Tutorials

Windows Vista Tutorials, Tricks and Tips.
How to Reset Windows Explorer Folder View Settings to Make Vista Remember Vista sets the Explorer window view settings and folder type template according to what folder types are in the window. This will show you how to reset the Windows Explorer folder view settings, turn off Automatic Folder Type Discovery, and increase the folder view cache to have Vista remember the view settings, folder type template, size, or position of a specific window for when it was last closed at the specific path location. This does not work with the sub Save As, Open With, Open in New Tab (Internet Explorer), etc.... type dialog windows through the File menu bar item though. These do not seem to be able to have their size or position remembered. For these, you can use the free program AutoSizer to resize them. The Windows Explorer window pane Layout settings are universal for all window templates. These are the Search Pane, Details Pane, Preview Pane, and Navigation Pane. They can only be turned on or off for all windows with the same folder template. For example, the Music Details, Music Icons, Pictures and Videos, All Items, Contacts, and Documents. This will have no affect on the memory for the Open, Save, and Save As dialog boxes for having them open to the same location. External devices (EX: USB drive) will not retain their folder view settings when turned off or disconnected from the computer. It has been reported that installing the Vista SP2 has helped resolved this issue of Vista forgetting folder view settings for no apparent reason.The exact cause of Vista losing it's memory on your folder view settings has not been found yet. This may just reset them for now to help Vista remember them again. It has been noticed that changing a lot of window folder view settings in combination with some unknown applications settings may be triggering this forgetfulness. Make sure that you do not have a setting in a 3rd party program set to clear the folder view setting cache when it is used. (EX: CCleaner - Window Size/Location cache option under Cleaner -> Advanced) Normal Way to Reset a Folder Type View Settings This resets the folder view settings for all folders with this same folder template type back to the default view settings. You will need to use METHOD TWO below for Vista not remembering your settings for all the folder views. 1. Open Folder Options from the Control Panel (Classic View), and click on the View tab and Reset Folders button. (See screenshot below) 2. Click on Yes to the confirmation pop-up. 3. Click on OK to close Folder Options. Reset All Folder View Settings to Make Vista Remember This resets all current folder view settings so they will be rebuilt when you restart. This will also bring back the Uninstall, Change, Repair, or Uninstall/Change buttons in Programs and Features if missing. Automatically Using a REG File Download 1. Click on the Download button below to download the Reset_Folder_View.zip file and save it to your desktop.This .reg download includes and does all of the Manual section below for you automatically. https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/reset_folder_view-zip.13562/ 2. Open the ZIP file and extract the Reset_Folder_View.reg file to your desktop. 3. Right click on the downloaded Reset_Folder_View.reg file and click on Merge. 4. Click on Run button in the Security Warning prompt. 5. Click on Continue in the UAC prompt. 6. Click on YES in the Confirmation prompt. 7. Click on OK in the Success prompt. 8. Go to step 29 in OPTION TWO below to finish wrapping this up. Manually Through Registry Editor Reset Folder View Settings : 1. Open the Start Menu. 2. In the white line (Start Search) area, type regedit and press Enter. 3. Click on Continue in the UAC prompt. 4. In regedit, go to: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\Local Settings\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell 5. In the left pane, right click on Bags, and click on Delete. (See screenshot below) A) Click on Yes in the confirmation pop-up window. 6. In the left pane, right click on BagMRU, and click on Delete. (See screenshot below) A) Click on Yes in the confirmation pop-up window. 7. In regedit, go to: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell A) In the left pane, right click on BagMRU and click Delete. (See screenshot below step 8) B) Click on Yes in the confirmation pop-up window. C) In the left pane, right click on Bags and click on Delete. D) Click on Yes in the confirmation pop-up window. 8. In regedit, go to: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\ShellNoRoam A) In the left pane, right click on BagMRU if here and click Delete. (See screenshot below step 8) B) Click on Yes in the confirmation pop-up window. C) In the left pane, right click on Bags if here and click on Delete. D) Click on Yes in the confirmation pop-up window. 9. The registry will now look like this. (See screenshot below) Disable Automatic Folder Type Discovery for Templates : CREDIT TO: Kristan Kenney: Confessions of a Windows EnthusiastThis will allow you to have what folder type template you set for the window instead of Vista automatically assigning a default template to it based on the contents of the window. This is when you have your folder template changed to Pictures and Videos from All Items when you put one image file in the folder. OPTION: This is an optional section, but it is recommended. Steps 1-9 must have been done first before you do this section. If you decide to skip it, then go to step 21. 10. In regedit, go to: (See screenshot below) HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\Local Settings\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell 11. In the left pane, right click on Shell and click on New and Key. 12. Type Bags and press Enter. (See screenshots below) 13. In the left pane, right click on Bags and click New and Key. 14. Type AllFolders and press Enter. (See screenshots below) 15. In the left pane, right click AllFolders and click on New and Key. 16. Type Shell and press Enter. (See screenshots below) 17. In the right pane of Shell, right click on a empty area and click on New and String Value. 18. Type FolderType and press Enter. (See screenshot below) 19. In the right pane, right click on FolderType and click on Modify. 20. Type NotSpecified (or one below) and click on OK. (See screenshots below) You can type any one of these values in bold below instead to apply the template as the default for all folder types. You will still be able to change a individual folder type template to what you want and have Vista remember it afterwards. Value Description NotSpecified All Items folder type template Contacts Contacts folder type template Music Music Details folder type template MusicIcons Music Icons folder type template Documents Documents folder type template Pictures Pictures and Videos folder type template with large icons Increase Folder View Cache Memory :This will increase the amount of folders to be remembered for changes to the folder view settings. OPTION: This is a optional step, but the increase will help ensure that Vista does not forget. Steps 1-9 must be done first before you do this section. If you decide to skip it, them go to step 25. 21. In regedit, go to: (See screenshot below) HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Classes\Local Settings\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Shell 22. In the right pane, right click on BagMRU Size. NOTE: If you do not have the BagMRU Size value, then right click on a empty space in the right pane and click on New and DWORD (32-bit) Value. Type in BagMRU Size and press enter. 23. Click on Modify. 24. Dot the Decimal and type 20000 (folders) and click on OK. (See screenshot below)5000 is the default number of folders to be remembered. Deleting Local Group Policy Setting : This will show you how to check to see if this Group Policy setting has been set to not save the position of open windows or the size and position of the taskbar when users log off, and to delete if it is so that the changed will now be remembered at exit. 25. In regedit, go to: (See screenshot below) HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer 26. In the right pane, look to see if you have NoSaveSettings. If you do, then right click on NoSaveSettings and click on Delete and Yes to confirm deletion. (See screenshot above) 27. In regedit, go to: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer 28. Repeat step 26 if you have NoSaveSettings here as well. Wrapping it Up : 29. Close regedit. 30. Log off and log on,or restart the computer to apply the reset and to let Vista rebuild the registry keys with a clean slate. 31. Open Folder Options. A) Click on the View tab. (See screenshot below) B) Check Remember each folder's view settings. If left unchecked, Vista will ignore custom view settings for every folder and have every folder open using default settings instead. Only, uncheck this setting to force all folders to stop using display settings you have specified. C) Uncheck Restore previous folder windows at logon. D) Click on OK. 32. Make the changes you want for the opened Windows Explorer windows. 33. To Apply These Changes to All the Same Folder Type Templates For more information on folder templates, see: How to Choose and Customize a Folder Type Template and Columns in Vista and How to Change the Windows Explorer Columns and Sort Order in Vista A) Open Folder Options WARNING: Folder Options must be opened from within the same Windows Explorer window that you are changing or the Apply to Folders button will be grayed out. B) Click on the View tab. (See screenshot below step 31D) C) Click on the Apply to Folders button. D) Click on Yes in the confirmation prompt. E) Click on OK. 34. To Apply Changes to Just this Window Template A) Close the window when you make your changes to the Windows Explorer window to save the folder view settings for just that one window.Vista will only remember the way it is when you last closed the window. 35. To Apply Changes to All Window Templates A) In step 20 above, you can change the default folder template used of (NotSpecified) to what you want instead for all folder templates without having to restart the computer again. That's it, Shawn How to Back Up and Restore Your Folder View Settings in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 How to Change a Windows Explorer Folder Type Template in Vista How to Change a Default Open Window Size for a Shortcut in Vista How to Change Windows Explorer Default Open Location How to Use the Windows Explorer Address Bar in Vista How to Enable or Disable the Menu Bar in Vista How to Change the Windows Explorer Columns and Sort Order in Vista How to Enable or Disable Folder Options in Vista How to Turn the Preview Pane On or Off in Vista How to Turn the Navigation Pane On or Off in Vista How to Change the Sort Order for Numbers in File and Folder Names in Vista How to Enable or Disable Auto-Hide for Vista Explorer Full Screen F11 How to Hide or Show File Names in Vista How to Disable Auto Arrange in Vista Windows Explorer to have Free Sorting
