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Make Internet Explorer 64-bit the default?

leemoreau

New Member
Messages
1
#1
Hey everyone. On my start menu I have Internet Explorer, then Internet Explorer 64-bit. If I launch IE by using the default browser, where you click start and the top option is Internet, it runs the 32 bit version. If I click Start, all programs, then I can do the 64 bit version. How can I make it so the 64 bit is the default?
 

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Messages
228
#3
Don't do it. Very few places can recognize the 64 bit version of Explorer INCLUDING Microsoft itself. If you reply to an email from their technical support it will bounce back as undeliverable, reason: cannot read 64 bit IE. Also, most if not all the current plug ins are not in a 64 bit version.
 

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straw

New Member
Messages
4
#4
hi! just wanna ask how i can bring back my internet explorer 64-bit icon coz i accidentally delete it even in recycle bin.thanks.hope you can help me for this.
 

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mansrm81

Vista Guru
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#5
Check the internet explorer folder in your program files.
 

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straw

New Member
Messages
4
#6
i checked it out already but still i cant find it.this is what happened i just drag the icon from the start menu then put it on the desktop then i erased it even in recycle bin.is there any possible solution to restore it?thanks again.
 

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straw

New Member
Messages
4
#7
is there someone who can do a favor for me?pls try to look on the file location where the IE64-bit is located.thank you so much!
 
Last edited:

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Messages
57
Location
Richmond, VA
#10
Don't use the 64bit version as alot of "stuff" on the web namely Flash won't work on websites...they are working on a 64 bit version as we speak. Best to stay with 32 bit version so you don't run into any issues. And like other guys said MS's own website doesn't load properly under 64 bit version LOL.
 

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klettke

New Member
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1
#11
[Background: 32-bit IE found at C:\Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe. 64-bit IE found at C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe.]
STEP 1
Navigate to C:\Program Files (x86). Hightlight the "Internet Explorer" folder and rename (right-click...Rename) it to "Internet Explorer 32".
[Philosophy: Try to avoid actually deleting system files. Make it simple to return to if needed.]
STEP 2
Navigate to C:\Program Files. Note the "Internet Explorer" folder. Copy it to C:\Program Files (x86) by your preferred method. E.g., drag and drop is one way, or right-click on it, select Copy, navigate to C:\Program Files (x86) and Paste is another.
[Comments: a. You can choose a different folder name for the rename in Step 1. I just like to be obvious.
b. You can check after the rename of Step 1 by clicking on a link if you've put Favorites in your Start Menu--you should get an error message and the program won't launch.
c. Why not just rename the iexplore.exe instead of the whole folder? Because I'm dumb enough not to know for certain whether any of the subroutines (.dll files and the like) in the 64-bit folder might also be optimized for 64-bit operation. This way, I think I've covered it all.]
dwightklettke@juno.com
 

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sickle

New Member
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2
#12
It takes so long to make everything 64 bits. 3/4 of the running processes are not 64 bits and I was trying to fix it (find a 64 bit version for each). After reading this topic, I'm discouraged to learn that Internet Explorer 64 bits is not functional. Neither Firefox, nor Chrome seams to have a 64 bits version for Windows 7. I tried Firefox Nightly and it installed a 32 bits version ! And worst, the drivers are not 64 bits.

For the 128 bits CPU generation, I hope Intel and AMD will not make it 8-16-32-64 bits compatible, like was the first idea of Intel. As for 16 bits, it will take another 15 to 20 years to get everything 64 bits. :cry:
 

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townsbg

~~тσωηsвg~~
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#13
The advantage to a 64-bit processor isn't just 64-bit programs but mainly it is in the way that the processor handles the load placed on it. In addition there is more room for memory. With a 32-bit OS you can only use 4 gb and quite frequently lately there is much more especially in servers. With a 64 bit processor and OS a system can in theory handle 16 exabytes. That's 16 billion gigabytes.

I hope Intel and AMD will not make it 8-16-32-64 bits compatible
As for this if it wasn't for backwards compatibility in using your example when you get a 128 bit processor you'd have to get a 128 bit OS and 128 bit programs. In the real world it isn't practical to have that big of a computing shift without backwards compatibility. It may not seem like a big deal for you to have to upgrade your system but for large businesses that have hundreds of servers and thousands of workstations, laptops, tablets, etc. it would cost millions to billions to upgrade their infrastructure. In addition the companies' custom built applications would be useless until rewritten. Also there is the cost of replacing the hardware. I don't know much about programming but ask any programmer and I'd be willing to bet that it is a big deal to reformat existing programs. That's why we are still using a lot of 32 bit programs but more applications are built for 64 bit processors than you know about. Anyone working in a server services field like myself would tell you that it is a very complicated world back behind the scenes. In reality without backwards compatibility a 128 bit processor would be useless until everything is re-written to use it. Same thing for 64-bit. Currently due the to memory restriction on a 32-bit platform it is rare to find a server with a 32-bit OS. Such systems would be almost useless without backwards compatibility.
 

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sickle

New Member
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2
#14
With a 32-bit OS you can only use 4 gb ... Currently due the to memory restriction on a 32-bit platform it is rare to find a server with a 32-bit OS.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_Address_Extension

In the real world it isn't practical to have that big of a computing shift without backwards compatibility
We do not need backward compatibility to get processing power.

In addition the companies' custom built applications would be useless until rewritten ... it is a big deal to reformat existing programs
Depends. More and more languages are interpreted instead of compiled in assembler. They make use of an engine. So the migration is transparent. As for C/C++, the migration is often to use 128 bits APIs version of the OS and review the pointers.

Also there is the cost of replacing the hardware
They will not have to upgrade every workstations and servers to 128 bits.

In reality without backwards compatibility a 128 bit processor would be useless until everything is re-written to use it.
Right, as I see now. As for 64 bits, it will take too many time to companies to make the decision to build a 128 bits version of their products. So you will get a new computer, but no application available.
 

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townsbg

~~тσωηsвg~~
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#15
We do not need backward compatibility to get processing power.
Going along with your example you would before a 32/64 bit bit OS and program would be able to use it.

Right, as I see now. As for 64 bits, it will take too many time to companies to make the decision to build a 128 bits version of their products. So you will get a new computer, but no application available.
My point exactly.
 

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