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Vista Booting Issue BSOD

#1
Hi all,

I was wondering whether you could help, basically I have a 4TB SSHD installed which I have formatted as GPT and have allocated the following Windows OSs to the following partitions in ascending order: Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 x64 (Partition 3), Windows 7 Ultimate x64 (Partition 4), Windows 7 Professional SP1 x64 (Partition 5), Windows 8 Pro x64 (Partition 6), Windows 8.1 Pro x64 (Partition 7) and Windows 10 Pro x64 (Partition 8). When installing Vista using the partition wizard, I created each partition with 120GB of space apart from Partition 8 which I allocated 1.5TB, Partition 1 (System Reserved) and Partition 2 (ESR) were automatically created when creating a partition for Vista, the remainder of disk space I have left as unallocated for the future just in case I want to create new or expand existing partitions. However the problem I have got when booting into Vista, it comes up with a BSOD error code *** STOP: 0x0000001E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005,0xFFFFF80003ACC7,0x0000000000000000,0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF) that I cannot fix even after reinstalling the OS which was now changed the bootloader from Windows 10 to Windows Vista but Windows 10 is the default OS that the PC boots to. Is there anyway to rectify this issue? Your help would be much appreciated.

Kind regards,

RocknRollTim
 

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#2
Update

Also temporarily removed the boot entries for Windows 10, 8.1 and 8 using EasyBCD which didn't work and would have expected to work.

[FONT=&quot]P.S. I found this link [/FONT]Repair Dual-boot (Multi-boot) Configuration: Guide for Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, 10[FONT=&quot] whilst I was on the Internet which unfortunately is for MBR, however the other thing I have noticed when logging in to each Windows OS is that the drive letters in Windows Explorer change slightly each time, this should have nothing to do with it surely?[/FONT]
 
Last edited:

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richc46

Vista Guru
Gold Member
Fairfield County, CT

Posts
20,105
#3
Try running a memory test. Run the test for at least 8 passes. You may have a memory problem
RAM - Test with Memtest86+ - Windows 7 Help Forums

If memory test comes up negative, try updating
[FONT=&amp]The chipset, video card, display and network adapter drivers to the latest by visiting the computer manufacturer’s website.
[/FONT]
You could also try to update using device manager, but that is not quite as up to date as the websites.

Finally, if all else fails try the driver verifier for faulty drivers
Driver Verifier - Enable and Disable - Windows 7 Help Forums
 

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#4
After you first installed Vista, and before any other OS installs, did you successfully boot the system?
If I were doing this setup, I think I would have made sure every system booted after each new install.

Does your setup work if you remove Vista entirely?

Maybe you could try Safe Mode to begin to narrow the problem.

As you said, the drive letter assignments aren't part of the boot problem. If you installed each system by booting from the installation media, then your files will be the C: drive. If you installed a system from within a different running system, then your files may be some other drive letter.

Aside from the boot issue, you are trying to install 10 years worth of operating systems on one machine, does Vista, in particular, have the drivers for your hardware (audio, video)?
 

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#5
Try running a memory test. Run the test for at least 8 passes. You may have a memory problem
RAM - Test with Memtest86+ - Windows 7 Help Forums

If memory test comes up negative, try updating
[FONT=&amp]The chipset, video card, display and network adapter drivers to the latest by visiting the computer manufacturer’s website.
[/FONT]
You could also try to update using device manager, but that is not quite as up to date as the websites.

Finally, if all else fails try the driver verifier for faulty drivers
Driver Verifier - Enable and Disable - Windows 7 Help Forums
Hi richc46,

Thank you for getting back to me, I will try your suggestions when I have a moment, I'm currently in the process of getting rid of GRUB2 which is fun and is preventing the Windows Boot Manager from appearing and have to go through GRUB2 to get to the Windows Boot Manager. I thought that installing Ubuntu alongside the Windows OSs would rectify the BSOD issue when booting into Vista but obviously not in the order I installed it in as well as configuring the partition styles for each partition.

Regards,

RocknRollTim
 

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#6
After you first installed Vista, and before any other OS installs, did you successfully boot the system?
If I were doing this setup, I think I would have made sure every system booted after each new install.

Does your setup work if you remove Vista entirely?