How To Turn DEP On or Off for a Program in Vista and Windows 7 Data Execution Prevention (DEP) is a security feature that can help prevent damage to your computer from viruses and other security threats. Harmful programs can try to attack Windows by attempting to run (also known as execute) code from system memory (RAM) locations reserved only for Windows and other authorized programs. These types of attacks can harm your programs and files. If DEP notices a program on your computer using memory incorrectly, it closes the program and notifies you with the DEP stop error. DEP is ran in a software mode and in a hardware mode. If your processor supports DEP (NX for AMD, and XD for Intel), then you will have hardware and software DEP. If it doesn't, then Vista will just use software DEP. 64 bit applications will have DEP enabled all the time by default, but 32 bit applications do not and must have DEP manually enabled for them. For more information, see: Windows Help and Support: Data Execution Prevention: FAQs If you choose to protect all programs, you can still turn off DEP for individual programs if you know that they are safe. If a program does not run correctly when DEP is turned on, check for a DEP compatible version of the program or an update from the software publisher before you change any DEP settings.Do not disable DEP, or exclude (OptOut) a program, unless you have adequate protection and are having problems only with a known safe program that DEP will not let run and you cannot live without it. Adequate Protection: Antivirus program with realtime scanning (EX: Avast or AVG are good ones) A spyware/adware program with realtime scanning (EX: Windows Defender, Spybot Search and Destroy) Enable Vista UAC (User Account Control). It asks you for permission first for anything that wants to run with full access to the computer. Here's How: NOTE: 64 bit programs will always have DEP turned on. You cannot change this. 1. Open the Control Panel. (Classic View) A) Click on the System icon. B) Go to step 3. OR 2. Open the Start menu. A) Right click on Computer and click Properties. 3. Click on Advanced system settings.(in upper left green area) 4. Click on the Continue button in the UAC prompt. 5. Click on the Settings button under Performance section. (See screenshot below) 6. Click on the Data Execution Prevention tab. (See screenshot below) 7. Turn DEP On for Essential Windows Programs and Services Only NOTE: This turns on DEP for only the 32 bit system programs and services. This is the default setting. A) Dot Turn on DEP for essential Windows programs and services only. B) Go to step 9. 8. Turn DEP On for All Programs and Services Except for the Ones you Select NOTE: This turns on DEP for every 32 bit program except for the ones that you add to the list. The listed program will have DEP turned off for it. A) Dot Turn on DEP for all programs and services except those I select. B) Click Add to add the programs (32 bit) that you do not want to use the DEP feature. C) Navigate to the program's .exe file that you want to add to the DEP exclusion list and select it, then click on Open. 9. Click on OK to apply. (See screenshot below step 8B) 10. Restart the computer to apply changes. That's it, Shawn How to Turn Windows Features On or Off in Vista How to Enable or Disable DEP in Vista and Windows 7 Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) How to Create a "DEP System Properties" Shortcut in Vista and Windows 7
How to Add View and Print File Directory to the Context Menu in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 This will show you how to add View File Directory and Print File Directory in the context menu for all folders and drives. This will allow you to easily print or view a file and folder directory list when you right click on a folder and click on View File Directory or Print File Directory. The file directory list will not include the files in a subfolder. It will only have the subfolder listed. You will need to right click on the subfolder to view or print it's file directory. It may take a little bit to view or print the file directory of a drive if the drive is very large with a lot of files on it. EXAMPLE: Folder Context Menu Before and After View and Print File Directory is Added Add or Remove "Print File Directory" to the Context Menu 1. Click on the Download button below to download the file below. Print_File_Directory.zip https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/print_file_directory-zip.23983/ 2. Click on Save and save the ZIP file to the Desktop. 3. Right click on the downloaded Print_File_Directory.zip and click on Open. 4. Click on Allow in the UAC prompt. 5. Extract (drag and drop) the Add_Print_Directory.reg, Remove_Print_Directory.reg, and printdir.bat files to the desktop. 6. Right click on the extracted .bat file, click on Properties, click on the General tab, and unblock it. NOTE: If you do not see a Unblock button, then the file is already unblocked. 7. To Add "Print File Directory" to the Context Menu A) Right click on the extracted and unblocked printdir.bat file and click on Copy. B) In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows and right click on a empty area and click on Paste. (See screenshot below) C) Click on Continue in the Destination Folder Access Denied prompt, and on Continue in the UAC prompt. D) Right click on the extracted Add_Print_Directory.reg file and click on Merge. E) Click on Run, Continue (UAC), Yes, and then OK when prompted. F) Go to step 9. 8. To Remove "Print File Directory" from the Context Menu A) In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows and right click on printdir.bat and click on Delete. (See screenshot below step 7C) B) Click on Continue in the Destination Folder Access Denied prompt, and on Continue in the UAC prompt. C) Right click on the extracted Remove_Print_Directory.reg file, and click on Merge. D) Click on Run, Continue (UAC), Yes, and then OK when prompted. 9. Your done, you can now delete the downloaded ZIP and other extracted files on the Desktop if you like. 10. When you click on Print File Directory, a file directory list for the selected folder will be sent to the printer. Add or Remove "View File Directory" to the Context Menu 1. Click on the Download button below to download the file below. View_File_Directory.zip https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/view_file_directory-zip.23984/ 2. Click on Save and save the ZIP file to the Desktop. 3. Right click on the downloaded View_File_Directory.zip and click on Open. 4. Click on Allow for UAC prompt. 5. Extract (drag and drop) the Add_View_Directory.reg, Remove_View_Directory.reg, and viewdir.bat files to the desktop. 6. Right click on the extracted .bat file, click on Properties, click on the General tab, and unblock it. NOTE: If you do not see a Unblock button, then the file is already unblocked. 7. To Add "View File Directory" to the Context Menu A) Right click on the extracted viewdir.bat file and click on Copy. B) In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows and right click on a empty area and click Paste. (See screenshot below) C) Click on Continue in the Destination Folder Access Denied prompt, and on Continue in the UAC prompt. D) Right click on the extracted Add_View_Directory.reg and click on Merge. E) Click on Run, Continue (UAC), Yes, and then OK when prompted. F) Go to step 9. 8. To Remove "View File Directory" from the Context Menu A) In Windows Explorer, navigate to C:\Windows and right click on viewdir.bat and click on Delete. (See screenshot below step 7C) B) Click on Continue in the Destination Folder Access Denied prompt, and on Continue in the UAC prompt. C) Right click on the downloaded Remove_View_Directory.reg file and click on Merge. E) Click on Run, Continue (UAC), Yes, and then OK when prompted. 8. Your done, you can delete the ZIP and other extracted files on the Desktop if you want to. 9. This is an example of what you see when you click on View File Directory. (See screenshot below) That's it, Shawn How to Expand the Context (Shortcuts) Menu in Vista How to Customize the Context Menu for the Start Menu in Vista How to Customize the Send To Context Menu in Vista How to Customize the Recycle Bin Context Menu in Vista How to Add Encrypt and Decrypt to the Context Menu in Vista How to Add and Remove a New Menu Item in Vista How to Add Take Ownership to the Context Menu in Vista How to Copy the Full Path of a File or Folder in Vista How to Add Flip 3D to the Context Menu in Vista How to Restore or Remove New from the Context Menu in Vista How to Enable or Disable the Context Menu in Vista How to Remove or Show Drives in the Vista and Windows 7 "Send To" Context Menu How to Add COPY TO FOLDER and MOVE TO FOLDER to the Context Menu in Vista How to Save and Print a Directory List for a File and Folder in Vista How to Add or Remove Copy as Path from the Vista Context Menu How to Add or Remove Send To from the Vista Context Menu How to Add or Remove Turn Aero On or Off from the Vista Context Menu How to Add System Properties to Computer Context Menu in Vista How to Restore or Remove "Restore Previous Versions" from the Vista Context Menu How to Add Empty Folder and Subfolders to the Vista Context Menu How to Add "Copy Content to Clipboard" to Context Menu in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8
How to Disable or Enable the Transient Multimon Manager (TMM) in Vista Transient Multimon Manager (TMM) is a Microsoft Windows Vista operating system feature targeted at improving the user experience of connecting and disconnecting displays, particularly for the mobile user. This is the 2-3 second delay followed by a blank black screen as Vista searches for monitor changes when you startup Vista. For more information on TMM, see: Microsoft: Transient Multimon Manager (TMM)TMM is enabled by default in Vista. Disabling TMM will get rid of that 2-3 second delay at startup.If you do not use a external monitor for a mobile PC or multiple monitors on a desktop PC, then you can safely disable TMM. Do not disable TMM if you do. Here's How: 1. Open the Start Menu. A) Click on All Programs, Accessories, System Tools, and Task Schedular. B) Go to step 2. OR 1. Open the Control Panel (Classic View). A) Click on Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. 2. If prompted, click on Continue in the UAC prompt. 3. In the left pane, expand Task Scheduler, Task Scheduler Library, Microsoft, Windows, and click on MobilePC. (See screenshot below) 4. In the middle pane, right click on TMM. 5. To Disable TMM A) Click on Disable. B) Go to step 7. 6. To Enable TMM A) Click on Enable. NOTE: TMM is enabled by default in Vista. 7. Close Task Scheduler. 8. Log off and log on, or restart the computer to see the change. That's it, Shawn How to Change the Screen Resolution in Vista How to Change the DPI Scale in Vista How to Change the Screen Refresh Rate in Vista How to Speed Up the Performance of Vista How to Speed Up Vista Boot Up Time
