Solved Vista To Windows 10 File Transferring

I have a new desktop on the way with Windows 10 Professional. My current PC (desktop) I've had since 2008 which has Windows Vista Home Premium 32-bit. I've never connected two computers together via LAN cable to created a network, but I would like to do that in order to transfer files.

Also, I currently have only one monitor, which is only a year old, and I will be connecting it to the new tower, but I'm assuming that if I connect my current PC to my new one, I will only need the one monitor since I will be able to see what's in my old PC (this one) with it?

I was doing some research by viewing several tutorial videos on YouTube regarding networking computers together and transferring files, and some of them seem to be a little confusing, however I found this video, which shows how to use software to easily transfer files, once the two computers are connected: Transfer Files From PC to PC Without External Storage - YouTube

Is this a good way to go in order for me to accomplish this, or should I just use the Windows file sharing capabilities to actually transfer the files? Also, can someone direct me to the most clear step-by-step directions to network two computers together via LAN cable? I've watched several videos, and some are different than others, so I thought I'd ask on the forum here to get the best directions. Thank you.

~FGN
 

My Computer

Barman58

Staff member
Vista Guru
Gold Member
Transferring files and sharing monitors are completely different things.

It may be possible to used two different monitor inputs, (if available), connecting each, via a suitable lead to each of the computers and switching the inputs manually on the monitor to show each of the computers outputs.

I would actually suggest you go a different route, using the Vista system as a "headless" unit (no Monitor directly attached), and using software to display the new and the old outputs on the monitor connected to the new system (controlled from the new system).

You will need to connect both of your systems to a router, (should already be in place for internet connection), and set up a "private" network between your systems.

You can then simply see the shared folders on the Vista system from the new system and use copy and paste or even drag and drop to move files between them.

To actually use the old system from the new you can use windows built in remote control software but as you are dealing with versions of windows several generations apart i would suggest that you look at Team viewer which is much more powerfull yet easier to use - teamviewer is free for private use so is an ideal solution if set up correctly for unattended control and with modern network speeds is just like using a standard monitor. The other advantage of this setup is that the old system does not need a keyboard or mouse attached, just power and a network connection, so can be placed out of site though still usable

TeamViewer – Remote Support, Remote Access, Service Desk, Online Collaboration and Meetings
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD FX8350 Vishera 8 Core @4GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus M5A78L-M USB3
    Memory
    32GB [4x8GB] DDR3 1600 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus nVidia GTX750TI-OC-2GD5 (2GB DDR5)
    Sound Card
    ASUS Xoner DG + SPDIF to 5.1 System + HDMI
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer G276HL 27", (DVi) + Samsung 39" HDTV (HDMI)
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 1920x1080 @50Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal
    Crucial CT256MX100SSD1 256GB SSD,
    WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB,
    Toshiba HDWD130 3TB
    Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB,

    External (USB3)
    Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    PSU
    Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
    Case
    AeroCool X-Warrior Red Devil Tower
    Cooling
    Hyper103 CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
    Mouse
    Wireless Logitec - MX Master + M570 Trackball
    Keyboard
    Wireless Logitec MK710 + K400+
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
    Other Info
    Six Sensor Auto / Manual Digital cooling (Fan) control with Touch control Panel
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 32" TV
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)AMDAMD

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
Hello Nigel,

Thank you for your detailed instructions. The problem is that I don't have an Internet router that I use, just one modem from Comcast that my Vista desktop machine is hooked up to via enthernet cable directly. If I have to, I will buy a second used smaller monitor to hook up to my old (Vista) machine, and maybe that will make it easier, thus going a different route with this. With two machines with working monitors on each, I've seen YouTube tutorials with two computers connected via LAN cables directly to one another. If I go this way, what would you suggest? Thanks again.