Maybe you could try Safe Mode to begin to narrow the problem.

As you said, the drive letter assignments aren't part of the boot problem. If you installed each system by booting from the installation media, then your files will be the C: drive. If you installed a system from within a different running system, then your files may be some other drive letter.

Aside from the boot issue, you are trying to install 10 years worth of operating systems on one machine, does Vista, in particular, have the drivers for your hardware (audio, video)?
Hi virtual6,

Thank you for getting back to me, Vista did successfully boot after I first installed it before installing the other OSs. I did test after each OS was installed in order from oldest to newest on each seperate partition and found that after I installed Windows 8, Vista comes up with the BSOD when booting into it.

Vista still doesn't work after a reinstall, not unless I remove Windows 8, 8.1 and 10 from the PC which I don't want to do.

Drive C comes up as the default primary drive when booting into each OS as expected.

There are officially no drivers for my PC to run on Vista, in fact the earliest I can find are for Windows 7, surely this can't be preventing Vista from booting?

Kind regards,

RocknRollTim
 

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#7
Update

Installed Ubuntu using some of the instructions from the following link http://askubuntu.com/questions/34326.../343352#343352, used 32000MB for swap area and 120000MB for Ubuntu primary partition but according to the link I should have chosen logical for the Ubuntu primary partition but may have misinterpreted the instructions though. However the problem I have got now is that the PC boots to the GRUB2 menu instead of the Windows Boot Manager and have to go through the GRUB2 menu, not sure whether I selected the EFI version of GRUB2 though as I selected Ext4 journaling file system for the setup of the Ubuntu primary partition plus Vista still comes up with the same BSOD as before when using the Windows Boot Manager i.e. now the classic bootloader instead of the Metro bootloader.
 

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113
#8
Do you get an immediate BSOD? Or do you get any portion of Windows loading progress bar first?

The fact that the problem started after installing Windows 8 has to be a clue.
Seems like the only thing that should have changed is the BCD entries, and would have been nice to have a before and after list (of course we can say that now, at the time you didn't expect to have to troubleshoot boot problems).
Anyway, do the Vista BCD entries look correct...such as the path to "winload.exe"...does "winload.exe" indeed exist at that location within the Vista partition...is the identifier GUID correct?
If you're getting an immediate blue screen, it's almost as if it can't find the Windows (Vista) boot loader.

Not that you should redo your setup, but I think if I were doing it, I might have used two drives, and grouped Vista and Win 7 together, and 8, 8.1, and 10 together, just because the systems in each group are more closely related to each other. This might have, perhaps by luck, avoided your problem. Of course this depends on how easily your computer can accommodate two drives, tower vs. laptop, etc.
 

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#9
Do you get an immediate BSOD? Or do you get any portion of Windows loading progress bar first?

The fact that the problem started after installing Windows 8 has to be a clue.
Seems like the only thing that should have changed is the BCD entries, and would have been nice to have a before and after list (of course we can say that now, at the time you didn't expect to have to troubleshoot boot problems).
Anyway, do the Vista BCD entries look correct...such as the path to "winload.exe"...does "winload.exe" indeed exist at that location within the Vista partition...is the identifier GUID correct?
If you're getting an immediate blue screen, it's almost as if it can't find the Windows (Vista) boot loader.

Not that you should redo your setup, but I think if I were doing it, I might have used two drives, and grouped Vista and Win 7 together, and 8, 8.1, and 10 together, just because the systems in each group are more closely related to each other. This might have, perhaps by luck, avoided your problem. Of course this depends on how easily your computer can accommodate two drives, tower vs. laptop, etc.
Hi virtual6,

Thanks for getting back to me, I get an immediate BSOD and no loading progress bar appears beforehand.

It's a shame I can't reverse engineer, not unless I boot into Windows 7 Professional SP1 x64, delete the volumes for Windows 8, 8.1 and 10 as well as Ubuntu in Disk Management and clear the BCD entries for Windows 8, 8.1 and 10 using either bcdedit or EasyBCD to see if that works?

Below is an output from EasyBCD with all the BCD entries for each version of Windows including bootloader paths as well as the identifier GUID.