How to Run Disk Defragmenter from the Command Prompt in Vista This will show you how to run Vista Disk Defragmenter from the command prompt instead of the program within Vista to use more options and details. Here's How: Wait until your hard drive stops running before closing the command prompt to allow the defragmentation to finish. It may take a while to finish depending on how large and fragmented your hard drive is. 1. Open a elevated command prompt. 2. Choose the option you want to do below. 3. For a Complete List of Commands - A) In the elevated command prompt, type defrag.exe -? and press Enter. (See screenshot below) 4. To Defragment a Drive or Volume - A) In the elevated command prompt, type a option in bold below you want to do. (See screenshot below) defrag.exe c: for the C: drive NOTE: You can use whatever drive letter to defrag it. defrag.exe -c for all drives or volumes. B) Press Enter. 5. To Perform an Analysis Only and Not Defragment - A) In the elevated command prompt, type the option in bold below. (See screenshot below) defrag.exe c: -a for an analysis on the C: drive NOTE: You can use whatever drive letter to defrag it. B) Press Enter. 6. To Perform a Partial Defragmentation Only - A) In the elevated command prompt, type a option in bold below you want to do. (See screenshot below) defrag.exe c: -r for the C: drive. NOTE: You can use whatever drive letter to defrag it. defrag.exe -c -r for all drives or volumes. B) Press Enter. 7. To Perform a Full Defragmentation - A) In the elevated command prompt, type a option in bold below you want to do. (See screenshot below) defrag.exe c: -w for the C: drive. NOTE: You can use whatever drive letter to defrag it. defrag.exe -c -w for all drives and volumes. B) Press Enter. 8. To Force a Defragmentation on a Drive With Low Space - A) In the elevated command prompt, type a option in bold below you want to do. (See above sections) defrag.exe c: -f for the C: drive. defrag.exe c: -w -f for the C: drive with full defragmentation. defrag.exe c: -r -f for the C: drive with partial defragmentation. defrag.exe -c -f for all drives and volumes. defrag.exe -c -w -f for all drives with full defragmentation. defrag.exe -c- r -f for all drives with partial defragmentation. B) Press Enter. 9. For Verbose or Detailed Mode - A) In the elevated command prompt, type a option in bold below you want to do. (See screenshot below) defrag.exe c: -f -v for the C: drive. defrag.exe c: -a -v for the C: drive with analysis. defrag.exe c: -w -f -v for the C: drive with full defragmentation. defrag.exe c: -r -f -v for the C: drive with partial defragmentation. defrag.exe -c -f -v for all drives and volumes. defrag.exe -c -w -f -v for all drives with full defragmentation. defrag.exe -c- r -f -v for all drives with partial defragmentation. B) Press Enter. That's it, Shawn How to Change the Schedule for Disk Defragmenter in Vista List of Commands for Vista and How to Use Them How to Use Open Command Prompt Window Here in Vista How to Enable or Disable the Command Prompt in Vista How to Enable or Disable Defrag of Boot Files at Startup in Vista How to Create a Defragment Boot Files Shortcut in Vista How to Add Defragment to Context Menu in Windows 7 and Vista
How to Make a "Create System Restore Point" Shortcut in XP, Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 This tutorial will provide you with a create a manual system restore point shortcut that will instantly create a restore point with an optional description and success message in XP, Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8. Restore points contain information about registry settings and other system information that Windows uses. System Restore points do not include personal user files in the C:\Users\(user-name) folders. This will work for 32 bit and 64 bit Vista. You must have System Restore and the services responsible enabled for this shortcut to work. If not you will get the error message below when you try to use the shortcut below. See: How to Disable or Enable System Restore in Vista If you dual boot with Windows XP, then everytime you start in XP the System Restore Points and all except the most recent Complete PC Backup files in Vista get deleted. If you have missing restore points, then also see: System Restore "restore points" are missing or deleted EXAMPLE: Create System Restore Point with description shortcut NOTE: When you click on the Create System Restore Point shortcut, you will see this window. Just type in a name for the restore point, and click on OK to create the restore point. Here's How: 1. For how see updated tutorial here: System Restore Point Shortcut - Windows 7 Forums That's it, Shawn How to Create a System Restore Shortcut in Vista How to Create a System Restore Point in Vista How to Undo the Last System Restore in Vista How to Do a System Restore in Vista How to Change the System Restore Disk Space Usage in Vista How to Turn System Restore On or Off in Vista How to Stop System Restore Points from being Deleted in Vista when Dual Booting with XP How to Restore Previous Versions of a File and Folder in Vista How to Change the Automatic System Restore Point Settings in Vista Task Scheduler How to Enable or Disable Create Vista System Restore Point when New Device Driver is Installed How to Enable or Disable Create Vista System Restore Point when a Application is Installed
How to Enable or Disable DEP in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 Data Execution Prevention (DEP) is a security feature that can help prevent damage to your computer from viruses and other security threats. Harmful programs can try to attack Windows by attempting to run (also known as execute) code from system memory (RAM) locations reserved only for Windows and other authorized programs. These types of attacks can harm your programs and files. If DEP notices a program on your computer using memory incorrectly, it closes the program and notifies you with the DEP stop error. DEP is ran in a software mode and in a hardware mode. If your processor supports DEP (NX for AMD, and XD for Intel), then you will have hardware and software DEP. If it doesn't, then Vista will just use software DEP. 64 bit applications will have DEP enabled all the time by default, but 32 bit applications do not and must have DEP manually enabled for them. For more information, see: Windows Help and Support: Data Execution Prevention: FAQsIf a program is being closed by DEP, then make sure that it is a DEP compatible version and check for an updated version. If it is not DEP compatible, then you can uninstall the program or turn off DEP for that particular program.Do not disable DEP, or exclude (OptOut) a program, unless you have adequate protection and are having problems only with a known safe program that DEP will not let run and you cannot live without it. Remember DEP stopped the program for a reason. Either it is just a improperly running program, or some sort of malware trying to get into restricted memory. Adequate Protection: Antivirus program with realtime scanning (EX: Avast or AVG are good ones) A spyware/adware program with realtime scanning (EX: Windows Defender, Spybot Search and Destroy) Enable Vista's UAC (User Account Control). It asks you for permission first for anything that wants to run with full access to the computer. EXAMPLE: DEP Enabled and Disable NOTE: DEP is enabled by default. If you installed Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET), then it will be used by Windows instead of DEP and gray out the DEP settings like below. To Enable or Disable DEP in Vista NOTE: If you have a 64-bit CPU, then you may also have a no exectute option in BIOS that is the built in DEP on the CPU. 1. Open an elevated command prompt. 2. To Enable DEP A) In the elevated command prompt, type in bold below and press Enter. (See screenshot below) NOTE: If for some reason this command does not enable DEP after restarting the computer, then use the bcdedit.exe /set {current} nx AlwaysOn command instead. bcdedit.exe /set {current} nx OptIn B) You should get a success message back C) Close the elevated command prompt. D) Restart the computer to apply. 3. To Disable DEP A) In the command prompt, type in bold belowand press Enter. (See screenshot below) bcdedit.exe /set {current} nx AlwaysOff B) You should get a success message back. C) Close the command prompt. D) Restart the computer to apply. 4. To Verify the Status of DEP A) In the command prompt, type in bold below and press Enter. (See screenshot below table) wmic OS Get DataExecutionPrevention_SupportPolicy B) You will get a number (see table below) that will tell you the status of DEP. C) Close command prompt when done. 2 is the default setting. Number Description Status AlwaysOff DEP is disabled for all processes. (Step 3 above) 1 AlwaysOn DEP is enabled for all processes. (Note under step 2) 2 OptIn DEP is enabled for only Windows system components and services have DEP applied. Default setting. (Step 2 above) 3 OptOut DEP is enabled for all processes. Administrators can manually create a list of specific applications which do not have DEP applied. (How to Turn DEP On or Off for a Program) Enable or Disable DEP in Internet Explorer NOTE: This will be for the 32 bit version of Internet Explorer. For a 32 bit Vista version: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe For a 64 bit Vista version: C:\Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe Some Active X Internet Explorer add-ons may not work with DEP on. It can cause them to crash and prevent the startup of IE by DEP closing it. If this happens to you, then see: How to Fix a Crashing Internet Explorer in Vista or disable DEP again. 1. Open the Start Menu. 2. Click on All Programs and right click on Internet Explorer, then click Run as administrator. NOTE: If you cannot get IE7 to open using step 2, then click on All Programs and Accessories. Next, right click on Internet Explorer (No Add-ons) and click on Run as administrator instead. WARNING: If you do not use Run as administrator, the Enable memory protection to help mitigate online attacks option will be grayed out in steps 5 and 6 below, and you will not be able to enable or disable it. 3. In Internet Explorer, click on Tools and Internet Options. 4. Click on the Advanced tab. (See screenshot below) 5. To Enable DEP for the 32 bit Internet Explorer A) Under Security, check Enable memory protection to help mitigate online attacks. B) Go to step 7. 6. To Disable DEP for the 32 bit Internet Explorer A) Under Security, uncheck Enable memory protection to help mitigate online attacks. 7. Click on OK to apply. That's it, Shawn How to Turn Windows Features On or Off in Vista How to Turn DEP On or Off for a Program Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) How to Create a "DEP System Properties" Shortcut in Vista and Windows 7