~FGN
 

My Computer

Barman58

Staff member
Vista Guru
Gold Member
You would need a specialist cable to make a direct connection between the two computers - something like this Amazon.com: Belkin CAT5E Crossover Cable 10 feet-Red: MP3 Downloads - you would need to disconnect the old computer from the internet and use this cable to connect the two computers to each other temporarily whilst transferring

Alternatively a simple Ethernet switch and a couple of additional standard Ethernet cables would allow you to connect the two machines to each other and the internet something like this would allow you to do this and even provide a further two connections for future use, (Visiting family Etc) -

Amazon.com: TP-Link 5-Port Fast Ethernet Desktop Switch (TL-SF1005D): Computers & Accessories
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD FX8350 Vishera 8 Core @4GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus M5A78L-M USB3
    Memory
    32GB [4x8GB] DDR3 1600 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus nVidia GTX750TI-OC-2GD5 (2GB DDR5)
    Sound Card
    ASUS Xoner DG + SPDIF to 5.1 System + HDMI
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer G276HL 27", (DVi) + Samsung 39" HDTV (HDMI)
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 1920x1080 @50Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal
    Crucial CT256MX100SSD1 256GB SSD,
    WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB,
    Toshiba HDWD130 3TB
    Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB,

    External (USB3)
    Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    PSU
    Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
    Case
    AeroCool X-Warrior Red Devil Tower
    Cooling
    Hyper103 CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
    Mouse
    Wireless Logitec - MX Master + M570 Trackball
    Keyboard
    Wireless Logitec MK710 + K400+
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
    Other Info
    Six Sensor Auto / Manual Digital cooling (Fan) control with Touch control Panel
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 32" TV
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)AMDAMD

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
Hello Nigel,

Ok, I really appreciate this input. So you're saying that this special cable (Belkin CAT5E Crossover Cable) is not exactly the same as a standard ethernet cable? I ask, because of course, I already have an ethernet cable, and could just use that. If it's not exactly the same, I'll order this one you gave me on Amazon. The male plug-in ends of it look exactly the same, which I would assume they would HAVE to be in order to plug into those same ports (the only ports available for such cable ends). And is a 'LAN' cable the same as the Belkin one, or is that the same thing as an ethernet? Thanks again.

~FGN
 

My Computer

Barman58

Staff member
Vista Guru
Gold Member
A crossover cable uses the exact same cable and plugs, but they are connected differently - two of the wires TX & RX are swapped over at one end, ( normal cable all wires are straight connected).

Another option in your case would be to use adaptors with your existing cable

A quick search on Amazon.com for crossover cable showed a number of options including the adaptor Of course you only need a cable long enough to use for the actual transfer so a shorter one that the 10 foot I suggested would be acceptable and cheaper

Amazon.com: crossover cable: Electronics
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD FX8350 Vishera 8 Core @4GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus M5A78L-M USB3
    Memory
    32GB [4x8GB] DDR3 1600 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus nVidia GTX750TI-OC-2GD5 (2GB DDR5)
    Sound Card
    ASUS Xoner DG + SPDIF to 5.1 System + HDMI
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer G276HL 27", (DVi) + Samsung 39" HDTV (HDMI)
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 1920x1080 @50Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal
    Crucial CT256MX100SSD1 256GB SSD,
    WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB,
    Toshiba HDWD130 3TB
    Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB,

    External (USB3)
    Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    PSU
    Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
    Case
    AeroCool X-Warrior Red Devil Tower
    Cooling
    Hyper103 CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
    Mouse
    Wireless Logitec - MX Master + M570 Trackball
    Keyboard
    Wireless Logitec MK710 + K400+
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
    Other Info
    Six Sensor Auto / Manual Digital cooling (Fan) control with Touch control Panel
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 32" TV
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)AMDAMD

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
Hello Nigel,

Ok, that's very interesting about the way the cables connect differently, and answers my question clearly. I will be purchasing a crossover cable then (don't feel like messing with adapters with my existing cable).

I just purchased a separate monitor on eBay, so that will be here in a couple of days. Thanks for all of your help, and during the process of networking the two computers together, if I need any help, I'll ask, but hopefully I'll be fine with the tutorials I've saved for future reference.

~FGN
 

My Computer

Barman58

Staff member
Vista Guru
Gold Member
When/if you need any help with Windows 10 we have a sister site at tenforums.com with a full set of tutorials. You will need to register again but should be able to use the same details (free as always)

Sent from my D6603 using Tapatalk
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD FX8350 Vishera 8 Core @4GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus M5A78L-M USB3
    Memory
    32GB [4x8GB] DDR3 1600 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus nVidia GTX750TI-OC-2GD5 (2GB DDR5)
    Sound Card
    ASUS Xoner DG + SPDIF to 5.1 System + HDMI
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer G276HL 27", (DVi) + Samsung 39" HDTV (HDMI)
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 1920x1080 @50Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal
    Crucial CT256MX100SSD1 256GB SSD,
    WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB,
    Toshiba HDWD130 3TB
    Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB,