Default: Windows 10
Timeout: 30 seconds
EasyBCD Boot Device: C:\

Entry #1
Name: Windows 10
BCD ID: {current}
Drive: C:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #2
Name: Windows 8.1
BCD ID: {92082802-f65c-11e6-ac21-8040536e4c97}
Drive: H:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #3
Name: Windows 8
BCD ID: {92082801-f65c-11e6-ac21-8040536e4c97}
Drive: G:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #4
Name: Windows 7
BCD ID: {920827e1-f65c-11e6-ac21-8040536e4c97}
Drive: E:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #5
Name: Windows 7
BCD ID: {92082800-f65c-11e6-ac21-8040536e4c97}
Drive: F:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #6
Name: Microsoft Windows Vista
BCD ID: {920827f9-f65c-11e6-ac21-8040536e4c97}
Drive: D:\
Bootloader Path: \windows\system32\winload.efi

Preferably I would like to have all versions of Windows from Vista to 10 on the same drive if possible but another drive can be inserted in the PC though as it has got at least another 2 bays spare.

Regards,

RocknRollTim
 

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Posts
113
#10
Will Vista start in Safe Mode?
Does your blue screen contain any other pertinent info or messages, like "file not found", etc.?
Can you verify that "\windows\system32\winload.efi" exists within the Vista partition?
Do you still get the error if you use a boot manager from, say, Windows 7?
 

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#11
Will Vista start in Safe Mode?
Does your blue screen contain any other pertinent info or messages, like "file not found", etc.?
Can you verify that "\windows\system32\winload.efi" exists within the Vista partition?
Do you still get the error if you use a boot manager from, say, Windows 7?
Hi virtual6,

The BSOD only contains *** STOP: 0x0000001E (0xFFFFFFFFC0000005,0xFFFFF80003ACC7,0x0000000000000000,0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF).

I can verify that "\windows\system32\winload.efi" exists within the Vista partition using Windows Explorer under another version of Windows.

I still get the same error when using the boot manager from Windows 7.

Regards,

RocknRollTim
 

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Posts
113
#12
I was trying to look at the setup for any obvious errors and avoid any dump debugging.
But maybe that's the route you'll have to take.
The Bug Check 0x1E indicates KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED.
The exception code 0xC0000005 indicates STATUS_ACCESS_VIOLATION, a memory access violation occurred.
It is estimated that about three quarters of blue screens are caused by faulting drivers.
Why this problem after installing Windows 8, I have no clue.

That's why I asked if you can boot Vista in Safe Mode, or try some of the Advanced Boot Options, to see if any of those makes a difference.

My other wild guess is to reinstall Vista yet again, but this time use an SP2 source (available from another member on this forum).
 

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#13
I was trying to look at the setup for any obvious errors and avoid any dump debugging.
But maybe that's the route you'll have to take.
The Bug Check 0x1E indicates KMODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED.
The exception code 0xC0000005 indicates STATUS_ACCESS_VIOLATION, a memory access violation occurred.
It is estimated that about three quarters of blue screens are caused by faulting drivers.
Why this problem after installing Windows 8, I have no clue.

That's why I asked if you can boot Vista in Safe Mode, or try some of the Advanced Boot Options, to see if any of those makes a difference.

My other wild guess is to reinstall Vista yet again, but this time use an SP2 source (available from another member on this forum).
Hi virtual6,

Sorry to jump ahead with regards to you suggesting steps to fixing Vista,

I have also tried Safe Mode including a number of the Advanced Boot Options and still results in the BSOD.

Is there a procedure I need to follow in obtaining the SP2 source?

Kind regards,

RocknRollTim
 

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Posts
113
#14
It's probably the longest thread in the forum, under General Discussion.

Vista ISO download

If you ask politely, member Ex_Brit will send you a link which he maintains on a download service.
The file is in "iso" format.
Microsoft created the Vista SP2 iso file but never released it on a DVD media.
To be extra sure of the validity of the file I think I verified it with a checksum I found on the MSDN site...installed just fine.
He will need either your email address via a public forum post (you can disguise it in a way to hide it from bots), or send a private message. I think you need 10 posts to be allowed to send a PM, you're almost there now.
Again, I don't know if it will make any difference with your error...but these files are good to have anyway.
 

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#15
It's probably the longest thread in the forum, under General Discussion.