How to Change or Move Virtual Memory Paging File in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 If your computer lacks the random access memory (RAM) needed to run a program or operation, Windows uses virtual memory to compensate. Virtual memory combines your computer’s RAM with temporary space on your hard drive. When RAM runs low, virtual memory moves data from RAM to a space called a paging file. Moving data to and from the paging file frees up the RAM to complete its work. Windows manages the virtual memory size automatically by default. This will show you how to manually change the size of virtual memory if the default size is not enough for your needs, and how to change what drive is used for the paging file. For more detailed information about the page file, see: Mark's Blog : Pushing the Limits of Windows: Virtual Memory and The Pagefile Done Right! | Citrix Blogs For more information about the new swap file in Windows 8, see: Windows 8 / Windows Server 2012: The New Swap File - Ask the Performance Team - Site Home - TechNet Blogs The more RAM your computer has, the better your programs will generally run performance wise since Windows may not have to use virtual memory as often. If a lack of RAM is slowing your computer, you might be tempted to increase virtual memory to compensate. However, your computer can read data from RAM much more quickly than from a hard disk, so adding RAM is a better solution. Plus, Windows usually does a great job at managing virtual memory for you. The Virtual Memory Paging File is hidden protected operating system file at this location: C:\pagefile.sys To improve the performance of Windows, you can place the page file on a second physical hard drive instead of the same C: drive that Windows is on. Doing this allows Windows to dump temp junk onto one drive while not having to interrupt reads or writes on the other drive. You will not gain any performance by moving the page file to just another partition on the same HDD that Windows is installed on. To Reset the Page File: Turn the page file off and on for the drive it's on with restarting the computer after each time. If you receive any type of low memory error message like below, then you need to either add more RAM or increase the size of the page file so that you can run the programs on your computer. I would advise to not turn off the page file even if you have a lot of RAM installed. Some programs will still require using the page file to run properly. Here's How: NOTE: You will need to be logged in as an administrator to be able to modify the page file. 1. Open the Start Menu. A) Right click on the Computer button and click on Properties. B) Go to step 3. OR 2. Open the Control Panel (Classic View - Vista or Icons view - Windows 7). A) Click on the System icon. 3. Click on Advanced system settings. (See screenshot below) NOTE: While your here, note how much Memory (RAM) you have installed under the System section. 4. If prompted by UAC, then click on Continue (Vista) or Yes (Windows 7). 5. In the Advanced tab, click on the Settings button in the Performance section. (See screenshot below) 6. Click on the Advanced tab. (See screenshot below) 7. Under Virtual memory, click on the Change button. 8. To Turn Off Automatic Virtual Memory Management for All Drives A) Uncheck the Automatically manage paging file size for all drives box. (See screenshot below) NOTE: This turns off automatic virtual memory management by Windows so you can manually change the drive and size to what you want instead. B) Go to step 10. 9. To Turn On Automatic Virtual Memory Management for All Drives A) If one of the listed drives (ex: C: ) is set as System Managed already, then check the Automatically manage paging file size for all drives box. Click on OK and go to step 17. (See screenshot below) OR B) If one of the listed drives is not set as System Managed already, then uncheck the Automatically manage paging file size for all drives box and do step 10 and step 12. 10. To Select a Drive to Add or Change the Paging File NOTE: By default, Windows uses the same drive letter that it is installed on. This system drive is usually the C: drive. WARNING: If you have another internal NTFS drive listed and want to use it instead, then make sure it is as fast or faster than the drive Windows is installed on. Make sure you only use a separate hard drive, not another partition on the same hard drive as Windows is installed on. This will cause a decrease in performance if you do. You cannot move the page file to an external or removable drive. A) Click on a listed hard drive you want to change or add a paging file to for Windows to use. (See screenshot below step 9A) 11. To Have a Custom Paging File Size for the Selected Drive NOTE: You would do this if you do not want to use the automatic system managed size by Windows. A) Dot Custom size. (See screenshots below step 15) B) Type in a size for the Initial size in MB (1 GB = 1024 MB). NOTE: This will be the minimum size. C) Type in a size for the Maximum size you want in MB (1 GB = 1024 MB). D) Go to step 14. 12. To Have a System Managed Paging File Size for the Selected Drive NOTE: This will let Windows automatically manage the size of the paging file for this selected drive as needed. A) Dot System managed size. (See screenshots below step 9) B) Go to step 14. 13. To Remove the Paging File from the Selected Drive WARNING: Make sure that you have at least one drive selected to have a paging file on. Otherwise your computer may slow down dramatically. NOTE: You would usually only do this if you have more than one drive that you already added a paging file to from step 11 above. A) Dot No paging file. (See screenshots below step 15) 14. Click the Set button. (See left screenshot below) NOTE: Repeat steps 10 to 14 if you would like to make more changes to the paging file, or add a paging file to another listed drive. 15. Click on OK. (See right screenshot below) 16. If the Paging File Size was Decreased NOTE: If the paging file was decreased, the computer will need to be restarted before the changes can be applied. You will not see this if you increased the size. A) Click OK. (See screenshot below) 17. Click on OK. (See screenshot below step 7) 18. Click on OK. (See screenshot below step 5) 19. If the Paging File Size was Decreased NOTE: You will not see this if you increased the size. A) Click Restart Now. (See screenshot below) NOTE: Be sure to save and close anything open first. This will restart the computer immediately. That's it, Shawn How to Start the Memory Diagnostics Tool in Vista How to Disable or Enable Vista Services With a Advice Guide How to Use ReadyBoost in Vista How to Change What Superfetch will Preload in Vista How to Disable or Enable Superfetch in Vista How to Enable or Disable Clear Virtual Memory Paging File at Shutdown in Vista and Windows 7 How to Free Up and Recover Hard Drive Space in Windows 7 How to Enable or Disable Page File Encryption in Vista and Windows 7 How to Change Default Location of Temporary Files Folder in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 How to Open Advanced Tools in Windows 7 and Windows 8
How to Change the Startup Sound in Vista When you open the Sounds control panel and select the Sounds tab, you are presented with the current Sound Scheme and a list of sounds attached to program activities and various Windows events. You can play them and change them as you see fit, and even save this as a custom Sound Scheme. You will notice that there are sound event entries for Windows Exit, Logon, and Logoff. But there isn't one for Start. The reason why is that Microsoft spent a lot of money paying Robert Fripp (of King Crimson fame) to come up with the sound, and they want to be sure that this signature sound is played every time Windows starts. Well, they do allow you to mute the startup sound, but you are not allowed to change it. The nuts and bolts of it In the System32 folder, there is a file called "imageres.dll", which contains the program instructions for Image Resources, as well as a majority of the system icons used in the operating system. It also contains the Windows Startup sound file (in WAVE format). For those of you who are adept at hacking, you'll immediately recognize that there shouldn't be anything stopping you from changing this file. And that's correct. If you use a binary resource editor, like Resource Hacker, you can easily replace this part of the file. For those of you who haven't a clue and/or might be uneasy about modifying it, there is a program available to assist. It's called "Startup Sound Changer", authored by WinAero. It's a very simple utility that does not install itself on your computer--you just execute it directly. It will not only play for you the current sound and allow you to replace it with an alternative wave file, you can also restore the original. The caveat So it should be easy to do this, yes? Well, yes and no. There is a ramification with modifying this file. Vista has an elaborate file version checking and control system to help avoid messy problems of files being corrupted or unduly changed by either undisciplined or rogue software. If you change this file, you will find that after you reboot the 2nd time, the "imageres.dll" file will have been reverted back to the original. OK, no problem then, you can just create a script that will force replacement just before you shut down your computer, right? Well that will work, but it certainly isn't neat or elegant. And if Microsoft ever decides to change this file, you'll have to make your changes to the new version (but thankfully, Microsoft has yet to change it even after 2 service packs). The relevant details on imageres.dll Imageres.dll has two primary versions: one for 32 bit and one for 64 bit. Both are on your computer if you are running 64 bit, but only one will exist in the \Windows\System32 folder (obviously the one that matches your operating system bit type). Here is the rundown on imageres.dll residency (all under \Windows): .\System32 - the primary location of the current version. .\SysWOW64 - the 32 bit compatibility location, which is present on 64 bit versions. .\Winsxs\amd64_microsoft-windows.. - a long folder name with this prefix, for the 64 bit version. An example: "amd64_microsoft-windows-imageres_31bf3856ad364e35_6.0.6000.16386_none_36a57cbab3586699" .\Winsxs\x86_microsoft-windows.. - a long folder name with this prefix, for the 32 bit version. .