    External (USB3)
    Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    PSU
    Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
    Case
    AeroCool X-Warrior Red Devil Tower
    Cooling
    Hyper103 CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
    Mouse
    Wireless Logitec - MX Master + M570 Trackball
    Keyboard
    Wireless Logitec MK710 + K400+
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
    Other Info
    Six Sensor Auto / Manual Digital cooling (Fan) control with Touch control Panel
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 32" TV
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)AMDAMD

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up

townsbg

~~тσωηsвg~~
Vista Guru
Gold Member
The heads of a regular cable and a crossover cable may be the same but there are actually 2 different ways that the wires can be arranged in the head. A regular cable uses one or the other but a crossover cable uses one on each end which results in wires being crossed over. Due to the way ethernet works devices of the same type must use a crossover cable be it 2 computers or 2 switches. Regular cables can be used for different types such as a computer to a switch or router. This crossover essentially happens within a switch or router which is why when connecting 2 computers together you need a crossover cable. Here are a couple of articles I found explaining it. There may be others that are easier to understand if you google it.

When to Use a Crossover Cable - PacketU
Ethernet crossover cable - Wikipedia

A picture of the ends of a crossover cable on the wikipedia page show that the wires are not lined up the same. I haven't tried to connect 2 computers like that myself but I bet that you will need to manually configure the ipaddresses on each computer and if you don't know what you are doing it won't work. Therefore it would be simpler to involve your router. It isn't as simple as plugging the cable in on each device. They need to be networked together for the connection to be meaningful. Most home routers configure ipaddresses automatically but by bypassing the router you lose that. If it where me I would just use a router.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 7 Pro x64
    Manufacturer/Model
    Mid 2010 iMac
    CPU
    Quad core 3.2 Ghz Intel I3
    Memory
    8 gb
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 5670 512 mb ram
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 and 1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB
    Other Info
    N/A
  • Operating System
    Windows 2008 R2 Enterprise
    Manufacturer/Model
    Compaq Presario SR5350F
    CPU
    Pentium 2.0 gHZ Dual core E2160
    Memory
    2 gb
    Screen Resolution
    1440 x 900
    Hard Drives
    300 GB
Hello Townsbg,

Thanks for the information on the cables. I also really appreciate that input about networking, and will consider what you said, and if I have a problem trying to configure the IP's, I'll look into involving a router to do it automatically.
 

My Computer

virtual6

Vista Pro
Are you going through this exercise for a learning experience?
Is there a reason to not use a storage device to transfer the files?
What are your plans for the old computer?
Typically I remove the old hard drive before disposing of an old computer.
I put the old drive into a drive enclosure and copy the files from there.
An alternative is to run a backup program for the old system, and files can be transferred from the backup copy.
 

My Computer

townsbg

~~тσωηsвg~~
Vista Guru
Gold Member
You have to have a fairly decent understanding of networking to get it to work but perhaps there is a tutorial on the net. A router would be easier. A USB drive or enclosure would be even easier.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 7 Pro x64
    Manufacturer/Model
    Mid 2010 iMac
    CPU
    Quad core 3.2 Ghz Intel I3
    Memory
    8 gb
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 5670 512 mb ram
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 and 1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB
    Other Info
    N/A
  • Operating System
    Windows 2008 R2 Enterprise
    Manufacturer/Model
    Compaq Presario SR5350F
    CPU
    Pentium 2.0 gHZ Dual core E2160
    Memory
    2 gb
    Screen Resolution
    1440 x 900
    Hard Drives
    300 GB
You have to have a fairly decent understanding of networking to get it to work but perhaps there is a tutorial on the net. A router would be easier. A USB drive or enclosure would be even easier.
I am looking to all the tutorials right now. The thing that is not explained in many of them is how they come up with the I.P. addresses they use during the process. I was just watching one on YT where the tech says, as he types it into the designated fields, "The I.P. address I choose is 192...." I then said to myself, well explain WHY and HOW you came up with that particular I.P. address to use. He's making it seem as though you can just choose any I.P. address you want out of thin air. I'll probably just go ahead and get a router to do it.

When you say a USB drive, are you referring to an external hard drive? And I've never used a hard drive enclosure. How exactly would that work. You basically just unplug your current tower's hard drive, put/plug it inside the enclosure, and use it like an external hard drive to your new computer? I was just looking at some on Amazon. Would this be a standard one to use for my purposes? http://a.co/eXYmfk3.
 
