Shortcut Target Path Location

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ByLine
How to Change the Target Path Location of a Shortcut in Vista
Synopsis
This will show you how to change the Target path location of a shortcut file or folder. The Target is the full path of the original file or folder the shortcut opens.
How to Change the Target Path Location of a Shortcut in Vista

information   Information
This will show you how to change the Target path location of a shortcut file or folder. The Target is the full path of the original file or folder, usually an EXE file, the shortcut opens.
Note   Note
When the original file that the shortcut was created for is moved, this can cause the shortcut to lose it's association and no longer open the original file. The shortcut no longer has the correct full path to the original file. You can correct this by changing the target for the shortcut to the new location of the original file.
Tip   Tip
If this fails or you are unable to change the Target, then you can create a new shortcut by right clicking on the original file amd click Create Shortcut. You may need to allow it to place the shortcut on your desktop instead. If this happens, just Move it to where you like after it is created.




Here's How:
1. Right click on the shortcut and click on Properties.​
2. Click on the Shortcut tab. (See screenshot below)​
3. In the Target field, type the full path of the original file for this shortcut.​
4. Click on OK to apply.​
Shortcut_Properties.jpg

That's it,
Shawn


 

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You could use OPTION ONE to only have to press and hold Shift + right click to see the "Open Command Window Here" instead though. ;)

That option only works for directories, not shortcuts (and probably not regular files) in my version of Windows (Vista Ultimate x64). (Why oh, why do they restrict these things with so many different rules and versions and stuff?). But it doesn't matter, I opened the command window and navigated to the correct directory using CD; I'm an old DOS hand - I know how to change directories.

But now that I'm in the right directory, I don't know how to find out where that shortcut points to, and what it's options are. What do I do now that I'm in the right location in the command window?
 
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Brink

Staff member
mvp
To be honest, I don't think that there is much you can do there. I suppose that you could try and copy the SASV9.CFG file to the location that it is looking for it at to see if that helps.
 
To be honest, I don't think that there is much you can do there. I suppose that you could try and copy the SASV9.CFG file to the location that it is looking for it at to see if that helps.

That worked. I don't know why I didn't just think of that earlier. Part of the problem was I expected Windows to resist when I tried to create directories in Program Files (in the past, it's messed with the file attributes and other stuff that I really can't understand).

Anyway, the only question left is my rhetorical one: Why does Windows do this? Why can't it just let us see the details of the shortcut?

Thanks,
-J
 

Brink

Staff member
mvp
It wouldn't be a issue with Windows, but with the program and how it installed instead unless something was changed by mistake.

I'm happy to hear that you got it sorted though. :)
 
It wouldn't be a issue with Windows, but with the program and how it installed instead unless something was changed by mistake.

I'm happy to hear that you got it sorted though. :)

I fully concede SAS' guilt in this issue. But I have no choice about using SAS - it is assigned and given out by my professor. And this is hardly the only thing about Windows which is frustrating (for example, why won't it remember how I want to view directories in explorer even though I tell it to - that's a whole different thread). Just because SAS makes an inconfigurable program is not an excuse for Windows to make a program which is controlling and difficult to use. It is my PC, with my OS, and my application program; there is no good excuse for Windows to hide the details of my shortcut from me nor to make it so difficult to accomplish what should be a simple, 30 second task. Bot parties are guilty of writing bad, controlling software which makes me adapt to them - but this is a forum about Windows. I will not likely withhold my opinion of SAS on their forum, either (a great example of how to win friends and influence tech support :D).

Just one stupid user's opinion.

I do appreciate your help. My frustration is with using Windows, not you.
Thank you,
-StupidUser
 

Robster

New Member
The question I have is what to do when the shortcut tab is missing from the properties?!

All of my MS word shortcuts stopped working last week, and I can't fix them because it doesn't give me the 'find target' option when I right click and look at the shortcut's properties. Please help!
 

wguru

As requested
No real answer for your sit, have you tried opening a Windows browser window and rather than using it's 'highlight' and clicking 'open', instead right click any of your given shortcuts, try selecting properties and see if the tab's still missing? Just a thought.
 
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Brink

Staff member
mvp
Hello Robster, and welcome to Vista Forums.

Word or Office shortcuts do not allow you to modify the default shortcuts.

You could create new shortcuts directly from the EXE files in the Word folder in C:\Programs Files, or see if reinstalling Word may help.

Hope this helps,
Shawn
 
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