\Winsxs\Backup - the backup location, where the file will have a cryptic name with a prefix of "amd64_microsoft-windows" or "x86_microsoft-windows", but "imageres" will be embedded inside it. An example: "amd64_microsoft-windows-imageres_31bf3856ad364e35_6.0.6000.16386_none_36a57cbab3586699_imageres.dll_44f44625" In the 64 bit version, Microsoft keeps both versions in case there is a 32 bit application that will be installed in the environment. While the 64 bit version resides in System32 (I know, you'd expect System64 -- it's a long story), the 32 bit version resides in SysWOW64 (you'd expect SysWOW32, right?). You may also notice, if you search on imageres in these folders, is that the files are of the same size. They actually do possess different information inside them though, so it would be a mistake to assume the files are identical (I made this mistake myself and had problems with resolving SFC errors). OK, well, what are the ramifications if the altered imageres is not in Winsxs? What will happen is that after you reboot, Windows will detect the unexpected file and replace it from one within the "store" (Winsxs). This means that you'll have to replace the file every 2nd time you reboot. Also, if you run SFC /scannow, which is something one should do from time to time in conjunction with system maintenance, errors will be flagged on the imageres.dll file and it will be replaced. From an operational standpoint, the file would still work correctly if it wasn't replaced. But Windows will replace it. That is, unless the store copy is altered as well. The workaround One might argue that modifying imageres.dll is not the right thing to do and it should be left alone. No 3rd party application would be touching this file anyway. It belongs to Microsoft and should be off limits. But if you know that the file is sound, aside from the WAVE file replacement, then it should be perfectly fine. Here's what you should do: Make a backup of the imageres.dll files to be replaced. I suggest doing this with the replicated folder structure, then zipping this up into a single archive file. Modify the imageres.dll file, using a resource editor or a specialized 3rd party program. Replace \System32\imageres.dll with the modified version Replace \Winsxs versions of imageres.dll that are applicable to your Vista installation (32 bit or 64 bit). Note that in the \Winsxs\backup folder, you should make sure the cryptic name matches the original. Replacement can be done manually, assuming you take ownership of the original files, rename them to something ".bak", then rename the new version as the original name. It can also be done automatically using the Robocopy command. The Robocopy command is the safest and easiest way to make the change, because you don't have to struggle with denied file access permissions and executing is a single step (from the Windows Repair command line option when booting from your operating system installation disc). Essentially you replicate the folder structure of where the files will be placed with file copies inside, and give it an alternate root name "e.g. modfile". So for example, you'll create "C:\modfile\Windows\System32" and "C:\modfile\Windows\Winsxs" folders with respective sub folders and the files copied to the corresponding places. Then after booting up in repair mode from your installation disc, in Robocopy you will reference this folder with the command line entry as follows: "robocopy c:\modfile c:\ /E /IS" (notice "modfile"; you would use whatever name you chose, if you didn't use this one). You will see a copious amount of output as file folders are traversed (winsxs is huge). It will take a few moments and then at the end you will see a status report of what took place, and you should see the "failed" counter reading zero. After this, reboot (and remember to take your installation disc out of your DVD drive). After you do this, SFC /scannow will still find a problem (it must get the reference hash code from somewhere else, instead of the backup file in Winsxs), but it will find the store file to be faulty as well and so it won't replace it. Your computer will still function normally. Alternatively, you could avoid changing your DLL store in Winsxs and just keep the Startup Sound Change utility handy to make the change again in the future, if it gets inadvertently switched back again (by running SFC /scannow or some other Windows maintenance done by Update). And that's all there is to it. Again, keep the originals as a backup in a zipped up archive that contains the folder structure for easy replacement. If you see any discrepancies with what I've posted or have some suggestions, feel free to post about them. Thanks! DISCLAIMER: This tutorial is provided only as a suggested guide to modifying the imageres.dll file. I take no responsibility if you make a mistake and corrupt your system. Obviously the most important thing to do with any modification like this is to back up your system accordingly (at the bare minimum, ensure you have a restore point, but also make a full system backup). Footnote: A big thanks to Tom982, who helped me through the struggle of having replaced imageres.dll incorrectly and got my system back to 100% integrity. Thanks Tom! :cool: How to Change a Computer Event Sound in Vista How to Enable or Disable the Startup Sound in Vista and Windows 7
How to Repair and Verify the Integrity of Vista System Files with System File Checker System File Checker (SFC) checks that all Vista system files are where they should be as they were by default and not corrupted, changed, or damaged. This will show you how to verify and repair the integrity of Vista system files with the System File Checker (SFC) command codes.If SFC Cannot Finish or Repair a File: NOTE: This is for when after you run the SFC scan below, it cannot finish or repair a file. There is no guarantee that SFC can repair the system files if they are corrupted or damaged to much. If SFC still cannot repair them after this, then you might try running Check Disk (chkdsk), System Restore, a Repair Installation, or a clean reinstall of Vista. 1. How to Read the CBS.LOG NOTE: When SFC runs, it logs it's actions to the C:\WINDOWS\LOGS\CBS\CBS.LOG. You can find the specific SFC entries by searching for the [SR] tags in the log. A) For how to see only the SFC scan details in the CBS.LOG: Open a elevated command prompt. Copy and paste the command below into the elevated command prompt and press Enter. findstr /c:"[SR]" %windir%\logs\cbs\cbs.log >%userprofile%\Desktop\sfcdetails.txt Close the elevated command prompt. Click on the sfcdetails.txt file that was just placed on your desktop to see the SFC scan details (ones with the [SR] tags) in the CBS.LOG. You can safely delete the sfcdetails.txt file afterwards if you like. 2. Replace the Files that SFC Cannot Fix NOTE: If SFC cannot fix a file, it will be listed in the CBS.LOG above. Read the CBS.LOG to find out what file it is so you can replace it with a good copy. A) For how, see: General Tips - Extract Files from Vista Installation DVD Be aware that if you have modified your system files as in theming explorer/system files, running sfc/scannow will revert the system files such as explorer.exe back to it's default state. Make the appropriate backups of your system files that you have modified for theming if you wish to save them before running sfc/scannow. Here's How: NOTE: If sfc cannot start or finish, then try running it Safe Mode. 1. Open a elevated command prompt. 2. In the elevated command prompt, type the command that you want to do in bold below in steps A to E to run System File Check. A) sfc /scannow - Scans the integrity of all protected system files and repairs the system files if needed. (See screenshot below) NOTE: Restores Vista's original setup of system files. (EX: Fonts, wallpapers, System32 files, etc.) B) sfc /verifyonly - Scans and only verifies the integrity of all proteced system files only. (See screenshot below) NOTE: If it finds anything like in the screenshot below boxed in red at the bottom, you should run step A to see if it can fix it. See how to read the CBS log above for details on the SFC scan results. C) sfc /scanfile=(full path of file) - Scans the integrity of the chosen system file and repairs it if needed. EX: sfc /scanfile=C:\Windows\System32\kernel32.dll D) sfc /verifyfile=(full path of file) - Scans and only verifies the integrity of the chosen system file. EX: sfc /verifyfile=C:\Windows\System32\kernel32.dll E) sfc /? - For a list of all sfc command codes with description. (see screenshot below) 3. Press Enter. NOTE: It may take a while to finish. 4. Close the elevated command prompt when it finishes. 5. If you got a message to restart the computer in the command prompt, then restart the computer to finish the repair. If SFC could not fix something, then run the command again to see if it may be able to the next time. Sometimes it may take running the sfc /scannow command 3 times restarting the PC after each time to completely fix everything that it's able to. If not, then download and run the 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) System Update Readiness Tool for your same installed 32-bit or 64-bit Vista, restart the PC afterwards, and try the sfc /scannow command again. If still not, then you can attempt to run a System Restore using a restore point dated before the bad file occured to fix it. You may need to repeat doing a System Restore until you find a older restore point that may work. If still not, then you can use the steps in the yellow TIP box at the top of the tutorial to manually replace the files that SFC could not fix. That's it, Shawn How to Extract Files from the Vista Installation DVD How To Perform a Repair Installation For Vista How to Do a Clean Install of Vista with a Upgrade Version How to Do a Clean Install with a Full Version of Vista How to Start the Memory Diagnostics Tool in Vista How to Generate a System Health Report in Vista How to Troubleshoot the Computer with Reliability Monitor in Vista How to Do a Startup Repair in Vista How to Run Check Disk at Startup in Vista How to Do a System Restore in Vista How to Use the DirectX Diagnostic Tool in Vista How to Use the Resource Monitor in Vista List of Commands for Vista and How to Use Them How to Fix a Crashing Internet Explorer in Vista How to Disable or Enable Vista Services With a Advice Guide How to Restore Previous Versions of a File and Folder in Vista How to Start Vista in Safe Mode Cannot Rename or Move a File or Folder in Vista Fix How to Restore Missing Default Start Menu Shortcuts in Vista How to Restore TrustedInstaller as Owner of a File in Vista How to Open and Use File Signature Verification in Vista Access Files On Your Vista Install DVD