Last edited:

My Computer

Barman58

Staff member
Vista Guru
Gold Member
The ranges of IP addresses available for different purposes are set by international standards agencies.

Basically there are three ranges of addresses that are designed to only operate on a local level - ie, on a home or buisiness network, these are known as private networks - if data that is heading to one of these private network addressees gets loose and onto the internet the hardware there will block it, which prevents problems. There are millions of private networks worldwide many of which have the same ranges in use - Indeed the default for 90% + of home routers is 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.1.255 with the router taking 192.168.1.1 the system prevents clashes and related problems.

here's the Wiki Page with more info ...
Private network - Wikipedia
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD FX8350 Vishera 8 Core @4GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus M5A78L-M USB3
    Memory
    32GB [4x8GB] DDR3 1600 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus nVidia GTX750TI-OC-2GD5 (2GB DDR5)
    Sound Card
    ASUS Xoner DG + SPDIF to 5.1 System + HDMI
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer G276HL 27", (DVi) + Samsung 39" HDTV (HDMI)
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 1920x1080 @50Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal
    Crucial CT256MX100SSD1 256GB SSD,
    WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB,
    Toshiba HDWD130 3TB
    Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB,

    External (USB3)
    Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    PSU
    Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
    Case
    AeroCool X-Warrior Red Devil Tower
    Cooling
    Hyper103 CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
    Mouse
    Wireless Logitec - MX Master + M570 Trackball
    Keyboard
    Wireless Logitec MK710 + K400+
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
    Other Info
    Six Sensor Auto / Manual Digital cooling (Fan) control with Touch control Panel
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 32" TV
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)AMDAMD

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
Are you going through this exercise for a learning experience?
Is there a reason to not use a storage device to transfer the files?
What are your plans for the old computer?
Typically I remove the old hard drive before disposing of an old computer.
I put the old drive into a drive enclosure and copy the files from there.
An alternative is to run a backup program for the old system, and files can be transferred from the backup copy.
Thank you for your input, I'm open to other options. I might go the hard drive enclosure route. And I'm just going to keep my old computer for a back-up for now.
 

My Computer

The ranges of IP addresses available for different purposes are set by international standards agencies.

Basically there are three ranges of addresses that are designed to only operate on a local level - ie, on a home or buisiness network, these are known as private networks - if data that is heading to one of these private network addressees gets loose and onto the internet the hardware there will block it, which prevents problems. There are millions of private networks worldwide many of which have the same ranges in use - Indeed the default for 90% + of home routers is 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.1.255 with the router taking 192.168.1.1 the system prevents clashes and related problems.

here's the Wiki Page with more info ...
Private network - Wikipedia
Thank you, Nigel. The Wiki page is helpful. So what happens, by chance, when you choose an IP address within that range that is already in use?
 

My Computer

Barman58

Staff member
Vista Guru
Gold Member
If you are talking about the range, then you can choose any range that fits into one of the allowed ranges. It does not matter if every household in the street, (or town), choose the same range, because of the way things are set up they will never interfere.

If you are talking about assigning IP addresses to individual computers within a local segment, (LAN), if you allocate the same number to two or more devices these will clash and fail to work, all addresses used on a segment must be unique, so it is best to make a note of the addresses you allocate

If you are using a router you can set this to allocate numbers for you using DHCP, (Dynamic Host Control Protocol), where you set the device settings to automatic and the router assigns each device a unique number, (this system allocates on a first come first serve basis and also withdraws addresses if they are not used, so over time a single device can have a range of addresses but only one at a specific time). You can also fix some devices to a specific address which is useful for network printers and such
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD FX8350 Vishera 8 Core @4GHz
    Motherboard
    Asus M5A78L-M USB3
    Memory
    32GB [4x8GB] DDR3 1600 MHz
    Graphics Card(s)
    Asus nVidia GTX750TI-OC-2GD5 (2GB DDR5)
    Sound Card
    ASUS Xoner DG + SPDIF to 5.1 System + HDMI
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Acer G276HL 27", (DVi) + Samsung 39" HDTV (HDMI)
    Screen Resolution
    2 x 1920x1080 @50Hz
    Hard Drives
    Internal
    Crucial CT256MX100SSD1 256GB SSD,
    WDC WD30EZRX-00D8PB0 3TB,
    Toshiba HDWD130 3TB
    Seagate ST2000DM001-1CH1 2TB,