Vista ISO download

If you ask politely, member Ex_Brit will send you a link which he maintains on a download service.
The file is in "iso" format.
Microsoft created the Vista SP2 iso file but never released it on a DVD media.
To be extra sure of the validity of the file I think I verified it with a checksum I found on the MSDN site...installed just fine.
He will need either your email address via a public forum post (you can disguise it in a way to hide it from bots), or send a private message. I think you need 10 posts to be allowed to send a PM, you're almost there now.
Again, I don't know if it will make any difference with your error...but these files are good to have anyway.
Hi virtual6,

Thank you for getting back to me, will try your last suggestion and to let you know how I get on, thank you for all your help.

Regards,

RocknRollTim

P.S. I was able to send him a request via PM.
 

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wither 3

Vista Guru
Gold Member
Posts
2,299
#17
Does this mean your problem is resolved?
 

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#18
Does this mean your problem is resolved?
Hi virtual6,

Hopefully, the only thing that is standing in my way is understanding the commands in Ubuntu which is fun. From my research this seems like the best route to go down to resolve my issue with Vista rather than going down the EasyRE approach which apparently can be hit and miss and don't really want to pay for a utility that might not work, I'll continually to keep you all posted.

Regards,

RocknRollTim

P.S. I am currently testing an install of Vista Ultimate x64 SP2 to see whether I can get it to boot of a USB stick using UEFI, so far no joy and the same with SP1, I have used Refus to mount the image on the USB stick so far.
 

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Posts
113
#19
this seems like the best route to go down to resolve my issue with Vista
I'm not sure what your plan is...you want to install Linux to be able to use its boot manager? Will that give you greater control over the boot menu and related data? Are you saying you think this is the problem, or do you simply want a better tool in place to help solve the problem?

As far as installing Vista from a USB thumb/flash/key/stick drive, we have a tutorial for that subject:

USB Bootable Vista Installation Flash Thumb Drive

I assume you were able to get the SP2 iso file, why not just burn it to a disc? I've never had an issue installing from a DVD.




 

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#20
I'm not sure what your plan is...you want to install Linux to be able to use its boot manager? Will that give you greater control over the boot menu and related data? Are you saying you think this is the problem, or do you simply want a better tool in place to help solve the problem?

As far as installing Vista from a USB thumb/flash/key/stick drive, we have a tutorial for that subject:

USB Bootable Vista Installation Flash Thumb Drive

I assume you were able to get the SP2 iso file, why not just burn it to a disc? I've never had an issue installing from a DVD.




Hi virtual6,

Sorry for not being clear, my plan is to first install Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 x64, Windows 7 Ultimate x64 and Windows 7 Professional SP1 x64 then I am going to temporarily change the Hex code or GUID from 0700 (Microsoft Basic Data) to 8300 (Linux filesystem) using a Linux Emergency Disk e.g. the Try Ubuntu option can act as a Linux Emergency Disk so that Windows 8 Pro x64, Windows 8.1 Pro x64 and Windows 10 Pro x64 can't see Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 x64, Windows 7 Ultimate x64 and Windows 7 Professional SP1 x64 to prevent conflictions with Windows Vista Ultimate SP1 x64. Next I am going to install Windows 8 Pro x64, Windows 8.1 Pro x64 and Windows 10 Pro x64 then I am going change the Hex code or GUID from 8300 (Linux filesystem) back to 0700 (Microsoft Basic Data), this should overcome the BSOD with Vista in theory.

This method I think will allow you to convert back to Windows Boot Manager except the boot entries may not display as expected i.e. Windows Vista and Window 7 boot entries. Installing Linux isn't required to perform this procedure but may break the underlying security in the file systems of Windows Vista and 7.

Ideally I would have loved to gone for a tool to resolve this issue such as EasyRE but I am not confident that it would resolve the problem hence going for this approach.

I will follow the link you provided to mount Vista on to a flash drive.

Lastly I was able to obtain the SP2 ISO file and will mount it to a DVD if I can't get the ISO to boot as EFI on a flash drive.

Regards,

RocknRollTim

P.S. I updated Windows Vista SP1 to SP2 using the redistributable off the Microsoft website and installed Windows 8 alongside which again broke Vista and don't think the ISO file will fix the problem but will give it a whirl anyway.
 

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