How to Do a Custom Installation of Vista This will show you how to do custom installation to have a clean install of Vista without formating the current Windows installation to have this previous Windows backed up to the Windows.old folder during the installation of Vista. This will replace your currently installed Windows installation with Vista. The C:\Windows.old folder contains all of the folders and files that were in the previous installation of Microsoft Windows.MINIMUM SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS FOR VISTA NOTE: For more information, see: Microsoft Windows Vista: Recommended System Requirements Vista Home Basic Processor: 1GHz (32 or 64 bit) System Memory (RAM): 512MB Hard Drive: 20GB with 15GB available for Vista Video Card: 32MB Memory and DirectX 9 Support DVD-ROM Drive Vista Home Premium, Business, or Ultimate Processor: 1GHz (32 or 64 bit) System Memory (RAM): 1GB Hard Drive: 40GB with 15GB available for Vista Video Card: 128MB Memory, DirectX 9 Support with: WDDM Driver, Pixel Shader 2.0, 32bits per pixel DVD-ROM Drive Here's How: 1. To Install from Within Current Windows Installation A) Place your Vista installation DVD (full version) into the DVD drive and click on the Run setup.exe option in the AutoPlay window from within Vista SP1. (See screenshot below) NOTE: If the AutoPlay window does not open, then open the drive folder in Computer and run the setup.exe file. B) Go to step 3 below. 2. To Install from Boot A) Boot the computer from your Vista installation DVD (full version). NOTE: Make sure that the CD/DVD drive is selected first in the boot order in the BIOS. B) When prompted, press any key to boot from the installation DVD. (See screenshot below) NOTE: You will only have about 8 seconds to press this key. If you miss it, you will have to restart the computer. C) Select your language preferences and click on the Next button. (See screeshot below). 3. Click on the Install Now button to start the installation. (See screenshot below) 4. If you did step 1, then uncheck the I want to help make Windows installation better box (unless you want to), and click on the Go online to get the latest updates for installation option. (See screenshot below) 5. If you did step 1, Vista will now check online for and install any available installation updates. (See screenshot below) 6. Type in your Vista product key number for the edition that you are installing. (See screenshot below step 7) 7. Uncheck the Automatically activate Windows when I'm online box unchecked, then click on the Next button. (See screenshot below) NOTE: You can activate Vista later after you make sure it is running properly. (See step 23 below) If you chose to automatically activate Vista online when you set up your computer, automatic activation begins trying to activate your copy of Windows three days after you log on for the first time. 8. Check the I accept the license terms box and click on Next. (See screenshot below) 9. Click on the Custom (advanced) option. (See screenshot below) 10. Select the hard drive or partition for the currently installed Windows installation that you want to install Vista on and click on the Next button. (See screenshot below) 11. Click on OK. (See screenshot below) 12. The installation of Vista will now begin. (See screenshot below) NOTE: During the installation process, your screen may flash and computer will restart a few times. 13. When it's finished, type in a user name, password, optional password hint, and select a display picture for your administrator user account, then click on Next. (See screenshot below) 14. Type in a computer name and choose a Desktop Background, then click on Next. (See screenshot below) 15. Click on Use recommended settings. (See screenshot below) 16. Set your time and date and time zone settings, then click on Next. (See screenshot below) 17. Click on your computer's location to select it for the network location settings. (See screenshot below) NOTE: It is best to select Public location for the best security. 18. Click on Start to boot Vista for the first time. (See screenshot below) 19. Before Vista boots for the first time it must perform a performance check to see what features to turn on or off. (See screenshots below) 20. Install all of your device drivers, then Windows Updates. 21. Update your WEI score. 22. Copy anything from the prevous installation from the C:\Windows.old folder that you want back. NOTE: When done, you can delete the Windows.old folder to save hard drive space. 23. When it is done, all you will need to do is to activate Vista. (See screenshot below) That's it, Shawn How to Delete the Windows.old Folder in Vista How to Restore your Windows.old Folder into a New Installation How to Perform a Repair Installation for Vista How to Do a Clean Install with a Full Version of Vista How to Do a Clean Install of Vista with a Upgrade Version How to Create a Vista SP1 Slipstream Installation DVD How to Create a Bootable USB Flash Thumb Drive to Install Vista How to Do a Dual Boot Installation with Windows 7 and Vista How to Do a Dual Boot Installation with Windows Vista and XP How to Do a Upgrade Installation with Windows 7 How to Create a Vista Recovery Disc
How to Add, Change, or Remove a Drive Letter in Vista This will allow you to either add, change, or remove (hide) a drive letter to organize them how you like. You must be logged in as an administrator to be able to do the steps in this tutorial. You can assign the letters D to Z to each drive on your computer. A and B are usually reserved for floppy disk drives, but if your computer does not have floppy disk drives, you can assign A and B to volumes. C is reserved for the drive Vista is installed on. You can see which drive letters are used on your computer by clicking on Computer in the Start menu. If you want to have all drive letters set to show or be removed from being displayed instead, then see: How to Show or Remove Drive Letters from Displaying in Vista If you dual boot, or with multiple operating systems, the OS that you boot to will always show as the C: drive in Computer. You will need to look in Disk Management to see how the true drive letters are partitions are positioned on the drive. Many MS‑DOS and Vista programs make references to specific drive letters in the registry. If you change a drive letter, some programs that you have already installed on that hard drive letter might not work correctly anymore. It is best to do this on a new drive or partition before installing anything on it. Through Disk Management 1. Open the Control Panel. (Classic View) A) Click on the Administrative Tools icon. B) Click on Computer Management. NOTE: If the Computer Management shortcut is not here, then you can navigate to C:\Windows\System32\compmgmt.msc and click on the compmgmt.msc instead. 2. Click on Continue in the UAC prompt. 3. In the left pane, click on Disk Management under Storage. (See screenshot below step 4) 4. Right-click on the partition or drive that you want to change, and click on Change Drive Letter and Paths. (See screenshot below) 5. To Change a Drive Letter NOTE: You cannot change a drive letter if the drive is either a system partition or a boot partition, like the partition that Vista is installed on. If you get an error, the partition or drive you are trying to change might be in use. Close any program or window that is using the partition or drive and try again. A) Select the drive letter, and click on the Change button. (See screenshot above) NOTE: If you are dual booting (Ex: Vista and Windows 7) and you want to change the drive letter for the Vista partition so you can see it in Windows 7, then click on the Add button if this screenshot below is empty. B) Select (dot) Assign the following drive letter. (See screenshot below) C) Select a drive letter that you want that is not already being used and click on OK. D) Click on Yes to confirm the drive letter change. (See screenshot below) E) Go to step 8. 6. To Add a Drive Letter NOTE: This is to assign a drive letter if one has been removed or not already assigned to the drive or partition. A) Click on the Add button. (See screenshot below) B) Do the same steps in step 5A to 5C above. C) Go to step 8. 7. To Remove a Drive Letter NOTE: This will only remove the drive letter and not the partition or drive. This can be useful if you are getting a low disk space warning for this drive letter. A) Click on the Remove button. (See screenshot below step 5) B) Click on Yes to confirm. (See screenshot below) C) Click on OK to close window. (See screenshot below step 5) 8. Close the Computer Management window. 9. Click on Computer in the Start Menu to confirm the changes. Manually in Registry Editor 1. Open the Start Menu, then type regedit in the search box and press enter. 2. If prompted by UAC, then click on Yes. 3. In regedit, navigate to the location below. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices 4. To Change a Drive Letter WARNING: Do not change the C: drive letter. A) Right click on a listed /DosDevices\(drive letter) (Ex: /DosDevices\D: ) that you want to change the drive letter of, then click on Rename. B) Rename it with a drive letter that you want to use, and is not already listed here, and press enter. For Example: If I wanted to change it from D: to K: , then I would rename it to /DosDevices\K: instead. 5. To Remove a Drive Letter WARNING: Do not remove the C: drive letter. A) Right click on a listed /DosDevices\(drive letter) (Ex: /DosDevices\D: ) that you want to remove the drive letter of, then click on Delete. B) Click on Yes to confirm the deletion. 6. Close regedit. 7. Log off and log on, or restart the computer to apply the changes. That's it, Shawn How to Shrink and Create a Partition with Disk Management in Vista How to Delete and Extend a Partition with Disk Management in Vista How to Change a Drive Icon in Vista How to Hide or Show Drive Letters in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8 How to Rename a Drive in Vista How to Disable or Enable Low Disk Space Warning in Vista How to Increase Hard Drive Performance in Vista How to Remove or Show Drives in the Vista and Windows 7 "Send To" Context Menu How to Restrict or Unrestict Drive Access in Vista How to Hide or Unhide a Drive in Vista How to Create a Drive Shortcut in Vista How to Mount or Dismount a Drive or Partition to a Folder in Vista How to Retain the DVD Drive Icon if Disappeared from Computer
How to See the Date and Time on the Taskbar in Vista This will show you how set the Taskbar so you can see both the time and date instead of just the default time.Yes, you could just hover your mouse pointer over the time, or click on the time, and the date will pop up. Except, maybe you would like to have the Date and Time to always show on the taskbar instead. EXAMPLE: Default Time Display EXAMPLE: Hover Mouse Pointer Over Time Display EXAMPLE: Click on Time to see Date and Time EXAMPLE: Date and Time Always Showing Display NOTE: This is what is exained how to do in the steps below. Here's How: 1. Right click on the taskbar. 2. Click to uncheck Lock the Taskbar. (See screenshot below) NOTE: If Lock the Taskbar is grayed out, then see: How to Enable or Disable Lock the Taskbar in Vista 3. Move your mouse pointer on the line between the taskbar and your desktop until it turns into a double arrow. (See area boxed in red in screenshot below) 4. When it turns to a double arrow, hold your left mouse button down and drag the taskbar up one more level and then release your left mouse button. NOTE: Sometimes, you may need to go up to a 3rd level depending on how you have your date format set to see it all. 5. Repeat steps 1 and 2, but click to check Lock the Taskbar back instead. That's it, Shawn How to Set the Clock to Military 24 Hour Time in Vista How to Use Internet Time Synchronization in Windows How to Change the Internet Time Synchronization Update Interval in Windows How to Add Additional Time Zone Clocks in Vista How to Add or Remove a Toolbar to the Taskbar in Vista How to Change the Quick Launch Icon Size in Vista How to Change the Date and Time in Vista How to Change the Time Zone in Vista How to Turn Open Window Thumbnail Previews On or Off for the Taskbar in Vista How to Use Quick Launch in Vista How to Hide or Show a Notification Icon in Vista How to Show or Hide All Notification Area System Tray Icons in Vista How to Turn Group Similar Taskbar Buttons On or Off in Vista How to Lock or Unlock the Taskbar in Vista How to Enable or Disable Taskbar Toolbars in Vista How to Enable or Disable the Vista Taskbar Context Menus How to Change the Date Format in Vista How to Enable or Disable Lock the Taskbar in Vista How to Show or Hide Folder Full Path in the Vista Taskbar Buttons How to Enable or Disable Taskbar Always on Top in Vista How to Turn Taskbar Auto-hide On or Off in Vista