    External (USB3)
    Seagate Backup+ Hub BK SCSI Disk 8TB
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    PSU
    Aerocool Templarius Imperator 750W 80+ Silver
    Case
    AeroCool X-Warrior Red Devil Tower
    Cooling
    Hyper103 CPU, Rear 120mm, Front 2x120mm, Side 2x120mm
    Mouse
    Wireless Logitec - MX Master + M570 Trackball
    Keyboard
    Wireless Logitec MK710 + K400+
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up
    Other Info
    Six Sensor Auto / Manual Digital cooling (Fan) control with Touch control Panel
  • Operating System
    Windows 10 Pro 1709 Fall Creators Update (16299.192)
    Manufacturer/Model
    Real World Computers (Custom by Me)
    CPU
    AMD
    Monitor(s) Displays
    Samsung 32" TV
    Screen Resolution
    1920 x 1080
    Hard Drives
    2.5/3.5 Hot Swap Cradle, USB3 + eSata (client HDDs)AMDAMD

    NAS 4TB +1TB
    Internet Speed
    37.8 MB Down 9.5 MB Up

virtual6

Vista Pro
When you say a USB drive, are you referring to an external hard drive? And I've never used a hard drive enclosure. How exactly would that work. You basically just unplug your current tower's hard drive, put/plug it inside the enclosure, and use it like an external hard drive to your new computer? I was just looking at some on Amazon. Would this be a standard one to use for my purposes? http://a.co/eXYmfk3.
When townsbg said "USB drive", yes that could be an external hard drive. It could also refer to the very popular and convenient so-called flash drive (or key drive, thumb drive, etc.)...the modern replacement for the floppy disk.
You are correct about how to use the hard drive enclosure. But you need to know the specifics of your drive in order to select the correct enclosure. The one you linked may or may not work, it's for a 2.5 inch drive, but your tower may have a 3.5 inch drive. Since you're just going to keep the old computer around for a while, I wouldn't recommend to try to remove the old drive, buy an enclosure, etc.
Instead just get an external USB drive like mentioned above, easily available at local big box and office supply stores.
Plus you can use it for system backups, extra storage, etc. The flash drive capacity of course is quite a bit less than a hard drive, but might be enough for file transfers.
 

My Computer

townsbg

~~тσωηsвg~~
Vista Guru
Gold Member
I am looking to all the tutorials right now. The thing that is not explained in many of them is how they come up with the I.P. addresses they use during the process. I was just watching one on YT where the tech says, as he types it into the designated fields, "The I.P. address I choose is 192...." I then said to myself, well explain WHY and HOW you came up with that particular I.P. address to use. He's making it seem as though you can just choose any I.P. address you want out of thin air. I'll probably just go ahead and get a router to do it.
That is somewhat true however there are limitations as to what numbers you can use or should use. You have to have a good networking background to know what numbers to choose. Using a router that automatically assigns ip addresses would be simpler.

When you say a USB drive, are you referring to an external hard drive? And I've never used a hard drive enclosure. How exactly would that work. You basically just unplug your current tower's hard drive, put/plug it inside the enclosure, and use it like an external hard drive to your new computer? I was just looking at some on Amazon. Would this be a standard one to use for my purposes? http://a.co/eXYmfk3.
That link is the general idea for a hard drive enclosure but that specific model is for a 2.5" hard drive which are usually found in laptops. You would likely need one a 3.5" for drives which are found in a desktop.
 

My Computers

System One System Two

  • Operating System
    Windows 7 Pro x64
    Manufacturer/Model
    Mid 2010 iMac
    CPU
    Quad core 3.2 Ghz Intel I3
    Memory
    8 gb
    Graphics Card(s)
    ATI Radeon HD 5670 512 mb ram
    Screen Resolution
    1920x1080 and 1440x900
    Hard Drives
    1 TB
    Other Info
    N/A
  • Operating System
    Windows 2008 R2 Enterprise
    Manufacturer/Model
    Compaq Presario SR5350F
    CPU
    Pentium 2.0 gHZ Dual core E2160
    Memory
    2 gb
    Screen Resolution
    1440 x 900
    Hard Drives
    300 GB
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