and local law enforcement can result in refusal to reimburse funds lost due to fraud or similar criminal activity.
 

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Bruce ... somewhere in his 40's
    CPU
    Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU
    Motherboard
    INTEL/D975XBX2
    Memory
    4 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 2600 Pro
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SyncMaster 914v
    Screen Resolution
    1280 x 1024
    Hard Drives
    2/500GB each ... ST3500630AS ATA Device.
    One is not connected
    PSU
    Rocketfish 700 W
    Case
    G.Skill Gigabyte Chassis
    Mouse
    Microsoft PS/2 Mouse
    Keyboard
    Standard PS/2 Keyboard
    Internet Speed
    DSL
    Other Info
    ATI HDMI Audio

Lorien

Account Suspended
Thanks, Jacee, for that information. Based on that, trapzone, you can essentially ignore what I previously suggested as you need to re-install your system. More on that below.

Jacee, are the data files safe to be backed up and saved and transferred to the newly installed OS or are they too infected and thus lost? I'm hoping the data is safe to backup as I'm sure trapzone doesn't want to lose all that informantion unless there's no other alternative. I'm talking about documents and pictures, and videos, and e-mail files and things like that.

Trapzone, assuming Jacee says the data is safe, you can use Knoppix http://www.knopper.net/knoppix/index-en.html with a good ISO copier like: http://isorecorder.alexfeinman.com/isorecorder.htm along with a blank CD. This should give you enough access to the system (if you can't get in any other way) to backup your important data. Once done, you can do a clean install either using the genuine Windows Vista Installation Disk or the Recovery Disk or the Recovery Partition (whatever process is dictated by your computer manufacturer – you may need to contact them for the procedure and perhaps to get recovery disks). To do a clean install proceed as follows: http://www.winsupersite.com/showcase/winvista_install_03.asp (adapted as necessary by the procedures of your computer manufacturer). Then you will need to re-install all your programs, reset all your preferences, reconfigure your network and email settings, restore your backed up data, run Windows Update with possibly nearly 150 updates pending,...


Thank you, Jacee, for your assistance and explanation and for saving us time in futile recovery efforts when what I generally consider the last resort is the first and only option.


Trapzone, if you have any further questions, feel free to post them. Otherwise, await feedback on whether the data is safe and then, if safe, do a backup and then do the re-installation (and select a full format when provided the option).


Good luck!
 
Last edited:

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Dell Inc. MP061 Inspiron E1705
    CPU
    2.00 gigahertz Intel Core 2 Duo 64 kilobyte primary memory
    Motherboard
    Board: Dell Inc. 0YD479 Bus Clock: 166 megahertz
    Memory
    2046 Megabytes Usable Installed Memory
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Mobility Radeon X1400 (Microsoft Corporation - WDDM) [Di
    Sound Card
    SigmaTel High Definition Audio CODEC
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Generic PnP Monitor (17.2"vis)
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1200 pixels
    Hard Drives
    Hitachi HTS541616J9SA00 [Hard drive] (160.04 GB) -- drive 0, s/n SB2411SJGLLRMB, rev SB4OC74P, SMART Status: Healthy
    Case
    Chassis Serial Number: 5YK95C1
    Mouse
    Logitech HID-compliant Cordless Mouse
    Keyboard
    Standard PS/2 Keyboard
    Internet Speed
    1958 Kbps download ; 754.8 Kbps upload
    Other Info
    Optiarc DVD+-RW AD-5540A ATA Device [CD-ROM drive]

    Dell AIO Printer A940

    Conexant HDA D110 MDC V.92 Modem

    6TO4 Adapter
    Broadcom 440x 10/100 Integrated Controller
    Broadcom 802.11n Network Adapter
    Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
    Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface

    Router Linksys / WRT54G -01

Jacee

Security
Vista Guru
Documents and pictures are about the only things to backup. Before putting them back on the newly reformatted computer, they should be scanned to make sure they're okay.
 

My Computer

System One

  • Manufacturer/Model
    Bruce ... somewhere in his 40's
    CPU
    Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU
    Motherboard
    INTEL/D975XBX2
    Memory
    4 GB
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 2600 Pro
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung SyncMaster 914v
    Screen Resolution
    1280 x 1024
    Hard Drives
    2/500GB each ... ST3500630AS ATA Device.
    One is not connected
    PSU
    Rocketfish 700 W
    Case
    G.Skill Gigabyte Chassis
    Mouse
    Microsoft PS/2 Mouse
    Keyboard
    Standard PS/2 Keyboard
    Internet Speed
    DSL
    Other Info
    ATI HDMI Audio
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