How to Hide Favorite Links in a Windows Explorer Window in Vista This will show you how to hide or unhideFavorite Links inside the Navigation Pane in a Windows Explorer window. It contains shortcuts to the Documents, Pictures, Music, Recently Changed, Searches, and Public folders by default. For more information see: Microsoft Help and Support: Article KB926167 The Favorite Links folder is located at: C:\Users\(your username)\Links The Navigation Pane contains both the Favorite Links and Folders sections. You cannot turn off just one of these sections, only hide or adjust the size for one of them. If you turn off the Navigation Pane, you will turn off both of these sections as well. If the Favorite Links section is empty, then see: How to Fix Favorite Links Empty in Vista Windows Explorer Here's How: 1. Open a Windows Explorer window. 2. Move your mouse pointer on the line between the Favorite Links and Folders sections until it turns into a double arrow. (see screenshot below) 3. Hold the left mouse button down, while the mouse pointer is a double arrow, and drag the section up to hide it. (see screenshot below) NOTE: To unhide it just drag it back down. That's it, Shawn How to Turn the Navigation Pane On or Off in Vista How to Change the Open Folder Icon in Vista How to Open and Use Favorite Links in Vista How to Fix Favorite Links Empty in Vista Windows Explorer
How to Edit a Word in the Spell Checker Custom Dictionary in Windows Mail The custom dictionary is the secondary dictionary for Windows Mail Spell Checker. It is the dictionary that you customize by adding your own words that you would like Spell Checker to also use while spell checking your message. This can be helpful if you misspelled a word you added to the custom dictionary from Spell Checker and you want to remove or edit the word. You may also want to add a word or add a whole list without having to do it one at a time in the normal way. The custom dictionary file used by Windows Mail is located at this hidden system file location below. If you have changed the default location of the WinMail stores folder, then the UserDictionary.lex file will be located there instead. C:\Users\(user-name)\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows Mail\UserDictionary.lex Windows Mail only has the English (US), French (France), German (Germany), Spanish (International Sort) languages available in it. If you want or need a email program for languages other than these, then you might consider using the free Mozilla Thunderbird instead. From Inside Windows Mail NOTE: This only allows you to add words one at a time to the custom dictionary from within Windows Mail. 1. While you are running a spell check in Windows Mail, it comes across a word not in it's dictionary. (See screenshot below) 2. If this is the word you want to add to the dictionary, then click the ADD button. 3. It is now added to your custom dictionary. From Using Notepad NOTE: This will allow you to add, delete, or edit words from the custom dictionary. 1. Open Folder Options. A) Dot Show hidden files and folders in Folder Options. B) Click on OK, and close Folder Options. 2. Open the Start Menu. 3. In the white line (Start Search) area, type notepad and press Enter. 4. In Notepad, click on File on the menu bar. (See screenshot below) 5. Click on Open. (See screenshot below) 6. Click on the drop down menu arrow to the right of Text Documents (*.txt) and change it to All Files (*.*) instead in the bottom right corner of the Open window. 7. Navigate to this hidden system file location below. C:\Users\(your username)\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows Mail A) Click on the UserDictionary.lex file to highlight it, then click on Open. 8. This will now open the Userdictionay.lex file inside of Notepad from where you can now add, delete, or edit any word(s) you choose. (See Example screenshots below) WARNING: Make sure that there are no blank lines left between the words by your deletions, additions, or edits. NOTE: If you did not add any words before in Windows Mail or manually here, this will be empty. BEFORE Example NOTE: Deleted the one boxed in red below. AFTER Example NOTE: Notice not to leave a blank line inbetween the words. 9. When done, click on File in the Notepad menu bar and click on Save. 10. Don't forget to go back and dot Do not show hidden files and folders instead in Folder Options. That's it, Shawn How to Fix Most Problems with Vista's "Windows Mail" How to Fix the Spell Checking Language Error, and How To Add the Language List Back How to Enable Always Check Spelling Before Sending Message in Windows Mail
How to Restore Missing Default Send To Context Menu Items in Vista This will show you how to restore any missing default menu items listed in the Send To context (right click) menu. This includes the Compressed (zipped) Folder, Desktop (create shortcut), Documents, Fax Recipient, and Mail Recipient menu items.The Send To menu folder is located in the hidden folder below: C:\Users\(user-name)\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\SendTo EXAMPLE: Send To Context Menu Here's How: 1. For Compressed (zipped) Folder A) Click on the download button below to download the Compressed (zipped) folder.zip file. B) Go to step 6. https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/compressed-zipped-folder-zip.5540/ 2. For Desktop (create shortcut) A) Click on the download button below to download the Desktop (create shortcut).zip file. B) Go to step 6. https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/desktop-create-shortcut-zip.5541/ 3. For Documents A) Click on the download button below to download the Documents.zip file. B) Go to step 6. https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/documents-zip.5542/ 4. For Fax Recipient A) Click on the download button below to download the Fax Recipient .zip file. B) Go to step 6. https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/fax-recipient-zip.5543/ 5. For Mail Recipient A) Click on the download button below to download the Mail Recipient .zip file. https://www.vistax64.com/attachments/mail-recipient-zip.5544/ 6. Click on Save, and save the ZIP file to the Desktop. 7. Right click on the ZIP file (on Desktop), and click on Open. 8. Extract the file to the Desktop. NOTE: This file is the Send To context menu item you selected above. 9. Open the Start Menu. 10. In the white line (Start Search) area, type shell:sendto and press Enter. (See screenshot below) 11. Move the extracted file (step 8) to the Send To folder location in Windows Explorer. (See screenshot below) 12. Close the Send To Windows Explorer window. 13. When done, you can delete the ZIP file on your Desktop. That's it, Shawn How to Restore the Built-in ZIP File Support in Vista How to Customize the Send To Context Menu in Vista How to Add or Remove Send To from the Vista Context Menu How to Remove or Show Drives in the Vista and Windows 7 "Send To" Context Menu How to Add COPY TO FOLDER and MOVE TO FOLDER to the Context Menu in Vista How to Add Quick Launch to the "Send to" Context Menu in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8
How to Debug a BSOD in Vista You might have been directed to Vox's BSOD troubleshooting via Vistax64 forums but STOP errors are caused by 4 key problems: 1. New hardware physically installed that is causing problems or its drivers are causing problems. 2. New software installed that is causing problems or its drivers/services may be causing Vista to STOP. 3. A virus infection could also be causing Vista to fall over. 4. Any system changes via the registry or services control panel that a user might have made or changes that could be made via the first 3 steps. In essence, those are the roots of STOP errors, and most of them are related to poorly written drivers. So if you are getting any STOP errors, consult the above list, and if any of the steps stands out as a problem. Debugging STOP errors is not too difficult. To begin, download the latest version - www.microsoft.com/whdc/devtools/debugging/. Make sure you choose the right architecture for your system, whether x86 for 32-bit or x64 for 64-bit. Download and install the tool. It's a good idea to frequently check the website for new versions of the tool. Once installed you'll see this: This is WinDbg running on an x64 system. The first thing you need to do is configure the symbol path, so open up File - Symbol File Path and enter the text you see in the following diagram: You need an internet connection now, as WinDbg needs to download symbols to read any dump file you may import. Locate a .dmp file and then go to File - Open Crash Dump to locate a .dmp for analysis. Open it and wait for the symbols to download. While you are waiting now is a good time to adjust (as necessary) your dump settings. Open up system properties opening the start menu, right clicking Computer and selecting properties: Accept the UAC prompt, which incidentally should always be turned on, and then select the settings part of Startup and Recovery: It's up to you whether your PC/laptop should restart about a STOP error but I prefer to clear the box. You can also choose to overwrite an existing file or not and what size the dump should be. The following are my settings. Choose the options you want: As the symbols would have been downloaded by now, it's time to examine the results in more detail, so enter !analyze - v If you can't open the .dmp file, close WinDbg, then right-click the shortcut and select run as administrator. It would also be good if you moved the dumps out of protected system locations to your user folder. Once the symbols are downloaded, you don't need an internet connection. Check the C: drive for a symbolfiles folder. I've used an example .dmp file here. However, the same general steps apply, so use this as a template. This has a lot of detail regarding the crash as you can see from the following example in two screenshots: Note for this example the symbol file couldn't be loaded for the FAULTING_IP field, but there is still plenty of information. Your dumps will vary. The first thing to see in the first screenshot: is the VIDEO_TDR FAILURE just under BugCheck Analysis. The debugger lists that it was the result of a time out along with arguments. This is a starting point and the debugger is usually correct. Always look at the info before Debugging Details for reference. More info is displayed below. The BUGCHECK_STR field shows the exception code - in this case its 0x116. The DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID shows the category of the error. In this case, its a graphics driver. The PROCESS_NAME shows the name of the process that raised the exception - in this case it was System. The STACT_TEXT shows a stack trace. The trace shows a single function call in the memory of a call stack, which is a set of stack frames representing the function calls for each thread, if you wanted to know. A new function call means a new stack frame. When the function returns the stack frame is ejected from the stack. Note any recurring faults - in this case dxgkrnl. The STACK_COMMAND shows the command used to obtain STACK_TEXT. You can alter the command or repeat the stack display. The second screenshot shows a trace of the faulting component. The FAILURE_BUCKET_ID is more specific and points to a driver file, as shown by the IMAGE_NAME. It also references the BUGCHECK_STR. This information points to a problem with nvidia drivers. The next step would be to google the IMAGE_NAME along with BSOD to see what solutions are available, i.e. nvlddmkm.sys BSOD. For this, I would first uninstall the driver via device manager, then reboot into safe mode and run drive sweeper by guru3d. Then I would install fresh drivers in safe mode and then try windows once again. More drivers might need to be updated and there might be a hotfix for the dxgkrnl that was at fault. As I've shown, debugging crash dump's isn't too difficult. However, I've barely scratched the surface and there is a lot more to know. I may be posting some advanced guides in the future, but this is enough to check your crash dumps and begin working on a solution. Post back any feedback at www.vistax64.com if you can. v1.2 BSOD with netio.sys or ndis.sys - Fix
Issue : Unable to boot to windows error “bootmgr is missing” Before trying the step below please run startup repair first Solution : 1. Boot the computer from Vista OS DVD. Click on Repair Your Computer. Click on Command prompt. At the X:\Sources prompt, type bcdedit /export C:\BCD_Backup and press <Enter> Type c: and press <Enter>. At the C:\ prompt, type cd boot and press <Enter>. At the C:\Boot prompt, type attrib bcd -s -h -r and press <Enter>. At the C:\Boot prompt, type ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old and press <Enter>. At the C:\Boot prompt, type bootrec /rebuildbcd and press <Enter>. The Boot Configuration File will be rebuilt at this point. Once it finishes, type exit and press <Enter>. Click the Restart button . ;)
How to Create a YUMI MultiBoot USB Flash Drive for Windows This tutorial will teach you how to create a bootable USB so you can install (most) operating systems without a dvd/cd drive, along with several repair tools. Basic Essentials to create a MultiSystem Bootable USB Drive USB Flash or USB Hard Drive PC that can boot from USB Windows XP/Vista/7 to create the Bootable USB YUMI-0.0.6.7.exe Your selection of ISO Files Step 1) Download an .ISO version of your installation (available through various sources [Microsoft, Apple, etc., or just from within the tool itself.]) Step 2) Plug in your USB and open up "My Computer". Right click the USB, and select the "Format" button. Recommended options: FAT32, quick format. Now, continue at the warning prompt. And then press 'Ok' Step 3) Once the format is complete, open up this tool called 'YUMI' YUMI - Multiboot USB Creator (Windows) | USB Pen Drive Linux Step 4) Using 'YUMI', select the drive letter of your USB Make sure you chose the correct USB by opening up 'My Computer' and reading the Drive Letter) Step 5) There is a large list of possible operating systems, along with a built in DOWNLOAD feature! Select the operating system you want to download, and then browse for your .ISO file. Step 6) Press "Create" and wait for 'YUMI' to do all the work. * * * If using the USB on the same computer, SKIP TO STEP 9) * * * Step 7) Once its completed, safely eject the USB. Step 8) Insert the USB into the computer you want to install it on. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Step 9) Restart your computer, and press [F8] or [F11] or [Esc] depending on your computer, at the first screen. Step 10) Temporarily set the USB/Removable Devices to be listed first in the hard drive Boot Priority order list in the BIOS. *** After you are finished installing Vista from the USB, make the Vista hard drive (or partition) listed first in the hard drive Boot Priority order list in the BIOS. *** Step 11) You will now be prompted by YUMI on whether to continue with the regular start from hard drive, or to install an operating system. scroll down to your choice, and press enter. from here, scroll down to select the operating systems you have installed on the USB, and press enter once again. ] Step 12) Your installation will now continue regularly, as if on a CD. Now that you are finished installing Vista from the USB, make the Vista hard drive (or partition) listed first in the hard drive Boot Priority order list in the BIOS. (Step 10) If you have no use for the old windows files, you can clear up some space by going into Start > All Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Cleanup and selecting the drive in which the old windows files are in, and then checking the box that says 'Old Windows Files' and clicking 'Go' * * * * * * ENJOY YOUR NEW OPERATING SYSTEM. * * * * How to Create a Bootable USB Flash Thumb Drive to Install Vista with How to Create a DOS USB Boot Drive
How to Delete and Extend a Partition with Disk Management in Vista When you Delete a hard disk partition (volume) you turn that partition into a unallocated (unformated) partition. You can then use this unallocated partition to Extend another partition to a larger size. For more information, see: Windows Help and How-to: Partition and Understanding Disk Partitioning Partition Type Description Primary Partition A type of partition created on a hard drive that can host an operating system and functions as though it were a physically separate hard drive. Also called a volume. Only up to four primary partitions, or 3 primary partitions and 1 extended partition can be created on a single hard drive. Primary partitions can be used to install and start an operating system. If you want to create more than three partitions, the fourth partition is created as an extended partition. See: Windows Help and How-to: What are system partitions and boot partitions? and The Storage Team at Microsoft - File Cabinet Blog : Understanding the error message "There is not enough space available on the disk(s) to complete this operation" when you create a volume Extended Partition A type of partition on a hard drive that should be used if you want to create more than four Primary partition. Extended partitions can contain multiple logical drives that can be formatted and have drive letters assigned to them. An extended partition is a container that can hold one or more logical drive. Logical drives function like primary partitions except that they cannot be used to start an operating system. This option has been removed in Disk Management for Vista. For how, see: The Storage Team at Microsoft - File Cabinet Blog :How to create an extended partition in Windows Vista (Click Yes for Security Information) This can be handy, for example, if you have one hard drive with two partitions and would like to Delete the second partition and Extend the first (boot) partition with Vista back to one large partion (volume).The default location for Disk Management is C:\Windows\System32\diskmgmt.msc. You will not lose any data on the partition (volume) that you are Extending. The partition you want to delete and use to extend another partion must be to the immediate right of the one you want to extend. You can cannot extend a partition from a deleted partition two or more partions to the right of it. All data on a partition will be lost when you Delete it. Be sure to back up any files that you want to save to a different location before you continue. EXAMPLE: Before and After To Delete a Partition 1. Open the Control Panel. (Classic View) A) Click on the Administrative Tools icon. B) Click on Computer Management. 2. Click on Continue in the UAC prompt. 3. In the left pane, click on Disk Management under Storage. (See screenshot below step 4) 4. Right click on the volume (EX: E:\ ) you want to delete that is just to the right of the partition that you want to extend, and click on Delete Volume. NOTE: If your hard disk is currently set up as a single partition, then you cannot delete it. You also cannot delete a system partition (OS isntalled on), boot partition, or any partition that contains a virtual memory paging file, because Vista needs this information to start correctly. You will have to use the Vista installation disk to delete it. 5. Click on Yes to the confirmation prompt. (See screenshot below) NOTE: This will leave the partition as unallocated (blank) with no drive letter. To Extend a Partition 6. Right click on the partition (EX: C:\ ) the is just to the left of the unallocated space that you want to Extend it into, and click on Extend Volume. (See screenshot below) 7. Click on Next for the Welcome to the Extend Volume Wizard window. (See screenshot below) 8. Select the amount of space in MB you want to use from the unallocated partition to use to Extend this partition. (See screenshot below) NOTE: If you want to make one partition again, then select all of the available space for that one disk. If there were other drives with free unallocated space, they would be shown under the Available selection. WARNING: It is advised that you do not extend a volume on one disk with free space from another disk. If one of the drives has a hardware failure, then all the data on that partition (volume) will be deleted. A) Click on Next. 9. Click on Finish in the Completing Extend window. (See screenshot below) 10. You will now see the Disk Management console with the new Extended partition volume ready to be used. (See screenshot below) 11. Close Computer Management. 12. Click on Computer in the Start Menu and see your new Extened partition volume. (See screenshot below) NOTE: In this example, we will have one large partition from the same hard disk now. That's it, Shawn How to Shrink and Create a Partition with Disk Management in Vista How to Change a Drive Icon in Vista How to Add, Change, or Remove a Drive Letter in Vista How to Change the Default Boot Partition in Vista How to Show or Remove Drive Letters from Displaying in Vista How to Rename a Drive in Vista How to Disable or Enable Low Disk Space Warning in Vista How to Increase Hard Drive Performance in Vista How to Restrict or Unrestict Drive Access in Vista How to Hide or Unhide a Drive in Vista How to Create a Drive Shortcut in Vista How to Mount or Dismount a Drive or Partition to a Folder in Vista How to Convert a FAT or FAT32 Volume to NTFS in Vista How to Recover Deleted Partitions in Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8
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